P0480 Radiator Fan doesn’t work?

Error Code P0480 is defined as Cooling Fan 1 Control Circuit Malfunction. This code refers to the engine cooling fan circuit as it experiences a malfunction, causing the fan to fail and allowing the engine to overheat.

  • P0480 is a general OBD2 trouble code that refers to the a malfunction within the cooling fan control circuit. This code is similar to P0481 and P0482 codes. What the P0480 code means P0480 means that the cooling fan 1 control circuit has a malfunction.

What can cause a radiator fan to not work?

The most common reasons a radiator fan is not working are luckily due to a blown fuse, bad relay, or a broken wire. It can also be caused by a faulty coolant temp sensor, low coolant level or the fan itself can be damaged.

How do I fix code P0480?

How To Correct P0480 Cooling Fan Relay 1 Control Circuit

  1. Repair or replace the faulty cooling fan 1.
  2. Replace the frayed vehicle speed sensor.
  3. Replace the inoperative AC pressure switch.
  4. Repair the faulty electrical connections.
  5. Repair or replace the defective fan wiring harness.
  6. Replace the engine coolant temperature sensor.

Can I drive with one radiator fan not working?

Yes, technically your engine does not need a cooling fan to operate. If the radiator does not have cool air blowing on it constantly, it will overheat eventually, so you’d need the perfect combination of weather and traffic to drive effectively without a radiator fan.

How do you know if your radiator fan switch is bad?

The best way to tell if your cooling switch is faulty is to listen to your engine while you drive. You know how your engine is supposed to sound, and if you notice that you don’t hear the fan as often as you normally do during your afternoon commute, you might have a failing switch.

How do I test my radiator fan?

How to Check a Radiator Fan

  1. Determine whether your radiator fan is manual or electric.
  2. To check an electric radiator fan, start the car and let it get up to the temperature where the fan normally kicks on.
  3. Use the volt meter to test if there is power to the wires.
  4. Normal voltage for a radiator fan is around 12 volts.

How do I know if my fan control module is bad?

Symptoms of a Cooling Fan Module Failure

  1. An overheating engine. When the cooling fan module fails completely, the cooling fans will not work at all.
  2. Cooling fans running non-stop.
  3. Poor circulation of fresh air in the cabin of the car.

Where is the cooling fan sensor?

The cooling fan control module in your vehicle is located at the front left of the engine compartment next to the radiator.

How do I fix code P0481?

What repairs can fix the P0481 code?

  1. Inspect the electrical connections to the cooling fan and relay to insure they are attached.
  2. Disconnect it, inspect the connections for corrosion or other issues, and then reinstall to insure a fresh electrical connection.

What is the fan control circuit?

Fan-control circuits range from simple switches that boost the fan speed at a certain temperature, to digitally controlled fans with continuously-variable speed. This circuit delivers a continuous and linear fan-control voltage that is proportional to temperature.

How long can a car run without a radiator fan?

Typically, you would be alright for the first 5–7 miles or about 2.5 minutes which is when the thermostat opens up and you can get heat. At that point turn your heater on fully, which will help cool the coolant. As long as you drive around 40 MPH then the engine should stay within a safe temp range.

Can a bad thermostat cause radiator fan not to work?

Broken Thermostat Thermostats are known to go bad and cause all sorts of cooling issues. If this thermostat doesn’t open when the engine reaches the working temperature, the coolant will stay inside the engine block and the engine will start to overheat. This will result in the radiator fan not working.

Can you drive without a fan clutch?

You will be fine, I had Trailblazer SS that I drove for 2 weeks with no fan while I waited for a tune update in the wintertime.

How do you test a radiator fan control module?

You can test the cooling fan temperature switch using a test light.

  1. Connect your test light to battery ground.
  2. Start and idle the engine, and backprobe the connector terminals with the test light.
  3. Wait for the engine to reach operating temperature.
  4. Now backprobe the other wire at the connector.

Error Code P0480: Cooling Fan Relay 1 Control Circuit

Cooling Fan 1 Control Circuit Malfunction is defined as the cause of Error Code P0480. Because the engine cooling fan circuit is experiencing a malfunction, this code is shown. This failure causes the fan to fail, resulting in the engine overheating. This is a general problem code, which means that it applies to any vehicle equipped with an OBD-II scanner, as well as automobiles manufactured from 1996 to the current day. Of course, the specifications for the definition, diagnosis, and repairs differ from one make/model to the next, as well.

See also:  How to use a scan tool?

Definition

During the course of our driving, a sufficient volume of air goes through the radiator, which efficiently cools the engine and other components. It is impossible for any air to travel through the radiator if the vehicle is not in motion. This is where the fans come into play – they are designed to provide adequate cooling for both the radiator and the engine in order to prevent them from overheating. Through the CTS (coolant temperature sensor), which is placed near the thermostat, the PCM (powertrain control module, also known as ECM or engine control module in other vehicle manufacturers) detects the rise in temperature.

If there is a fault inside the circuit that causes the fan to fail, the engine will heat up, perhaps causing it to overheat.

Essentially, the Error Code P0480 indicates that an issue has occurred in the cooling fan 1 control circuit, resulting in the fan malfunctioning.

Error Code P0480 refers to the basic circuit, and its related codes, Error Code P0481 and Error Code P0482, refer to an issue that is comparable to the basic circuit but is particular to distinct fan speed relays.

Common Symptoms

This error code has no visible symptoms other than the activation of the Check Engine light. The only noticeable symptom is an increase in engine temperature when driving or stopping the vehicle since the fans are not functioning to cool down the engine.

Possible Causes

There are a variety of causes that might cause this error code to appear. The following are some of the most prevalent probable causes:

  • The fan control relay 1 is defective
  • The cooling fan 1 is also faulty
  • The fan control relay harness is open or shorted
  • The fan cooling fan harness is open or shorted
  • Electrical connections in the cooling fan circuit that are faulty
  • Failure of the coolant temperature sensor
  • Failure of the IAT (intake air temperature)
  • VSS (vehicle speed sensor) failure
  • Faulty A/C selector switch
  • Faulty A/C refrigerant pressure sensor

How to Check

Mechanics utilize a scan tool to examine the PCM for any codes that may be present in order to troubleshoot this error code. They also take note of the freeze frame data, which depicts the vehicle’s characteristics at the time the code was established, such as the engine’s revolutions per minute (RPM), vehicle speed (VPS), and coolant temperature. Following that, they clear the codes and then take the car for a test drive in order to recreate the conditions that existed at the time the code was created.

This includes inspecting the fan’s operation and looking for any evidence of damage or wear and tear, among other things.

Then they can exchange the fan control relay with a good relay to test it or test the fan control relay with a tested relay. Following that, they examine the AC pressure switch to ensure that it is operating properly and that it is reading within specifications.

How to Fix

Fixes for this error code are very basic, and may, of course, be determined only after a comprehensive investigation of the situation. Some of the most common fixes are as follows:

  • Fixes for this error code are quite basic, and may, of course, be determined only after a comprehensive investigation of the problem. The following are some of the most common fixes:

Repairs for this error number are rather basic and quick, and they may be obtained from a thorough diagnostic, which is always recommended. The following are some of the most common repairs:

P0480 – Cooling Fan Relay but weird.

02 Feb 2014, 04:33 pm
Re: P0480 – Cooling Fan Relay but weird.


Robert, I don’t pretend to know your answer, but I do have questions: YES the 2006 to 2008 (and maybe more) radiator fan is supposed to have TWO relays near the top of the fan (as you have seen in pictures). Those relays attach to electrical connections near the top of the fan. Do you NOT have those two connections that attach to the relays that are supposed to be on the fan? If not, and you do buy a 2006+ radiator fan with the relays attached, you don’t have the electrical connection to go to those relays, correct?If you don’t have those connections, somebody jury rigged something so the fan would work without the relays (attached) and that’s why it’s running without the relay in the distribution box. Maybe somebody bought the wrong fan (01-05) and did some work on the car so the fan would run?Don’t know if I made myself clear or not but you are right saying the fan should NOT run with the relay out of the dist box.unless someone might have done something to get it to run.


Last edited by CREWZIN; 02 Feb 2014 at04:36 pm.

Radiator fans not running at all (P0480)

:thumbup: Unfortunately, precise fuse schematics for 2006-2007 automobiles are difficult to come by. Yes, absolutely. Nonetheless, if you look for the paper titled “Overview of fuse and relay locations.pdf,” you will find that the positions are well labeled and easy to find. In this case, the problem is that some of the assignments aren’t particularly useful in terms of identifying and correlating problems to fuses. For example, the fuse (SB53) that I misplaced is assigned to the “J519-Control unit for the onboard power supply (terminal 75 supply).

These tasks are especially difficult to go through because many of them aren’t used at all in my automobile, which makes it difficult to keep up.

Take a picture of the fuse panel before you start pulling fuses is something I will do from now on every time I remove fuses.

If I had known that, I would have saved a lot of time today!

Code P0480 – Cooling fan relay – replaced once, already.

:thumbup: That proper fuse diagrams for 2006-2007 vehicles are difficult to come by is a disappointment. Without a doubt. Nonetheless, if you look for the paper titled “Overview of fuse and relay locations.pdf,” you will find that the positions are well labeled and easy to understand. When it comes to linking an issue to a fuse, some of the assignments aren’t particularly helpful in doing so. Take, for example, the fuse (SB53) that I accidentally misplaced “Unit for onboard supply control (J519-Onboard Supply Control) (terminal 75 supply).

Many of these tasks aren’t even utilized in my automobile, which makes it difficult to navigate through them.

Take a picture of the fuse panel before you start removing fuses is something I’ll do from now on every time.

Having done so, I could have saved a lot of time today.

P0480 – How to Diagnose 3.6 PWM Fan Issues

The forums have been explored extensively, and while I have discovered some topics that are similar to my problem, none of them have led me to a solution. Please accept my apologies in advance if my search engine skills were insufficient: It happened this past weekend on my 2015 JKU, which produced a P0480 code, which indicates a problem with the Fan Control Circuit. Following the occurrence of the code, my Jeep began to overheat when idling in a parking lot, and I have subsequently discovered that the radiator fan is never turned on at all.

According to what I’ve discovered, the fan on the 3.6L is controlled by a pulse-width modulated exciter signal from the TIPM module. Trying to figure out where the problem is coming from is proving difficult for me. Here’s what I’ve accomplished thus far:

  • I’ve verified that the J19 60A fuse is in good working order. I’m able to maintain consistency. However, I’ve examined the K11 low-radiator-fan relay within the TIPM, and it opens as predicted and has very low resistance, so it appears to be in fine working order
  • I’ve replaced it just in case, with no noticeable difference
  • I also looked at the two 56055667AB fan relays that are located near the master cylinder in front of the driver’s seat. They were both OK. Even though I’m not entirely clear how they’re connected to the fan’s wiring, they’re listed as an official Mopar item with the designation “fan relay” on the packaging. The blower fan, rather than the radiator fan, was a possibility, so I disconnected the harness leading to it (near the radiator cap) and confirmed that it is delivering a solid 12V signal and is grounded (though I can’t say with certainty that the ground is super solid
  • I’ve seen a couple reports of faulty grounds with the fuse-able link
  • I’m going to try and double check that)
  • I’ve disconnected the harness leading to it (near the radiator cap) and confirmed that it

I’ve run into a snag with the following:

  • In this particular instance, I’m at a loss:

In summary, before I invest money on either the TIPM or the fan repair, I’d prefer some method to check that both or neither sides are failing. Why there are two “high” fan relays on the driver’s side of the engine compartment (or if those are even related) as well as a “low” fan relay and the purpose it serves is still a mystery to me, especially since there is also an always-on large gauge power line directly to the fan on the passenger’s side of the engine compartment. When it comes to fan speed flexibility, I would have imagined that the PWM was in charge of it, and that any relays were integrated into the 400 dollar fan assembly itself – given that is the tradeoff of this design in comparison to the 3.8L ones.

However, if anyone has any experience with the later JK cooling system, advice or diagnostic tips would be greatly appreciated!

Both radiator fans not running (P0480)

In my 2007 Volkswagen Passat 2.0T, my daughter accidentally ran her nose on one of those parking lot bumpers, causing the car to stall. There was some tearing off of the undertray and a little messing up of the side skirts, but it was nothing major. However, it also bent the shaft of the auxiliary radiator fan motor, causing the fan to become trapped against the shroud and unable to turn any further. According to reports, there was a lot of smoke since the fan motor had burned out. When I was driving back home (a short distance), the car blew a CEL and saved the code P0480 “Coolan Fan Control Circuit 1.” By the way, I wasn’t present for any of this.

  1. It didn’t operate at all when I tried to run the old auxiliary fan with the bent shaft by applying 12v straight to its connector.
  2. So I went out and purchased a new shroud/fan/controller unit, which I have just installed.
  3. In my quest for information, I discovered that the J239 fan controller is a component of the bigger main fan system.
  4. If there is a problem, I would be happy to change it if someone could show out where it is located.
  5. I recognize that it’s conceivable that one of the two Engine Coolant Temperature Sensors is faulty, but I don’t see how they could have been damaged in the collision (they aren’t located towards the bottom of the car).
  6. Other than that, the only other thing that comes to mind is that the replacement fan assembly is genuinely defective.
  7. On my new device, however, this is not the case at all.
  8. I’m not sure how to test the J239 controller on the new fan assembly since I’m not sure what to look for.
  9. Sorry, I’m not sure which terminal is supposed to be number 1, 2, 3, or 4, so I simply labeled them with the colors of the wires that are coming in from the back of this connector.
  10. I’m not getting any voltage across BR-Bl.
  11. So I’m not sure if there is still an unsolved issue with the car, which was created by the aux fan motor catching fire, or if the replacement fan/shroud assembly is just defective.

I had to purchase the fan/shroud component from Rockauto, and I don’t want to risk returning it and having to replace it with another unit if it isn’t completely faulty first. Can somebody provide me with any other information on how to diagnose this?

Error Code P0480 – Fan 1 control circuit

My air conditioner, which was installed in 2013, has begun to fail me. Specifically, while the computer is idle. When the A/C is turned on, the coolant temperature might reach 210 degrees Fahrenheit or more. The engine begins to overheat till I switch off the air conditioning. It will begin to cool off as soon as I begin to move more quickly. After I begin to move away from idle, I can hear the air conditioning compressor turning on. My Cobb AP has Error Code P0480 – Fan 1 control circuit, which I discovered when I reviewed the error codes.

  • Is there anyone else who has seen this error code, and if so, what caused it and how did you resolve it?
  • How can I do a more thorough investigation to determine the source of the problem?
  • It’s a drag not having decent air conditioning in Southwest Florida.
  • I started by checking the fuses, fan relay, and mega fuses to see if they were tripped.
  • I also checked that the fan itself would turn on and off at specific times, indicating that the problem was not with the fan motor itself.
  • Pictures can be seen in the previous remark.

P0480 – cooling fan issues – troubleshooting help

My air conditioner, which was installed in 2013, has begun to fail me on a consistent basis. I’m talking about when you’re just sitting around. When the A/C is turned on, the coolant temperature might reach 210 degrees Fahrenheit. After turning off the air conditioning, the engine begins to overheat and eventually fails. It will begin to cool off as soon as I begin to move more rapidly. After I begin to move away from idle, I can hear the A/C compressor turning on. P0480 – Fan 1 control circuit is the error code I received when I examined my Cobb AP’s error codes.

Is there anyone else who has seen this error code, and if so, what caused it and how did you resolve the problem?

In order to determine the cause of the problem, I must do an additional investigation.

Because of the heat in Southwest Florida, it is difficult to keep the air conditioning running properly.

The fuses, fan relay, and mega fuses were all tested as part of the investigation.

I also checked that the fan itself would turn on and off at specific times, indicating that it was not the fan motor itself that was causing the problems.

The only thing left was the module, so I got a used one off of eBay and changed it out, and the fan now operates as it should! Pictures may be found in the last remark.

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