2010 Ford Explorer Sensor Locations?

  • Camshaft position sensors (CMP) (located at the front of the driver side cylinder head) Heated Oxygen Sensor HO2S11 (located in the passenger side exhaust manifold) Knock sensor (KS) (located on the top of the engine under the intake manifold

How many O2 sensors does a 2010 Ford Explorer have?

All 4 O2 sensors 3 Answers.

Where is the PCM located on a 2010 Ford Explorer?

Powertrain Control Module (PCM) (6L) Right side of engine. Rear Wiper Module Center of liftgate.

Where is the O2 sensor located on a 2007 Ford Explorer?

Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) #21 (4.6L) left exhaust pipe, before catalytic converter. Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) #22 (4.0L) right exhaust pipe, after catalytic converter.

Where is the oxygen sensor located on a Ford Explorer?

Oxygen sensors are located before and after the catalytic converter. A vehicle may have two to five oxygen sensors, and sometimes even more.

Where is the bank 1 on the Ford Explorer?

3 Answers. Bank 1 is the rear bank on your engine. where the number 1 cylinder is located, is bank 1. The right side should be rear bank==bank 1.

Where is the ECM computer located?

In most vehicles, the ECM is located in the engine compartment. Some vehicles have the ECM mounted under the driver’s or passenger seat, however.

Where is the ECM located on a Ford Explorer?

The ECM is located behind the kick panel, in front of the passenger door, below the glove box, to the right of the passengers feet.

How many O2 sensors does a 2010 Ford Escape have?

The Ford Escape has two oxygen sensors on it for its four cylinder engine. There is one that is on the exhaust before the catalytic converter and one that is after. You can find them since they are screwed into bungs that are welded onto Your headers and exhaust.

Where are the O2 sensors on a 2013 Ford Explorer?

The 2013 Ford Explorer oxygen sensor is located on the exhaust at the catalytic converter.

Where is the upstream O2 sensor located?

The upstream oxygen sensor is located before the catalytic converter. This measures the level of pollutants coming directly from the engine. It also senses any raw, unburned fuel coming from the combustion chambers.

How do you reset the check engine light after changing O2 sensor?

Turn the ignition to the “On” position but don’t crank the engine (it won’t start anyway). Wait five minutes and reinsert the fuse. The “Check Engine” light will blink, then shut off.

How many O2 sensors does a 2000 Ford Explorer have?

You have 3 oxygen sensors, 2 in the collector and one after the cat.

Where is the O2 sensor on a 2006 Ford Explorer?

The oxygen sensor helps keep that balance in check. The sensor is typically located on the passenger side of the car, mounted directly onto the exhaust pipe near the catalytic converter.

2010 Ford Explorer Module Locations

WARNING: The terminal and harness assignments for particular connections will differ based on the degree of vehicle equipment, the model, and the market in which the vehicle is sold.

Find lots of other information for your Ford Vehicle.To find fuse diagrams,click hereTo find Relay locations,click hereTo find Sensor Locations,click hereTo find Module Locations,click hereTo find Switch Locations,click hereTo find Firing Order,click here

Control Module for the Anti-Lock Braking System The engine compartment is accessed from the left front. The Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) Module is located on the left-hand side of the engine compartment. The HVAC unit’s Blower Motor Speed Control Center is located here. Module for the Driver’s Seat It’s time to take the wheel. Module for the EGR System The very top of the engine. Fuel Pump Driver Module (with the exception of Sport Trac) is located on the right “D” pillar. The Fuel Pump Driver Module (Sport Trac) is located at the right rear of the car.

HVAC Module (DATC) is located in the center of the dashboard.

  • The seat in front of the driver.
  • Passenger Air Bag Module is an acronym that stands for Passenger Air Bag Module.
  • Steering column with an anti-theft passive transceiver.
  • Powertrain Control Module (PCM) (0L) located on the right side of the engine block.
  • The rear wiper module is located in the center of the liftgate.
  • Roof Opening Panel Module Located in the center of the roof’s front panel.
  • The Side Air Bag Module (Left) is located on the left side of the driver’s seat back.
  • Brake Control Module for Trailers with Electronic Brakes The dash is on the left-hand side.

The Oxygen Sensor on a Ford Explorer V8 is in the exhaust pipe

courtesy of Drazen_ / Getty Images Oxygen sensors are standard equipment on all new automobiles and other vehicles manufactured after 1980. Built to improve the efficiency of the engine, these oxygen sensors provide vital information to the vehicle’s internal computer, allowing the vehicle to run more efficiently while also emitting less carbon dioxide. The combustion of gasoline requires the presence of oxygen. The optimal gas-to-oxygen ratio is 14.7:1 (gas to oxygen). If there is less oxygen available than that, there may be surplus fuel left over in the wrong spot.

The oxygen sensor aids in the modulation of the combustion process, ensuring that the engine is operating at the proper ratio.

Location of the Oxygen Sensor

The oxygen sensor is located in the exhaust pipe of today’s automobiles. The sensor is absolutely necessary: The computer in the automobile would be unable to compensate for variables such as height, temperature, and other considerations if this was not there.

The automobile will continue to function even if the oxygen sensor fails, but you may notice a decrease in driving performance as well as a higher rate of fuel consumption.

The Ford Explorer V8

It is particularly crucial to consider fuel economy and oxygen sensors when it comes to the Ford Explorer V8. The Ford Explorer is a huge SUV that has room for up to seven passengers in comfort. When the rear seats are folded flat, there is more than 80 cubic feet of cargo space available, which is more than enough to transport weekend-related stuff. The Ford Explorer, when equipped with the tow package, is capable of towing heavy loads of up to 5,000 pounds. It has more than 280 horsepower, making it a very powerful vehicle.

It achieves just 17 miles per gallon in city driving and 24 miles per gallon on the interstate, according to the manufacturer.

Otherwise, your gas cost will increase, and the performance of your Explorer may suffer as a result.

Ford Explorer V8 Sensor Locations

M93/Flickr Diagrams illustrating the position of the Ford Explorer’s oxygen sensors, as well as movies, are accessible on the internet. For example, if your engine is displaying a code such as PO153 “Upstream hot O2 sensor circuit sluggish response Bank 2,” you’ll need to locate the oxygen sensor locations in order to replace the failed unit. In the engine, Bank 1 corresponds to the side of the engine that contains Cylinder 1. The illustrations show the Ford V8 numbering scheme for O2 sensors, which is used by the company.

Fixing the Oxygen Sensor

The most typical reason for the check engine light to illuminate is a malfunctioning oxygen sensor. Investing the time to resolve the problem early on can save you money, time, and aggravation in the long run. It is probable that you will need to take your vehicle to a repair shop to get it fixed. They will connect your car’s computer to their system and check to see what codes are shown. This will inform them and you of the nature of the problem, and you can then determine how to continue. The oxygen sensor may occasionally indicate that something else is amiss with the vehicle, but the sensor itself may become worn out over time.

Ford 4.0L SOHC V6 Engine Sensor Locations – TroubleCodes.net

View of the engine with the decorative engine cover removed. Ford Ranger 4.0L SOHC (Supercharged)

  1. There are many sensors in the engine: fuel injectors (placed below the intake manifold), mass airflow sensor (MAF), and camshaft position sensors (CMP) (positioned at the front of the driver’s side cylinder head). The following sensors are located in the passenger side exhaust manifold: the knock sensor (KS), which is located on the top of the engine under the intake manifold
  2. The crankshaft position sensor (CKP), which is located at the front of the engine near the crankshaft pulley
  3. The engine coolant temperature sensor (ECT), which is located under the intake manifold
  4. The ignition coil
  5. The Differential Pressure Feedback EGR Sensor (DPFE)
  6. The idle air control valve (IAC)
  7. The throttle position sensor

Models Found On

  • Among the models available are the Ford Ranger (2001–2012), the Mazda B4000 (2001–2010), the Ford Explorer (1997) and the Mercury Mountaineer (2007–2010)
  • The Ford Courier (2004–2006)
  • The Ford Mustang (2005–2010)
  • And the Land Rover LR3 (2005–2009).

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Ford Explorer Check Engine Light

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Check Engine Light Service Ford Explorer

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How much does it cost to get the engine light checked?

The check engine light can indicate a variety of problems, from a loose gas cap to a more dangerous failure, such as a faulty catalytic converter or a problem with one of the car’s oxygen sensors, so it’s important to obtain the proper code reading and diagnostic as soon as possible. The average cost of a check engine light diagnosistesting is consistently between $88 and $111, with the highest cost being $111.

For your convenience, Bill Estes Ford Brownsburg offers comprehensive multi-point inspections as well as free diagnostics, which are usually available to assist you in determining the source of your check engine light.

Ford Explorer Check Engine Light Flashing

We know from years of delivering Check Engine Light Diagnosis Service that there are various natural explanations for an illuminated Check Engine Light, including something as inconspicuous as a loose gas cap, which can cause the light to illuminate. Some of the other natural causes of a Check Engine Light are a broken oxygen sensor, a faulty emissions control part, an abrasive or filthy mass airflow sensor, a malfunction with the fuel injection system, or defective spark plugs, to mention a few.

When this occurs, the Check Engine Light is turned off, and you may walk out of the repair shop certain that your Ford problem has been resolved.

The sensors are naturally detecting and transmitting data to the electronic control unit while doing their jobs.

However, that is the limitation of the Check Engine Light – it will not tell you what precisely is wrong with your vehicle, nor will it tell you what to do to fix it.

Ford Explorer Check Engine Light

If the check engine light on your Ford Explorer begins to flash, it indicates that there is a problem that requires immediate attention, and your vehicle should be taken in as soon as possible. A flashing light warns that the situation is perilous, and that if it is not addressed immediately, it might result in significant damage to the vehicle. When this indicator blinks, it typically means that there has been a catastrophic engine misfire, enabling unburned gasoline to be spilled into the exhaust system.

Some owners wonder if spark plugs are responsible for the check engine light flashing.

It is possible for the engine to misfire if the spark plug is faulty, old or unclean.

Immediately notify our staff of automotive advisers at Bill Estes Ford Brownsburg if your check engine light is illuminated by calling 3177903264 or stopping by our dealership.

What Does the Check Engine Light Mean?

The check engine light on your Ford Explorer is one of the most frequently misinterpreted lights or indications on the vehicle. The check engine light is a component of the onboard diagnostics system, and it can appear in a variety of configurations. An engine symbol, a message such as “Check Engine,” or a mix of the two are all possible with a check engine sign. Depending on the color of the light, it will either be amber or red. It is a component of the diagnostics system present in your car.

Some of them include timing the ignition, changing automatic gearboxes, managing the engine speed, and incorporating stability control, to mention a few of the numerous possibilities.

It might be anything as simple as your gas cap being loose or something as harmful as your engine banging.

Make contact with Bill Estes Ford Brownsburg right away!

Is it safe to drive your Ford Explorer with the check engine light on?

If your Ford Explorer’s check engine light is on and flashing, this indicates that there is a severe problem with the vehicle, and it is suggested that you service your Ford Explorer immediately. This is a difficult topic to answer because the degree of the problem varies from person to person and from situation to situation. If the underlying problem is a small one, such as a loose gas cap, the vehicle should be covered while the problem is resolved. The check engine light will normally remain illuminated for an extended period of time.

Please contact the specialists at Bill Estes Ford Brownsburg by contacting 3177903264 so that you can detail the troubles you are experiencing.

How many miles can you drive with the check engine light?

If your Ford Explorer’s check engine light is on and flashing, this indicates that there is a severe problem with the vehicle, and it is suggested that you fix it immediately. Due to the fact that each answer is dependent on the severity of the problem, this question is not straightforward. If the underlying problem is a small one, such as a loose gas cap, the vehicle should be safeguarded while the problem is corrected. As a general rule, the check engine light will remain on for an extended period of time.

Call the professionals at Bill Estes Ford Brownsburg at 3177903264 so that you can explain the situation. Alternatively, slow down and transport your Ford to one of our qualified specialists as soon as possible.

Ford Explorer Check Engine Light Codes

If your Ford Explorer’s check engine light is flashing, this indicates that there is a severe problem with the vehicle, and it is suggested that you service your Ford Explorer immediately. This is a difficult topic to answer because the intensity of the problem varies from person to person. If the problem is a small one, such as a loose gas cap, it should be possible to continue driving. The check engine light will normally remain illuminated for a prolonged period of time. The performance of your vehicle may have changed, which might be an indicator of a more serious problem.

Alternatively, limit your speed and transport your Ford to one of our qualified experts as soon as is reasonably possible.

  • If your Ford Explorer’s check engine light is flashing, this indicates that there is a severe problem with the vehicle, and it is suggested that you service your Ford Explorer as soon as possible. This is a difficult topic to answer because each answer is dependent on the severity of the problem. If the reason is a small issue, such as a loose gas cap, the vehicle should be safeguarded while the problem is resolved. This is often indicated by a persistent glow of the check engine light. If you observe a variation in the performance of your car, it might be a sign of a more serious problem. Call the specialists at Bill Estes Ford Brownsburg at 3177903264 so that you can discuss the problems. Alternatively, limit your speed and send your Ford to our professional specialists as soon as possible.

The fact that someone who does not have a lot of automotive understanding does not automatically presume what a code implies is a huge plus for them. When your check engine light illuminates, you should schedule an appointment with a skilled Ford repair as soon as possible. Make a call to Bill Estes Ford Brownsburg at 3177903264 or book your check engine light service online right now! If the engine light illuminates due to a potentially dangerous problem, you run the risk of further harming your vehicle if you do not address the problem immediately.

What could cause the check engine light to come on in a Ford Explorer?

When your check engine light turns on, it might mean that you need to tighten or replace your gas cap, which is quite acceptable. Similarly, the check engine light might also be a warning sign of a serious problem that could result in significant damage to your engine and an exorbitant repair expense. The check engine light will either glow or blink depending on your vehicle’s make and model. An engine that runs smoothly and regularly signifies nothing to be concerned about, but a check engine light that flashes signals your vehicle’s engine is in critical condition and servicing must be performed immediately.

The following is a summary of the most heartfelt reasons why your check engine light may be illuminated:

  • One of the most common most common reasons for this is because the gas cap on your Ford Explorer is loose, broken, or completely missing. The gas cap on your Ford Explorer performs a number of different functions. In addition to preventing gas fumes from being emitted when you are not driving, it also helps to maintain pressure within the fuel tank by securing the fuel system. What happens if you have a faulty gasoline cap on your vehicle? If your gas cap has been in place for a long time or has a burst seal, you may experience gasoline loss due to evaporation, resulting in repeated journeys to the gas station. Fortunately, replacing a gas cap is not a costly endeavor. If your Ford Explorer’s check engine light illuminates immediately after you fill the tank with gas, the first thing you should check is to ensure that the cap is not loose — or that it is still on the car’s roof or at the fuel pump
  • The battery is low or dead
  • Or the transmission is damaged. The battery in your Ford Explorer is a complete and utter mystery. Your car won’t start, it won’t illuminate the road ahead, it won’t play the radio, and it won’t charge your phone if it doesn’t have a battery. Car batteries today last far longer than they did many decades ago, and they require little to no maintenance. New Fords range in price depending on the model you drive, but you may save money by taking advantage of our current servicing discounts and promotions. A new O2 Sensor (Oxygen Sensor) is required for your vehicle. The oxygen sensor, often known as the O2 sensor, is responsible for measuring the amount of oxygen present in your exhaust system. The presence of excessive oxygen in your exhaust system causes gasoline to burn more quickly, resulting in a vehicle that is less productive in terms of fuel efficiency. As a result, what will happen if I do not replace your oxygen sensor? An incorrectly functioning sensor can not only reduce your miles per gallon, but it can also cause damage to your catalytic converter and the spark plugs in your Ford Explorer. The oxygen sensor transmits data to the vehicle’s onboard computer, which uses the information to ensure that the right combination of air and fuel is introduced into the engine’s cylinders. Another problem that might cause an automobile to fail an emissions test is a faulty oxygen sensor
  • Your Ford Explorer has a vacuum leak. Every Ford Explorer is equipped with a vacuum system that is capable of performing a wide range of tasks. The vacuum system also aids in the reduction of harmful emissions by directing fumes away from the engine when fuel evaporates through it. Whether your engine’s RPM is high at idle or surges at random, a vacuum leak might be the source of the problem. Vacuum hoses can dry up and break over time, particularly if they’re subjected to high heat or cold for an extended period of time.
  • There are problems with any aftermarket parts. If an aftermarket alarm, exhaust, or alternative item is not fitted correctly, it might cause serious damage to your Ford Explorer. These aftermarket components and accessories have the potential to damage the battery, cause the check engine light to illuminate, or even prevent the vehicle from starting altogether. If these problems seem familiar, bring your Explorer to Ford and let our team of qualified mechanics check to make sure your aftermarket parts were fitted correctly and aren’t creating any problems. Getting accessories, particularly aftermarket parts and accessories, or utilizing OEM components in the first place may cost a little more money up front, but it will save you money in the long run by avoiding the expense of having to rectify faulty work and damage caused by poor installation work. Your catalytic converter has failed or is about to fail. This component of your Ford Explorer’s exhaust system is called a catalytic converter. One of the functions of the catalytic converter is to convert the carbon monoxide produced during the combustion process into carbon dioxide. When it comes to broken catalytic converters, negligence is usually to blame, which is why Bill Estes Ford Brownsburg includes a comprehensive multi-point check with every Ford service. If you have a problem with your catalytic converter and don’t get it fixed, your Ford Explorer will fail an emissions test, will have poor engine performance, and will have a severe impact on your fuel efficiency. A greater operating temperature may also be experienced by your vehicle, which may result in mechanical difficulties caused by overheating
  • Your mass airflow sensor (also known as MAF) may need to be changed. The mass airflow sensor in your Ford Explorer is responsible for determining how much fuel is required to run your engine effectively. It does this by measuring the amount of air that enters the engine. The mass airflow sensor, which is a component of the engine management system, assists the engine in responding to changes in the environment, such as altitude. This might be an indication of a malfunctioning mass airflow sensor in your Ford Explorer if your vehicle is having difficulties starting, idling rough, or changing the position of the throttle pedal quickly. New Spark Plugs or Plug Wires are required for your Ford Explorer. The spark plugs in your vehicle’s engine are the components that ignite the air/fuel combination in the combustion chamber of the vehicle’s engine. This explosion is responsible for the movement of the pistons and the operation of the engine. The spark plug wires are responsible for delivering the spark from the ignition coil to the spark plugs in the engine. If your spark plugs or spark plug wires are damaged or have been in use for a long period of time, you may notice poor performance and lower power. Occasionally, your engine will have difficulty starting or continuing to operate in certain severe circumstances. A blocked catalytic converter or damage to ignition coils and oxygen sensors can be caused by worn spark plugs and plug wires, resulting in more expensive repairs at the end of the day.
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Will the check engine light reset itself?

If the problem or code that caused the check engine light to illuminate is resolved, the check engine light on your Ford Explorer will turn off more frequently. For example, if a loose gas cap was the reason of your check engine light going on, once the cap is tightened, the light will turn off by itself within a few minutes. Likewise, if your catalytic converter is in good working order and you’ve been doing a lot of stop-and-go driving, the check engine light may have come on as a result of the excessive amount of time the converter has been put through its paces.

It is necessary to bring the vehicle in to Bill Estes Ford Brownsburg if you commute more than that amount and the light is still on. This will allow the light and code to be double-checked and the vehicle to be reset.

TPMS: 2006-2010 Ford Escape, Explorer, Explorer Sport Trac and Freestar

VEHICLES IN DISCUSSION: Ford Escape 2006-09; Ford Explorer 2006-10; Ford Explorer Sport Trac 2007-10; Ford Freestar 2006-08; and Ford Freestar 2006-08. WHAT IS THE RELEARN PROCEDURE? Yes. ARE SPECIAL TOOLS REQUIRED? Yes. A TPMS activation tool (204-363) as well as a digital tire gauge are included (204-354). TPMS stands for tire pressure monitoring system, and it is found on the Ford Escape (2006-09), the Explorer (2006-10), the Explorer Sport Trac (2007-10), and the Freestar (2006-08). The TPMS monitors the air pressure in the four road tires by the use of wheel-mounted tire pressure sensors.

When the vehicle is stationary, the sensors transmit radio frequency signals every six hours.

After determining if the tire pressure has gone below this limit, the SJB sends a message to the instrument cluster, which flashes the low pressure warning indication and displays the corresponding message(s) in the message center if applicable (if equipped.) Tire pressure sensors are battery-operated devices that are fitted to metal brackets (referred to as cradles) on the wheels and within the tires.

The sensors are positioned on the valve stem at an angle of 180 degrees.

It is possible that the TPMS will not operate effectively in the following circumstances:

  • There is insufficient tire pressure
  • The tire pressure sensor is absent or broken
  • A spare tire is used as a road wheel in this configuration. It has been determined that an erroneous tire pressure sensor has been placed. An error has occurred during the installation of the tire pressure sensor. Wheels that are not original equipment manufacturers (aftermarket rims) are mounted. Run-flat tires that are not OEM-equipped have been mounted. There are other non-OEM modifications (roll cages, service barriers, component racks, ladder racks, and so on) that may be added to a vehicle.

Indicators for the tire pressure monitoring system NOTE: Every 6 degrees Celsius (10 degrees Fahrenheit) fall in ambient temperature results in a 1 psi reduction in tire pressure (7 kPa). If tire pressures are not adjusted while the tires are still cold, the tire pressure may decrease to the point where the TPMS detects it and the low pressure warning light will on on the dashboard. The tire pressure warning light illuminates and the message center shows “LOW TIRE PRESSURE.” Check the air pressure in each tire and adjust to the specified cold pressure indicated on the vehicle certification label (located on the driver’s door or door pillar) when the warning light comes on.

  1. Check to see that the warning light is turned off.
  2. Consult the servicing information provided by the manufacturer.
  3. Consult the servicing information provided by the manufacturer.
  4. NOTE: If the tire pressure sensor is changed, it will need to be re-trained to function correctly.
  5. Check to see that the warning light is turned off.
  6. NOTE: The TPM Activation Tool (204-363) must be used in the following method to be successful.
  7. RF noise is created by the functioning of electrical motors and appliances, cellular cellphones and remote transmitters, power inverters, and portable entertainment devices, among other things.
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Once the sensor has been turned on, it must be inflated to the specified inflation pressure and allowed to sit for at least two minutes before continuing with the sensor training method.

Then, press and release the brake pedal several times.

Do not allow more than one minute to go between each key press.

4) Depress the ignition switch until it is in the OFF position.

6) Do not allow more than one minute to go between each key press.

During this period, the activation tool must be held at an angle of 180 degrees to the valve stem to ensure proper operation (see Figure 1).

If the sensor continues to be unresponsive, reposition the vehicle such that the wheels are rotated at least one-fourth of a turn and try to activate the same sensor again.

A warning bell will be sounded twice and the message center (if provided) will show “TIRE NOT TRAINED REPEAT” throughout the tire training operation.

6) If the train mode has been properly activated, the horn will sound once and the tire pressure warning light will flash (if fitted, the message center will display “TRAIN LF TIRE”).

The horn will sound for a brief period of time to signal that the tire pressure sensor has been detected by the SJB.

Seven minutes after the horn sounds, position the activation tool on the right front tire wall, 180 degrees away from the valve stem, within two minutes of the horn sounding.

The message center (if one is available) will display “TIRE TRAINING MODE COMPLETE” after the tire training operation is complete.

if the horn sounds even after the ignition is switched off, this indicates that the training operation was unsuccessful Procedures for demounting and remounting CAUTION: The tire should be demounted from the wheel in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions for the tire changer.

CAUTION: It is essential that the tire and wheel are always properly matched.

Failure to follow these directions may result in an explosive separation, which may result in significant bodily harm or death if not followed.

Tire pressure sensors are not intended for use with aftermarket wheels and should not be utilized with them.

When a wheel and tire assembly is fitted with a tire pressure sensor, the following language will be stamped or cast onto the wheel or tire assembly: “It’s possible that a sensor is within.” CAUTION: Retighten the wheel nuts every 500 miles (800 km) or whenever the wheel nuts get loosened, regardless of whether the wheels were changed.

  • WARNING: The use of run-flat tires on a vehicle that was not initially equipped with them is not recommended since it might cause the TPMS to malfunction.
  • Ford suggests that you use a digital or dial-type tire pressure gauge rather than a stick-type tire pressure gauge in order to get more accurate readings.
  • Components of the tire pressure monitoring system Part number for the application Sensor for tire pressure and sensor kit 1A150/1A189Strap/strap kit 1A150/1A189 1A177/1A193 Sensor cradle1A175 is a sensor cradle that holds a sensor.
  • Tire pressure monitoring system Precaution is advised: Tire pressure sensors are available in a variety of colors depending on their intended use.
  • The different colored sensors cannot be swapped out for one another.
  • Tire pressure sensors positioned on the valve and tire pressure sensors mounted on the strap are incompatible.
  • Tire pressure sensors are equipped with lithium-ion batteries, which must be disposed of in accordance with local regulations.

Removal 1) Remove the wheel and tire assembly from the vehicle.

Depending on the machine, the nylon roller bead separator may be located at the 12 o’clock position instead of the paddle-type bead separator located at the 3 o’clock position on some machines.

Place the wheel and tire assembly on a tire machine with the valve stem at the 6 o’clock or 12 o’clock position, then remove the tire beads from the wheel using an appropriate tire separating tool.

3) Position the wheel and tire assembly on the turntable of the tire machine so that the valve stem is between the 5 o’clock and 6 o’clock positions and the machine arm is at the 12 o’clock position, as shown in the illustration.

CAUTION: Do not use a big screwdriver or apply excessive force to the components in the next step, because damage to the components may result.

Disconnect the sensor from the cradle and remove the sensor from the system (see Figure 6).

1) Insert the hinge end of the sensor into the hook end of the cradle and press the other end of the sensor down into the cradle to secure it in place.

Take a look at Figure 7.

If the locking clip cannot be fully inserted, it is possible that the sensor is not entirely placed on the cradle or that the locking clip has been entered in the wrong direction.

3) Position the wheel on the tire machine’s turntable so that the tire pressure sensor is at the 6 o’clock position and the valve stem and machine arm are at the 12 o’clock position.

The use of anything other than soap and water to clean the tire pressure sensor may result in damage to the sensor.

NOTE: A new tire pressure sensor is sent in an OFF mode (also known as “battery saver mode”) and must be switched ON before it can be programmed to measure tire pressure.

NOTE: Do not inflate the tire to a pressure more than the maximum pressure shown on the tire sidewall.

6) Attach the wheel and tire assembly to the wheel and tire assembly.

Refer to the reset procedures.

All strap kits have the same basic part number, despite the fact that there are multiple various sizes of strap kits available dependent on wheel diameter.

Warning: The strap is under considerable stress.

When removing the band/strap, always wear safety goggles or a face shield as well as gloves to prevent personal damage. Continue to the following step if you want to remove the strap that was put by a dealer. Remove a factory-installed strap by following the steps outlined below:

  • Locate the buckle on the strap. Duct tape should be used to secure the strap to the wheel on both sides of the buckle, approximately 0.98 inch (25 mm) from the clasp. The strap should be unbuckled by using a big screwdriver and twisting action. Remove the strap and throw it away.

3) To remove a strap that has been placed by a dealer, crank the worm gear screw until the strap is completely free of the worm gear. Remove the strap and throw it away. NOTE: Prior to disassembly, indicate the location of the cradle to make reassembling it easier. 4) Remove the cradle by placing a screwdriver under the cradle and prying it up with the screwdriver or equivalent instrument. Installation The sensor is now properly positioned in the new cradle. To do so, insert the hinge end of the sensor into the hook end of the cradle and press one end of the sensor down into the cradle, as shown in Figure 1.

Take a look at Figure 7.

The sensor is marked with raised marks that indicate where the sensor should be placed.

3.

Then, using a wheel drop well, place the sensor and cradle 180 degrees away from the valve stem.

This will place the worm gear on the sensor’s locking clip side, allowing it to function properly (see Figure 9).

Ascertain that the strap is positioned in the lowest feasible location to ensure proper sensor and cradle retention.

Tighten the worm gear to 27 in.-lbs.

The tire pressure sensor should be at the 6 o’clock position, and the valve stem and machine arm should be at the 12 o’clock position, when the wheel is placed on the turntable of the tire machine.

The use of anything other than soap and water to clean the tire pressure sensor may result in damage to the sensor.

NOTE: A new tire pressure sensor is sent in an OFF mode (also known as “battery saver mode”) and must be switched ON before it can be programmed to measure tire pressure.

The tire should be inflated to the pressure indicated on the vehicle certification label (located on the driver door or door pillar).

9) Get the tire pressure sensors up to speed.

Retighten the wheel nuts every 500 miles (800 kilometers) or whenever the wheel nuts get loosened, or after each wheel replacement.

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www.tpms.org. For older TPMS articles, go to www.tpms.org. To view other TPMS columns, please visit: Hyundai Sonata (2008-2010), Subaru Legacy (2005-2013), and Subaru Outback (2005-2013). Ford Explorer (model years 2011-2013)

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