Brake lights don’t work?

If one or more of your brake lights isn’t working properly, it could mean one of three things: The brake light system fuse is blown, the brake light bulbs are burned out or the brake light wiring switch is broken. All of these issues are easy to troubleshoot.

Why do my tail lights work but not my brake lights?

The most common reason your brake lights are not working but tail lights do is a bad light bulb. It can also be caused by a blown fuse, bad brake light switch, or issues with the wirings. Your vehicle’s taillights are working fine, but the brake lights don’t come on when you press the brakes.

What do I do if my brake lights don’t work?

Answer: If the brake lights don’t work, check the fuse for the circuit; take a look a the brake light switch and, if necessary, the multifunction switch. You can test the brake light switch with a test light.

Can you drive with no brake lights?

An immediate prohibition comes into effect immediately which will see a drivers vehicle immobilised and unable to drive. A delayed prohibition which is the probable notice issued under such defects as defective brake lights, allows for the vehicle to be driven away and the fault(s) must be fixed within 10 days.

Is there a fuse for brake lights?

If your lights don’t illuminate on either side and your brake light switch is good, then the next thing to check is the brake light fuse. Locate your vehicle’s fuse box, which is usually under the hood or on the kick panel inside the passenger compartment. If it has, replace it with a fuse of the same resistance.

Why is my brake lights not working after replacing bulbs?

Blown out light bulbs are the most common reason for why the brake lights not working but the tail lights are. Remove the screws from the bulb lens (which you can access through the trunk or see your vehicle repair manual to get the exact location). Choose the new bulbs of the same type and wattage.

How much does it cost to fix brake lights?

Average Cost The cost of swapping out one or both brake lights can vary widely. You can come across a wide range of prices, from $20 to $150. It will depend on your make and model and where you go to have the work done.

Do all 3 brake lights have to work?

Federal law mandates that all vehicles have the third brake light outfitted within the car. Additionally, the third light must be comparable to the other brake lights on the vehicle so that it is not distracting to the drivers behind the vehicle.

Can you get fined for driving without lights?

Punishment for breaking this law also varies by state, but all fine drivers for failing to use their headlights, which range from $130 to $200. Some states also require those who violate this rule to attend driving classes, which can sometimes come at an additional cost.

Can a bad turn signal switch no brake lights?

On vehicles that use the same lights for brakes and turn signals, a bad turn-signal switch can cause the lower brake-lights not to work. With a bad turn-signal switch, the third-light should still function. On this type system, the turn signals and brakes use the same circuit.

How can you tell if a brake light fuse is bad?

If, however, the test light illuminates when the connection is only pressed against one side of the fuse, the fuse is faulty. If the test light fails to light at all, regardless of where it’s connected to the fuse, you definitely need to replace the fuse.

Where is the brake light relay located?

A brake light switch is a small electrical relay attached to the brake pedal. It is typically installed above the brake pedal and (hopefully) activated every time your pedal is pressed.

How do you check a brake light switch?

Place the sensor on just one of the two wires and hold the brake pedal down as you do so. Then test the other wire. If power is connected and the switch is working properly, the test bulbs will illuminate. If it doesn’t light up, the brake light switch is faulty and will need to be replaced.

5 Common Reasons Why Brake Lights are not Working but Tail Lights Are

When it comes to driving, safety is of the utmost importance. One of the things that you can do to assist maintain road safety is to check that your car’s brake lights and tail lights are functioning correctly. As soon as you apply the brakes, the brake lights illuminate to alert any following cars that they should slow down accordingly. Taillights, on the other hand, are activated when the front headlights are switched on and remain on until the vehicle is stopped. As a result, they don’t glow as brightly as brake lights since they are intended to illuminate the road during periods of heavy rain or at night.

What happens, though, if your taillights are operational but your brake lights are not?

Malfunctioning light bulbs

Light bulbs that have blown out are one of the most prevalent causes of brake lights that aren’t working. This is especially true for people who drive older automobiles. If you depress the brakes and the brake lights do not illuminate, immediately check for a defective light bulb in the brake light assembly. This examination and/or repair does not necessarily necessitate the use of a professional. All that is required is that you open your car trunk and remove the rear cover of the taillights.

If the bulb has become completely black or if you can see a damaged filament inside, it may be necessary to replace it.

Fuse box and light switch

A fuse box is where the cables that give energy to all of the electronic gadgets in your automobile are routed through. If you have a contemporary vehicle, you’ll need to hunt for two fuse boxes on the dashboard. Your car’s owner’s handbook will help you locate the brake light fuse. It is possible that a blown fuse is responsible for brake light issues. If it has blown, it should be replaced with a new one. Check the amperage of the new unit to make sure it is the same as the old one and that it is the same voltage.

Electrical ground

Checking the electrical ground is one of the things you should do if the taillights and brake lights are not working is something else you should do. Especially in cases when the brake light switch is not functioning, this might be a potential problem. Poor electrical grounding, which might be caused by corroded or broken cables, should be looked for. It would be obvious that the ground connection required repair if the brake light illuminated while both the light switch and the brake pedal were connected to a good ground when the brake pedal was depressed.

Wiring

Providing the light bulb, fuse box, and electric ground are all in proper working order, there is one more item you may check to determine why the brake lights are not working – the brake light wiring. Examine the wiring that runs from the fuse panel to the brake light switch, as well as the wire that runs from the switch to the bulb sockets.

A loose connection or corrosion in the bulb housing might be causing the problem, respectively. If you discover any issues with these components, be sure you have them replaced immediately.

Turn signal switch

In certain automobiles, the brake lights are powered by the same circuit as the turn signal lights, which saves on wiring costs. If this is the situation with your vehicle and the turn signal light is not functioning, it is likely that the brake lights are not functioning as well. If it is feasible to replace the cable that connects these two devices, please do so immediately. If this is the case, you may need to consult with your trusted technician. It is possible for your taillights to become inoperative for a variety of reasons, some of which may be the same as the reasons why your brake lights have stopped working.

Whenever this occurs, you may go to this guide to assist you in determining the root of the problem.

Ultimately, as a driver and car owner, it is your obligation to ensure that your brake lights and taillights are operational at all times while driving.

Please feel free to stop by The Auto Warehouse for additional helpful auto care advice, or if you’re interested in driving home in a high-quality used vehicle, stop by The Auto Warehouse.

Brake Lights Not Working?

You’ve just been informed that your brake lights are not functioning properly. Often, it is done by a fellow driver, but occasionally, it is done by a police officer during a traffic stop, which is never a pleasant experience. Given the seriousness of this issue, as well as the legal consequences, making certain that your brake lights are operational is essential for a variety of reasons. Understanding how they function and how to troubleshoot them is just as vital as knowing how to use them.

  1. One side of this switch has a 12V power supply that is secured by a fuse.
  2. Alternatively, when you press down on the brake pedal, electricity is delivered to the brake lights, causing the circuit to shut and the brake light bulbs to illuminate.
  3. It is provided to the BCM the data necessary to activate the brake lights if the circuit is closed or the circuit is grounded (after you press down on the brake pedal).
  4. These features must be operational at all times, but as we all know, automotive components can fail at any time for any reason.

You can fix brake light difficulties on your own to prevent receiving a ticket or being involved in an accident before driving your car to a repair for assistance. Let’s start with a look at some of the most prevalent reasons of brake light failure and what you can do to try to resolve the issue.

Why are My Brake Lights Staying On or Off?

The fact that your brake lights aren’t working has just been brought to your attention. Often, it is done by a fellow driver, but occasionally, it is done by a police officer during a traffic stop, which is never a pleasant situation. There are safety and legal ramifications to this problem, therefore making sure that your brake lights are operational is essential for a variety of reasons. Equally crucial is an understanding of how they function and how to troubleshoot them. When it comes to today’s automobiles, brake lights are still activated by a switch affixed to the brake pedal, or they might be activated by a hydraulic switch positioned on the brake line or within the master cylinder itself.

  1. Alternatively, when you press down on the brake pedal, electricity is transferred to the brake lights, causing the circuit to close and the brake light bulbs to illuminate.
  2. When the circuit is closed or grounded, the BCM receives the information needed to activate the brake lights (after you press down on the brake pedal).
  3. This creates an extensive network of relayed information.
  4. You can fix brake light issues on your own before sending your car to a repair to prevent receiving a ticket or being involved in an accident.
  • There are issues with the brake light switch. Grounding issues in connection with the brake light switch circuit are common. Brake light bulbs that have gone out of service
  • The brake light sockets have failed or have become rusted. The turn signal switch is not working properly.

The brake light bulb should be the first thing you inspect because it is the most straightforward and least expensive repair. If that is not the problem, you will need to know how to diagnose problems with either the brake light switch or the circuit that it is connected to – something that is much easier said than done, as you will discover. If you believe you require the services of a mechanic to troubleshoot the circuit at this stage, please consult our list of Preferred Shops in your region that can assist you in resolving your problem.

How to Troubleshoot Brake Lights That Aren’t Working

Using a multimeter (volt meter) and/or a voltage light is the first and most critical piece of equipment you’ll need in order to effectively diagnose brake lights (probe). In most cases, either tool will suffice, however the Multimeter will often perform better when checking for ground continuity or other issues. If you are unsure about how to correctly operate a Multimeter, you should learn how to do so first, since the rest of this article will presume that you know how to properly use the equipment.

  • In many vehicles, the filament that powers your turn signal bulb is also used to power the brake light.
  • If the brake pedal is depressed while the turn signal is on, the turn signal must still be depressed in order to switch on and off the already lighted bulb, just as if the brake pedal had not been used at all.
  • After you’ve ruled out the bulb, the next step is to inspect the socket for damage.
  • Many sockets will include dielectric grease (often referred to as bulb grease) — this is a good thing since it prevents corrosion from forming in the first place.
  • Many brake light problems may be traced back to a faulty socket, and visual inspection is generally the first step in determining the source of the problem in this case.
  • If the problem persists, the next step is to check the voltage and ground connections.
  • Some grounds are located directly at the taillight assembly, whereas others are shared by many grounds in a single area, such as the trunk or underbody of the car.

The lights in the back of the automobile are normally connected by a common ground, or set of grounds, and they are frequently the source of the problem due to corrosion or filth.

Depending on the situation, this might be a clean, exposed bolt or a clean region behind one of the taillights.

Set your multimeter to DC volts and have a companion apply the brake pedal on command while you measure the voltage.

If this socket is a dual-pin configuration, the other filament is your driving lights, which may be readily identified by simply turning on the vehicle’s lights to identify them.

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This may be accomplished by using a probing pin on your multimeter to “stab” the wire at the desired location.

You’re doing this to rule out the possibility that something is wrong with the socket connection. If you suddenly have 12V when you stab the wire, you know that the fault is either in the socket or in the grounding circuit. After that, let’s have a look at the ground.

How to Test Bad Ground Connections

Grounds are a continual adversary for everything that operates on 12V DC power. Over time, even a small quantity of corrosion can cause a ground to stop functioning correctly, resulting in an open circuit. To check the grounding of a circuit, the simplest approach is to switch your voltmeter to the Continuity (Ohms) setting. For the most part, meters will feature an audio diode test setting, which means that when you touch the two probes together, the meter will emit an audible beep, which is significantly more convenient than gazing at the screen.

  1. Connect one of the probes to the ground bolt that you discovered during the last test.
  2. Getting a buzzer indicates that the ground is good.
  3. The absence of a beep while testing grounds indicates that there is no continuity from your good, known ground point to the ground being tested.
  4. Verify all of your grounding spots or cables all the way up till the socket to check that your ground is still solidly connected.

Troubleshoot the Circuit Further

It is possible that your problem is farther upstream if all of the grounds at the back of the car appear to be in good working order but you still have no voltage coming from any of the 12V sources here. This sort of difficulty can also be caused by wiring errors that are farther up the chain. The wire that was shorted or damaged will need to be traced all the way to the dash and brake light switch if it was shorted or broken. In automobiles that use the BCM as a trigger, issues with the BCM might also result in brake lights not working properly.

The mechanic will need to either use a technical service manual that is currently accessible or replace the BCM itself if it is in good condition.

Brake Light Switch or Turn Signal Problems

The brake light switch is frequently the source of the problem. A number of factors might contribute to it malfunctioning and causing the brake lights to malfunction. The switch is actuated by pushing the brake pedal, and it can become stuck in either the OFF or ON position, resulting in no brake lights or continual brake lights, depending on the situation. Make sure there is no corrosion or damage on the connection to the switch before installing a replacement switch, which may be obtained at your local AutoZone.

  1. A hydraulic switch is frequently used on older vehicles such as classic automobiles to control the brake light.
  2. The switch is activated when the pressure in the brake fluid increases (as a result of the brakes being applied).
  3. After you’ve cleaned them properly, you should look into replacing the switch.
  4. Although it is rare, certain vehicles may suffer from a faulty turn signal switch, which will still allow you to utilize your turn signals but will prevent your brake lights from working correctly.

Troubleshooting anything electrical may be difficult, but ticking each box in the diagnosis can assist you in narrowing down all of the possible reasons of the problem. Please stop by your local AutoZone today if you want any components or information on bulbs or electrical systems.

5 Reasons Why Brake Lights Not Working But Tail Lights Are

You and other drivers on the road are at risk if you are driving at night with either your brake lights or your tail lights not functioning properly. It takes a long time to notice when the brake lights are not functioning but the tail lights are, or vice versa, because they are so close together. This is due to the fact that you will not be aware of what is going on in the backseat unless someone calls your attention to it. For road safety, both the brake and tail lights are essential components.

It has the potential to cause serious accidents, particularly on dark roadways or during periods of heavy rain or snow.

The Reasons for Brake Lights Not Working but Tail Lights Are

While driving, the tail lights function normally, however using the brakes causes the rear lights to go completely dark. This is a strange problem because the tail lights function normally when driving. Occasionally, squeezing the brakes will also turn off the tail lights, and they will not come back on until you release the brakes. The following are some probable causes of brake lights not working but tail lights operating:

The Light Bulbs

While driving, the tail lights function normally, however using the brakes causes the rear lights to go completely dark. This is a strange problem because the tail lights function normally when you are driving. When you apply the brakes, the tail lights may also be turned off, and they may not turn back on until you release the brakes. Several factors might be at play if brake lights are not functioning, yet tail lights are:

Fuse Box and Light Switch

You’ll need to locate the fuse box or the power distribution center to complete the task (PDC). The fuse panel will be located beneath the dashboard, while the PDC will be located under the hood. The brake light switch may also be discovered under the dashboard, and it should be checked to see if its plunger is in contact with the brake pedal arm. The brake lights will be affected if there is an issue with the fuse box or light switch. If a fuse has blown, it should be replaced with a brand new one.

Apart from that, you should try to determine what caused the blown fuse.

The Electrical Ground

If the brake light switch is operational, the next step is to look for a faulty electrical grounding (some car models have the switch provided ground). Because of a loose connection in the wire, or because of corrosion or damage to the wire ends, this might happen. With a jumper wire, connect the light switch to a good ground and push the brake pedal to complete the circuit. If the brake light illuminates, it means that the ground connection has to be repaired. MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT:

  • Find out what the dashboard warning lights mean in their entirety. Learn everything you can about the automobile lighting system.

Check the Wiring

If all of the above-mentioned components are functioning properly, you will need to explore elsewhere for the root of the problem. It is possible that the wire from the fuse panel to the brake light switch, as well as the cabling from the switch to the bulb sockets and lights, is loose or fraying.

It is possible that the connector and bulb housing have become rusted. If you discover a problem with these components, you must replace them.

Examine the Turn Signal Switch

In some car types, the brake light circuit can be found as a component of the turn signal circuit. If the brake light switch is broken or malfunctioning, the brake light will not illuminate. Examine the wiring schematic for the switch and look for the single wire that connects the brake light and turn signal switches to each other. Connect a test light to the electrical connector on the turn light switch, activate the brake light switch by squeezing the brake pedal, and then back probe the wire with the test light.

Why Won’t My Tail Lights Work When My Headlights Are On

When used in conjunction with a turn signal, the brake light circuit is known as a turn signal circuit. Damaged or faulty switches will cause the brake light to not function. Examine the wiring schematic for the switch and look for the single wire that connects the brake light and turn signal switches to the rest of the vehicle. Connect a test light to the electrical connector on the turn light switch, activate the brake light switch by pushing the brake pedal, and then back probe the wire with the test light to determine its condition.

  • Electrical problems include: blown fuses, damaged wiring, and burned out bulbs.

It is recommended that you take your car to an experienced technician if you are still unable to determine the source of the problem with your non-functional brake lights or tail lights or if you are unsure about the measures outlined above. If you are unfamiliar with the operation of a car’s mechanism, do not attempt to repair anything, whether it is a significant or little problem.

Frequently Asked Questions

Brake lights and tail lights are the most well-known automobile components that car owners are interested in learning about because there are so many difficulties associated with them. In this post, our automotive specialists will assist automobile owners in answering some of the most often asked questions: What may be causing the brake lights to not function? There are three factors that might contribute to this problem:

  1. As a result of the numerous issues surrounding brake lights and tail lights, they are the most well-known automotive components that car owners want to comprehend. Some of the most frequently asked concerns about automobiles are addressed in this post by our automotive specialists. What might be the source of faulty brake lights? Several factors might have a role in creating this problem:

Fortunately, all of these issues can be identified and resolved with relative ease. What might be causing my rear lights to remain illuminated? There are a variety of reasons for the tail light to remain illuminated even after the vehicle has been shut off: A bad brake light switch stopper, a damaged trailer light plug, a faulty brake light switch stopper, a problematic wire harness, to name a few issues. There are a variety of causes for this; nevertheless, you can determine whether the brake lights or the tail lights are malfunctioning to determine which components are at fault.

  • They are distinct from one another.
  • You may also tell what it is by the color: On most automobiles, the tail lights are a standard red color, however the brake lights are a more bright red color.
  • When the brake lights are not working correctly, you must first ensure that the electricity is getting to them and then inspect the fuse for damage.
  • What is the best way to check my brake lights on my own?
  • Having the ignition on is required before you can check the brake lights for clear illumination.
  • The next step is to locate a floor brush or mop and place the end of the brush or mop on the brake pedal.
  • Automobile owners may now depress the brake pedal until it is fully engaged and secured in place.

What is the approximate cost of replacing a brake light?

When it comes to replacing the brake light bulb, the expense is always small.

What is the approximate cost of rewiring brake lights?

As a result, the labor costs will range between $7 and $60.

Is it legal for me to drive without brake lights?

The first thing that will happen is that you will be stopped and punished by a police officer since it is absolutely prohibited to drive without a functioning brake light.

Without brake lights, it is hard for other drivers to see whether you are stopping or not, increasing the likelihood of an accident on the road.

How long does it take to repair a broken brake light light? 1 hour and 30 minutes Because it is not complex at all, this is the maximum amount of time you should allow for brake light bulb replacement. It should take between 40 and 60 minutes to finish the procedure.

Brake Lights Not Working But Tail Lights Are? (How To Fix)

The brake lights and taillights are frequently made up of the same light bulb, however they function in a different way. Driving at night without brake lights or tail lights may be exceedingly dangerous, and should be avoided at all costs. The difficulty is that it is not always possible to identify if your taillights and brake lights are malfunctioning. As a result, it is essential that both your taillights and brake lights function properly. However, there are times when one of them is effective while the other is ineffective under certain situations.

  • Most of the time, a faulty light bulb is the source of your brake lights not functioning but your tail lights operating.
  • When you use the brakes, the brake lights on your car do not illuminate.
  • This is a peculiar difficulty to have because, in essence, the connections for both lights are coming from the same source, which makes sense.
  • What ever your issue is, there is a reason for it, and there is a solution to it.

5 Causes of Brake Lights Don’t Work But Tail Lights Do

Taillights on new automobiles are frequently made of LED technology. However, if you have an older vehicle, you should inspect the light bulbs. Although the brake light and tail light are frequently shared by the same bulb, there are two separate circuits within it. It is possible that one circuit is working while the other is completely destroyed as a result of this. Light bulb replacement is frequently a basic process, and light bulbs are quite inexpensive to replace. When in doubt, use a multimeter or an external 12volt source to check that they are not completely dead.

If the incorrect fuse is inserted, there might potentially be a circuit short someplace that caused all of the lights to go out.

2. Bad Brake Light Switch

When your brake lights are not working, a faulty brake switch is a common cause of the problem. When you press your brake pedal, a tiny switch is put at the brake pedal to notify the control unit that the pedal has been depressed, which then sends electricity to the brake lights.

A multimeter may be used to check the brake light switch to ensure that there is a connection when the brake switch is released but no connection when the brake switch is pressed. Depending on the brake switch type, this can also be the case in the other direction.

3. Broken Fuse Or Fuse Box

Wires running through a car’s fuse box provide energy to all of the electrical devices in it. Modern automobiles are equipped with two or more fuse boxes. There’s usually one underneath the dashboard, and there’s also one under the hood of the vehicle. It is necessary to consult your vehicle’s owner’s handbook in order to locate the brake light fuse placement. There is a good likelihood that the brake light fuse has blown as a result of an electrical surge. Recognize and replace the faulty fuse with one that is comparable.

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Whether the fuse has blown, you should check to see if there is a short circuit in the wiring or in the connector to the brake light before replacing it.

Remember to inspect the fuse box for any tracks of water at the same time, since they might produce circuit shorts in the fuse box, which could result in a fuse being blown out.

4. Bad Sockets and Connectors

It is also possible that corrosion has developed in the pins of the taillight connections. Check for rust or corrosion by removing the tail light connectors and inspecting the connections. Reinstall the components after spraying them with electrical cleaner. Make sure that there is no connecting plug in the automobile that connects the brake light switch to the tail light, since this might cause a problem. In certain instances, a plug positioned on the car’s floor has become clogged with water, resulting in corrosion of the plug.

Additionally, there is a possibility that corrosion or rust has formed in the sockets where the light bulbs are mounted.

5. Broken Wire

In rare instances, there may also be a faulty cable elsewhere in the system. Due to the fact that the wiring from within the brake light system may go from the front of the vehicle to the back, this might be a difficult part to locate. To test for voltage, turn on the taillight while pressing the brake pedal and then turn on the brake pedal switch to see if there is any difference in the voltage. If you are unable to obtain voltage on any of the wires leading to the brake light switch, there is an issue with the power supply; either a blown fuse or a faulty wire.

4 Common Brake Light Problems and How to Solve Them

Problems with the brake lights don’t have to be a source of stress. When it comes to troubleshooting brake light problems, there are some difficulties that come up time and over again, which makes it that much simpler to find out what’s wrong with your brakes when you touch the pedal. See how to resolve these four typical brake light conundrums, as well as how to avoid them in the future.

1. Burnt Out Bulb

The most common brake light problem is a burned out bulb, which is simple to understand given how common it is. When you examine how much time you spend with your foot on the brake, it is important to remember that the bulb must be lighted throughout the whole duration.

Modern automobiles have turned to LED lights that last far longer, but older vehicles still have bulbs that must be removed and replaced on a regular basis. Most of the time, it’s inexpensive and simple to do with a minimal set of tools.

2. Bad Brake Light Switch

When the brake pedal is depressed, a switch is activated, signaling to the rear-view mirror lights that it is time to turn them on and turn them on. In the course of time, analog switches become worn and dusty, which impairs their capacity to establish positive contact with the input signal and send the correct signal. In this case, replacing the switch is not a difficult task, and it is also simple for your mechanic to diagnose brake light problems such as this one. If all three brake lights go out at the same time, it’s improbable that the trio of bulbs went out at the same time as a single unit.

3. Blown Fuse

A switch is activated when the brake pedal is depressed, signaling to the rear-view mirror lights that it is time to turn them on. In the course of time, analog switches become worn and dusty, which impairs their capacity to make positive contact with the signal source and transfer it correctly. It’s not difficult to replace the switch, and it’s also simple for your mechanic to diagnose brake light problems such as this one when they arise. Even if all three brake lights are out at the same time, it’s doubtful that the trio of bulbs went out at the same time as the other two.

4. Bad Socket

If you have a single brake light that is not working and the bulb is in fine working order, the next step is to inspect the light socket. Among the causes of brake light malfunctions are sockets with unclean or corroded connections, as well as wire that has gotten worn to the point where it is only making sporadic connections. Simply cutting the old wires and joining them together to form a new socket is all it takes to replace a socket, which is usually a rather affordable item to acquire. If you keep these suggestions in mind, the majority of brake light issues will be simple to identify and repair by yourself.

NAPA Online has a comprehensive selection of vision and safety goods, or you may visit one of our 17,000 NAPA AutoCare facilities for routine maintenance and repairs.

The image is courtesy of Morguefile.

Benjamin HuntingView All

I was introduced to Studebakers at an early age, and I spent my formative years surrounded by them at automobile exhibitions around Quebec and the northern United States. About 10 years of racing, rebuilding, and obsessing over vehicles has led me to pursue a full-time career in science writing while also working in automotive journalism.

As an editor, I presently contribute to various online and print automotive journals, and I also write and consult for companies in the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

AGCO Automotive Repair Service – Baton Rouge, LA – Detailed Auto Topics

Brake lights seem extremely simple. Press the brake pedal and they come on, release, and they go off. Many things can and do go wrong. When they do, this guide can help find the problem.� A volt ohm meter or a LED test light will be needed for some tests. Using these tools properly is very important. The point�of the tool probe should only touch the contact, when checking. Pushing the probe into a light socket will spread the contacts and cause the socket to fail.� Please read, ” Tips on� Automotive Electrical Testing,” for more information.

Brake lights will not go off

Only a few factors are often responsible for brake lights remaining illuminated. Bad brake-light switches are one of the most prevalent causes of brake-light failure. If the contacts become stuck, the switch may continue to give electricity to the lights even after it has been off. Check to determine if a switch can be tested before deciding whether or not to replace it. Compared to digital switches, analog switches are more simpler to use. In certain modern automobiles, digital sensors may be used instead of a switch to control the engine.

  1. The kind of vehicle will generally be identified by the service data for the vehicle in question.
  2. It is necessary to have a wiring schematic and an ohmmeter.
  3. When just two terminals are used, continuity should be seen in one place and an open circuit should be shown in the other.
  4. A wiring diagram will provide color codes or terminal numbers to make identification easier, and it will also save time.
  5. When the brake pedal is depressed, the brake-lamp component of the switch will indicate that it is operational.
  6. When the brake light switch is in this position, the brake light switch becomes an open circuit.
  7. The operation of other terminals may differ.

It is also possible that the brake pedal will not make contact with the switch.

Should one or more of these pads break or fall out, the pedal may not be able to press the switch sufficiently when released.

It is also possible for a switch to become misaligned, increasing the distance between the plunger and the pedal.

The switch should move as a result of the pedal being pressed.

In rare situations, the brake booster may fail, resulting in the pedal not rising sufficiently to make contact with the contact switch.

The last scenario is that a wire has been shorted to power. If the brake lights continue to illuminate after you unplug the brake light switch, you have a short circuit. Finding a shorted-circuit of this nature is best left to a trained specialist.

Brake lights will not come on

When the brake lights do not illuminate, the first thing to look for is a malfunctioning third brake light. If it is not functioning, the brake-light switch, a blown fuse, or a disconnected harness are all possibilities. A simple test is to utilize the emergency flashers on vehicles that use the brake lights as flashers to see how well they work. This will not apply to cars in which the flashers are distinct from the brake lights, as described above. The wiring, bulbs, and sockets for the emergency flashers are frequently the same as those for the brakes.

Check for a blown fuse and proceed with caution, since many vehicles have more than one fuse box to deal with the problem.

The presence of good fuses indicates that the brake-light switch is the most likely source of the problem.

If the switch does not exhibit continuity when the button is pressed, the switch should be replaced.

Lower-lights out, but third light works

When the lower lights do not illuminate and only the third brake light illuminates, it is possible that the brake-light switch is to blame. Check the emergency-flashers once more to see if there are any wiring, socket, or bulb issues. If the flashers are operational, check for blown fuses since some vehicles have distinct circuits for the lower and third brake lights, which can cause confusion. A malfunctioning turn-signal switch on a vehicle that uses the same lights for both brakes and turn signals might cause the lower brake lights to become inoperative as a result.

  • The turn signals and brakes are connected to the same circuit on this sort of system.
  • If this were not the case, the lights would remain on and not flash.
  • A damaged wire leading to or from the switch may also result in the lower brake lights failing to illuminate.
  • As a result, a faulty turn signal switch will have no effect on it.

Third brake-light out but lower lights work

Examine it to see if it will blink with the emergency flashers if just the third light is not working and the lowers are still operational. If the inoperative third light flashes in conjunction with the emergency flashers, the most likely reason is a blown fuse. If it does not work when the flashers are activated, it is likely that the third-light has failed bulbs or sockets.

In many cases, current third-brake lights are made of LEDs and do not have bulbs that can be changed. These must generally be replaced as a unit and are not repairable or replaceable parts.

Brake lights out on one side

The most common cause of a brake light that is not working on one side is a faulty bulb or socket. If the lamp still does not illuminate after using the emergency flashers, the most likely cause is a problem with the bulbs or sockets. Inspect the filament of the bulb and replace any that are discovered to be defective. To verify bulbs that cannot be verified any other way, substitute a known good bulb from the other side.

Checking light sockets and connectors

Look for evidence of discoloration, deformation, or corrosion on the contacts of sockets that have been dropped. Check for voltage by softly touching the terminals with a voltmeter while the brakes are down. If there is no voltage at the terminals, it is necessary to back-probe the wires behind the socket if at all feasible. Alternatively, a straight pin can be used to penetrate the insulation on the wire beneath the socket if no other means is available. Keep in mind that if you don’t seal any area checks in this fashion, the broken wire may create more difficulties.

If there is a voltage present between the wires and a ground, it is necessary to examine the continuity of the ground wire.

If the ground is sound, it is recommended that the socket be replaced.

Finding broken wires and bad connectors

In the illustration above, assume the red wire is the power lead for the brake lights and that the black wire is the ground for the circuit. When we depress the brake, the red wire shows 12 volts, because current is flowing. If it does not, a problem exists with this circuit.With the brakes still applied, less than 0.1 volts should show on the black wire, when checked to the body ground. More voltageshows high resistancein the ground circuit. Full system voltage between the black wire and system ground suggest missing or broken ground. We can also use an ohmmeter to check for continuity between the black lead and body ground.Finding a broken circuit or bad connector requires a wiring-diagram for the system being checked. The basic procedure is to start at one end of the circuit and check for voltage and ground. If either cannot be found, go to the other end of the circuit. Voltage and ground at this point show the need to select a midway point. Power and ground here, means the problem is in the second half of the circuit. A lack of power or ground shows the first half holds the problem. The procedure is repeated,�dividing the circuit in half,�until the problem is found.Most brake light problems are fairly simple to find. For tougher problems give AGCO a call. We specialize in electrical diagnosis, minor or major. Post or Read Comments (11)

❤️ Brake Lights Not Working But Tail Lights Are? ❤️

When you’re behind the wheel, you’re dealing with an annoying problem. Your brake lights are not working, but your taillights are operating properly. Your brake lights are extremely vital because they accomplish exactly what their name implies: they alert other drivers that you are braking or coming to a complete stop. As a result, if these lights are not lighted, you face the danger of being involved in an accident or collision. We have the reasons and solutions you require right now! Automobile repairs are EXTREMELY EXPENSIVE.

Several Reasons Why Your Reasons Why Brake Lights Not Working but Tail Lights Are

Okay, so what exactly is going on with the brake lights not functioning, but the tail lights working perfectly? We have identified several common reasons of this problem.

What is The Difference Between Tail Lights and Brake Lights?

When it comes to many automobiles, the taillights and brake lights are both included within the same globe. This indicates that they both have the same exterior covering as one another. Your car, on the other hand, may be one-of-a-kind and include its own set of globes. When you turn on your headlights or depress the parking brake, your tail lights are activated automatically. Your brake lights will illuminate as soon as you put pressure to the brake pedal. The tail lights on most cars are red, but the brake lights are a bit brighter and a more brilliant red than the tail lights on most vehicles.

Why Are My Brake Lights Not Working?

Take a look at some of the most prevalent causes!

Blown Out Light Blubs

Did you know that car brake light bulbs that have simply burned out are the most common cause of brake lights that are not working properly? Remove the bulb’s fasteners (or screws) that are positioned on the lens of the bulb in order to correct the problem if blown bulbs are the source of the problem. The bulbs may be accessible only through the trunk of your vehicle; nevertheless, you should consult your car’s owner’s handbook for instructions on how to get access. After that, turn on your light bulbs.

You should replace the bulbs when the light bulbs appear to be dim or the filaments have become brittle.

In a large number of European automobiles, the same bulb may be used for both the brake and the tail lights. However, it is possible to have double filaments, which permits one set of filaments to continue to function while the other set of filaments is burned out.

Perhaps A Bad Electrical Ground Is To Blame

If you have a working brake light switch, you will need to look for a faulty electrical ground in order to diagnose the problem. A grounding switch is included in a number of different automobile types. This incorrect electrical grounding can be caused by a loose connection between the wire and the grounding device. It is also possible that the wire ends have been damaged or corroded, which would result in a poor electrical ground. Make sure that the light switch is connected to a good ground by connecting it with a jumper cable or wire in order to resolve the problem.

If the brake lights come on as a result of your ground connection being repaired, you have successfully repaired your ground connection.

Light Switch And Fuse Box Can Be To Blame

Locate the fuse box or the PDC, which stands for power distribution center, on your vehicle’s dashboard. The fuse panel will be positioned beneath the dashboard, and the power distribution center (PDC) should be located directly under the hood of the car. If you search under the dashboard, you will also find the brake light switch. After that, you’ll want to make sure that the plunger is in contact with the brake pedal arm. The brake lights on your car will not function properly if you have a problem with your vehicle’s light switch or fuse box.

Please keep in mind that a new one must have the exact same amperage as the previous one.

If you don’t, you’ll be dealing with a reoccurring problem.

Do You Have a Damaged Tail Switch?

It is possible that the brake light circuit is a component of your vehicle’s turn signal circuit. This is true for a large number of car models. If the switch is faulty or damaged in any manner, the brake lights will not illuminate or respond in any way. Consequently, you should inspect the switch and examine the wiring diagram. Then check for the single wire that connects the turn signal switches to the brake light and other electrical components. Locate the electrical connector, which is the next step.

The wire should then be probed with a test light.

Check For Issues With the Wiring

If everything we’ve discussed so far is functioning properly, it’s possible that you’re experiencing a problem with the wiring that runs from the fuse panel to the brake light switch. Frayed or loose wire from the fuse box that links to the brake light switch, as well as the bulb lights and sockets, might be the source of the problem. It is possible that the connection between the bulb housing and the connector has been broken or rusted.

What Will it Cost Me To Get my Brake Lights Fixed?

You now have a better understanding of the reasons why your brake lights are not working yet your tail lights are working.

I’m curious as to how much it will cost to get those brake lights repaired. We’ll break it down for you in the following sections:

What Should I Expect?

It is now necessary to take your vehicle to a mechanic who is accredited and certified. You could even come across one that will come to your house or other venue. That mechanic will listen in on your conversation about the problem and then test the brake lights as well as the tail lights. She or he will experiment to find what works and what doesn’t work for them. She or he will also take the time to look through your wiring to see if there are any problems.

What Will The Mechanic Check For?

The mechanic will first check to determine if there is an electrical problem causing your brake lights to not function properly. If the problem is electrical in nature, a volt meter can be used to pinpoint the specific location of the absence of electricity by the technician.

How Important Is This Brake Light Service?

If you drive your car with defective brake lights, you will almost definitely not cause any harm to it. However, it is dangerous for you to drive if your brake lights are not working correctly, since they might cause an accident. Consider the implications of this. How will the drivers in front of you know whether you are accelerating or decelerating? When your brake lights are not working properly, you are placing yourself in serious danger. You also face the danger of being issued a citation.

As a result, if you are caught driving with your brake lights off, you might face significant fines and charges.

What is the Cost of Getting This Issue Fixed?

If you are unable to figure out how to change your brake light bulb and you only require a replacement for a conventional bulb that has gone out, you are dealing with a very affordable problem on your hands. We might become so busy and stressed out with life that finding a location to change a bulb in our automobile can become a bit of a challenge at times. Consequently, take your automobile to a professional and enable him or her to repair the brake bulb in your vehicle. The cost of replacing a single brake or tail light bulb, including labor, is around $50 dollars.

The cost of a repair for an electrical problem might go into the hundreds of dollars if the problem is serious enough to warrant it.

What Are Causes Of The Third Brake Light Not Working?

If you are unable to figure out how to repair your brake light bulb and you only require a replacement for a conventional bulb that has gone out, you are dealing with a very affordable problem on your hands. Even identifying the location of where to replace a bulb in our automobile might be a challenge at times when we are overburdened and stressed out by life’s demands. Consequently, take your vehicle to a repair and have him or her replace the brake bulb. It will cost around $50 dollars to replace a single brake or tail light bulb, including labor.

The expense of a repair for an electrical problem might go into the hundreds of dollars if the problem is severe enough to require it. You want to ensure that the problem is diagnosed completely and thoroughly.

Why Do My Brake Lights Work but My Tail Lights Don’t?

If you are unable to find out how to change your brake light bulb and you only require a replacement for a conventional bulb that has gone out, you are dealing with a reasonably affordable problem. We might become so busy and stressed out with life that finding a location to change a bulb in our automobile can become a bit of a challenge. As a result, take your vehicle to a repair and enable him or her to replace the brake bulb. The cost of replacing one brake or tail light bulb, including labor, is around $50 dollars.

If you have an electrical problem, you may be looking at a repair that may cost you a few hundred dollars or more.

Why Do My Brake Lights Work but My Tail Lights Don’t

Why do my brake lights work but my tail lights do not? In this section, we’ll go over the most likely explanations for this.

Faulty Tail Light Bulb

In this section, we’ll go through the most likely causes for why my brake lights work but my tail lights don’t.

Problematic Fuse

More than just the broken bulbs, you will notice that there is something wrong with the fuse, which is responsible for ensuring that the entire electric system of the automobile operates smoothly and without causing any harm. Its primary function is to trip when the current flow becomes excessive. The electric system is safeguarded by this rupture. Now, if you want to check the fuse, there are two locations you may look in the automobile to find it. The first is the fuse box. The first one may be found on the panel located in the cabin of the vehicle.

  • The second location is directly beneath the hood of the vehicle.
  • All that is required is that you determine which fuse is blown.
  • When the lid is removed, it is possible to access the fuse.
  • This is something that you should be able to discover in the owner’s handbook or on the internet if you search for it.
  • Whether or not it works may be determined by checking whether or not the tester is illuminated.
  • If, on the other hand, it does not illuminate, you will have to get a new one.

Bad Bulb Socket

If you have already tested the fuse and the bulbs, and you have determined that they are both in perfect working order, the next item you should check is the socket. Sometimes a problem with the socket might result in the tail lights not operating properly. Moist conditions have the potential to cause harm to the sockets. Building up of any form of moisture can cause problems with the wiring, which can eventually result in failure of the circuitry. It is also possible that the sockets will not function correctly due to a faulty connection of the wiring.

You should either update it or get it checked out if this is the case for you. Another possibility is that a bent or damaged pin in the socket has caused the light to stop operating entirely. So keep an eye out for any of these evident issues so that you can address them as soon as possible.

Well Worn Wiring

The electrical system is responsible for ensuring that everything runs smoothly. And if there’s a stray wire out of position, there’s a good probability. You won’t be able to proceed with this unless you have a suitable wiring diagram for the automobile. And you’ll have to track down the ones that are linked to the tail lights in order to figure out what’s going on with them. Googling around for a problem with the tail light is just too time-consuming and needless in this situation. As well as paying attention to a worn-out wire in the automobile, you should also pay attention to the ground circuit, which can occasionally cause an issue with the tail lights.

Faulty Light Sensor

Automobiles are becoming more equipped with automated functions as time goes on. This makes driving a whole lot less difficult for us. It has a light sensor, which is one of the novel features. In many cases, the computerized system of the automobile can determine when to turn on which light and when not to. If there is a problem with the sensor, it is possible that this is the cause of your tail lights not working. Even if the sensor may be programmed to turn off the lights during the day, it may be unable to distinguish between day and night due to malfunctioning.

It is possible that the sensor will become faulty, in which case you will need to have it repaired or replaced with a jeep light bar.

In that situation, a thorough cleaning will be sufficient.

Failure in the Control Switch

Control Switch failure is a common occurrence. Your tail light could not be working even when your brake lights are operating due of a faulty control switch, which is the absolute last possible explanation. When you wish to turn on the headlights or the tail lights, you must touch a button on the steering wheel. It sends the signal, and the lights begin to operate as a result of that. If the switches were not functioning properly, there would be no signal produced. You may not be able to find this out on your own, but if you have explored all other possibilities, it is possible that the control switch is to blame for all of the problems you are experiencing.

To ensure that everything operates well, you can always show it to someone with more expertise or take it to a professional who will ensure that everything runs properly.

Conclusion

The solution to your query about why my brake lights function but my tail lights do not should be revealed at the conclusion of this section. Just have a look around and you should be able to find the solution to your inquiry!

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