adding different weight oil? (Suits you)

Can oils of different grades be mixed? The good news is that mixing different types of oil it will not harm your engine in any way in the short run. Most synthetic and semi-synthetic engine oils are based on regular oil and are compatible.

  • Oil’s job is to remove heat, reduce friction and prevent corrosion. If you add a thicker or heavier weight oil to your engine, you actually increase friction and reduce the oil’s ability to remove heat. The result? Faster engine wear. Does heavier weight oil stop oil leaks?

Is it OK to mix different oil weights?

From the Chevron.com site: ‘Can I mix different viscosity grades of motor oils?’ ‘Yes. It is always advisable to not mix motor oil brands, however, different viscosity grades of the same brand motor oil are compatible.

Is it OK to mix 5W30 and 10W30?

No – you wont get the desired output by mixing these two oils. Because, both have different grades, 5w30 is more light and the density is less, and is intended for light usage (scooters). Whereas a 10w30 is a higer grade with more density and suitable for more higher capacity engines.

Can you mix 10W30 and 10/40 oil?

Mixing 10W30 with 10W40 Some say that mixing them is fine as long as you don’t live in freezing weather. Even if you put together synthetic and conventional blends of these motor oils, they show no harm to your vehicle.

Can I mix 5W20 and 5W30 oil?

You can mix a 5W20 with a 5W30 oil with minimal amount of issues provided it the same manufacturer and the same API classification. The question is ‘why would you?” If it is because you oil is low and the only thing available is a different grade then it might be fine until you can get it changed.

Can I mix 5w30 and 10w40?

No, especially if it’s a different manufacturer. The additives could react with each other. At least you should use the same brand, but 10w40 is a bad oil, and if the engine requires 5w30, the 10w40 is too thick. It’s also not good, because that oil has about a third of it as oil thickeners.

What happens if you mix two different engine oils?

Mixing different types can destabilize your motor oil, reducing its efficiency and affecting your engine’s performance. The smartest choice is to stick with the oil type and oil change intervals recommended by your car’s manufacturer and visit your local car care experts for affordable services.

Can you mix oil viscosities?

There is nothing wrong with mixing oils of two different viscosities, but it is not the optimum condition. You can also mix oils of the same type (engine oils with engine oils, etc.) Remember, when getting an oil change, 15 to 20% of the old oil remains in the engine and mixes with the new oil.

Can I mix engine oils?

Mineral, Semi Synthetic and Synthetic oils can all be mixed together, although this is not recommended. It is always best to use the same type, viscosity and manufacturer specification when topping up your engine oil.

Can you mix 30w and 10w30?

No. SAE 30 is a single viscosity motor oil. Only multi viscosity motor oils only should be used in any car.

What happens if you put 10W40 instead of 5w30?

If you use 10-w-40 instead of 5-w-30 specified by the manufacturer then the viscosity of 10-w- 40 used by you will be higher and oil thicker than what is specified during winters. Similarly the oil viscosity will be higher and oil thicker than specified during summers.

Will thicker oil damage my engine?

Using oil that is thicker than recommended may lead to a decrease in fuel economy, a higher load on your engine, and even a shorter life for your engine. Conversely, using thinner, lighter-weight oil than recommended can cause excessive wear and shorter life.

What happens if you put 10W40 instead of 10W30?

So if you change your oil from 10W30 to 10W40 you should take care about the weather in your surroundings. Changing from 10W30 to 10W40 will not do any effect on your engine if you choose right one for the right season. Its totally safe you can go for it.

What happens if I use 5W-20 instead of 5W-30?

Because of the thinner viscosity, 5W-20 performs well at lower operating temperature, whereas 5W-30 is thicker and works best in higher operating temperature. The 5w20 would easily flow in cold temperatures (during the winter), but it would thin up in hot temperatures.

Can you mix 5W20 and 5W20 synthetic oil?

On the other hand, 5W20 could either be fully synthetic or partially synthetic. Since that’s the case, you can just go ahead and mix both oils because they possess the same viscosity at operating temperatures.

Can I switch from 5W20 to 5W-30?

Remember, thinner motor oil (5W20) will flow through your engine better than 5W30. During winter weather, stick with 5W20 unless directed otherwise. If there isn’t an issue with you switching to 5W30, use it during the summer months.

Mixing Oil Weights [Can You Mix Oils of Different Viscosity and Weight?] • Road Sumo

When we talk about oil weight, we are referring to the viscosity of the oil. It relates to how well the oil flows at a certain temperature when the temperature is increased. The subject of whether it is possible to blend oil weights is frequently asked. For example, is it possible to combine 5w30 and 10w30 oil? Is it harmful to combine oil weights? In general, it is not advisable to blend different oil weights. A number of different viscosity classes, on the other hand, are compatible and can be mixed if they are all produced by the same motor oil manufacturer.

Initially, your engine may appear to be operating normally with the mixture.

Continue reading to find out more about how to combine motor oil weights and other issues relating to this.

Mixing Oil Weights

In general, combining different oil weights is not advised. In contrast, various viscosity classes are compatible with one another and can be mixed if they are all from the same motor oil brand. However, doing so will result in a new viscosity that is not the same as the original oil in the engine or the original oil to be used in the engine’s combustion chamber. The motor oils 5w30 and 10w30 are two of the most often used. A greater viscosity at low temperatures results in 10w30 oil being thicker and heavier than 5w30 oil, resulting in a thicker and heavier product.

Is it OK to use the heavier 10w30 oil with the lighter 5w30 oil?

If your oil level has to be replenished, you are already burning oil, thus the difference will not do any damage.

The only time the performance will alter is when it is really cold outside.

Can You Mix Two Different Types of Motor Oil Viscosity?

Drag racers frequently inquire about the possibility of combining two different types of motor oil viscosity in order to design their own oil viscosity. While you may have heard of some drivers engaging in this practice, it is not as straightforward as it appears. To accomplish this successfully, you must be an expert in your field. Many things must be learned since if you don’t perform something correctly, there are numerous possible difficulties that might develop. It is sufficient to say that, in general, the answer is no, and that we should completely exclude the possibility of combining different motor oil weights.

  1. In this section, you will learn about the additive formula and chemistry, viscosity of the mixture, oil mixture stability uncertainty, and more.

1. Additive Formula and Chemistry

The additive formula that is utilized to create each type of viscosity results in a different chemistry for each type of viscosity.

In order to determine how successful the combination will be, there is no way to test it. At the same time, unless you are ready to take a trial-and-error method, we have no way of knowing how it will influence lifetime.

2. Viscosity of the Mixture

When you combine different oil weights, the viscosity of the resulting engine oil will most likely be in the range of SAE 40. However, when it comes to its winterviscosity, which is typically abbreviated as ‘W,’ we can only speculate on where it will end up. You may change the chemistry of motor oil to get a different viscosity. However, combining two different oil weights will almost never result in the intended outcome.

3. Uncertainty of Oil Mixture Stability

It is impossible to predict how stable a combination of two oil weights will be until it is tested. It’s possible that your vehicle’s engine is operating smoothly right now because of the combination of two oil weights. However, you can never predict how it would respond under different circumstances. It may not be able to resist excessive heat and other environmental conditions, for all you know. Therefore, it is usually preferable to use a single brand of motor oil that is proven to provide the optimum performance.

Can You Mix Motor Oils of the Same Viscosity?

Is it possible to use a mixture of 10W-30 and 5W-30 motor oil in the engine of your vehicle? This pair is SAE 30 weighted, as is the other. So it is far superior to blending two different oil grades in this situation. This blend, on the other hand, could only be appropriate as a top-up. For a whole service period, this is most certainly not the best option.

Can You Mix Two Different Brands of Motor Oil?

What if you simply need to add a few drops of oil to your engine’s reservoir? Is it possible to blend two different brands of the same weight of oil? This is acceptable, to be sure. However, it is not recommended that you make this a regular practice. For example, suppose you are in the middle of a long journey. Then you discover that your Quaker State 5W-30 oil is depleted and has to be replenished. Unfortunately, the Valvoline 5W-30 oil is the only one that is offered at the carcare shop closest to you.

However, it is important to realize that the chemical concentrations of these oils vary somewhat.

As a result, even though both are 5W-30, their viscosities are just slightly different.

Can Synthetic and Conventional Oil Be Mixed Together?

Consider the scenario in which you only need to top off the oil in your engine. When mixing two different brands with the same oil weight, is it okay to combine them? This is okay, in my opinion. Nonetheless, it is not recommended that you make this a regular occurrence. If you are in the middle of a lengthy journey, for instance, Your Quaker State 5W-30 oil is running low, and you know you need to replace it. Unfortunately, the Valvoline 5W-30 oil is the only one that is available at your local auto care center.

However, keep in mind that the chemical concentrations of these oils vary slightly.

Essentially, it is this that distinguishes the brands one from the next. Even though both are 5W-30, the viscosity of the oils is only marginally different. Using a different brand of lubricant as a top-up may be okay, but it is not encouraged.

Is It Acceptable to Mix Gasoline Engine Oil and Diesel Engine Oil?

Indeed, heavy-duty diesel engine oil and gasoline engine oil have functions that are quite similar to one another. Their working environments, on the other hand, are very different. Dieselengineoils, in the vast majority of situations, meet or exceed the industry standards for gasoline-powered engines. However, in the case of gasoline engine oils, they are completely incompatible with diesel engines. Gasoline engine oils are completely unprepared to withstand the high pressures experienced by heavy-duty diesel engines.

If that’s the case, you can go ahead and do it.

However, if you want to combine them at your own discretion and without the assistance of a specialist, this is not a smart idea.

The opposite is true: filling a heavy-duty diesel engine with motor oil intended for gasoline engines is not a good idea under any circumstances.

Understanding Oil Weight

Having reviewed the drawbacks of combining oil weights, it is prudent to understand more about oil weights themselves. When we say ‘oilweight,’ we aren’t referring to how much the oil weighs in terms of weight. Rather, it is concerned with the viscosity or thickness of the motor oil in question. It has something to do with the longevity of the engine in your car. The kind of motor oil you use for your car is greatly influenced by the manufacturer’s recommendations for use. It is also dependent on the environment in which you reside and the amount of driving you perform.

Oil Weight and Flow

It is the viscosity or thickness of an oil that is referred to by the phrase ‘oil weight.’ A given temperature affects how easily it flows, and this is discussed in detail. The Society of Automotive Engineers assigns viscosity numbers, often known as weights, to various materials (SAE). 210° F flow rate is allocated to each oil based on its flow rate at that temperature. This temperature is more or less the typical working temperature for the vast majority of motors, if not the vast majority of all motors.

This also implies that the oil would be released gradually.

This property is also associated with how well it protects against friction and heating.

They do not provide the same amount of safety when faced with a stressful situation.

What W Means on Oil Bottles

You’ve probably noticed that the packaging of oils has two numbers on it that are separated by the letter ‘w,’ such as 5w30, and that these numbers are separated by the letter ‘w.’ Winter is represented by the letter ‘W.’ This indicates that the oil has a distinct viscosity that distinguishes it from the other oils on the market. Depending on the temperature, it has a variety of various flow properties. For example, a 5w30 indicates that the recipe contains five weights of oil. However, once the engine has been warmed up to 210°F, it begins to perform as a 30 weight oil.

That would be too thick, and the engine would have difficulty shooting swiftly in such settings, especially during colder weather conditions.

Running on a five-weight oil, on the other hand, is not an option.

This illustrates why you should use multigrade oil in your car. With another way of saying it, 5w30 indicates that the motor oil has level five viscosity at low temperatures and level thirty viscosity at high temperatures. As a result, your engine benefits from the best of both worlds.

What Oil Should You Use for Your Vehicle?

When in doubt about the oil to use for your car, see the Owner’s Manual. Each car is equipped with an Owner’s Manual. You’ll find the oil suggestion from the manufacturer in this section. Your car’s manufacturer will provide you with a list of oil types that are suitable for use in your vehicle. Several criteria are taken into consideration when making the suggestions. These factors include, among others, the weather conditions in your location, your driving style, and whether or not your vehicle will be transporting an additional weight.

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Always keep in mind that when it comes to motor oil products, there is no ‘one size fits all’ formula.

Make certain that you get the oil grade that will give the most protection for the engine of your car.

What Is the Equivalent of SAE 30 Oil?

When it comes to gauging viscosity, the SAE and ISO employ two separate scales. In terms of ISO standards, SAE 10W is equivalent to ISO 32, whereas SAE 20 is equivalent to ISO 46 and 68. When it comes to SAE 30, it is the same as ISO 100. On the other hand, if you inquire for SAE 30W, you will never come across an oil product that is marked as SAE 30W. You should never use a level 30 oil weight in your engine while the weather is below freezing. It will either not start, or it will do significant damage to your vehicle’s electrical system.

At low temperatures, this indicates that the oil is at level 5 or level 10, respectively, of toxicity.

Conclusion – Mixing Motor Oil Weights

In general, combining different oil weights is not advised. In contrast, various viscosity classes are compatible with one another and can be mixed if they are all from the same motor oil brand. However, doing so will result in a new viscosity that is not the same as the original oil in the engine or the original oil to be used in the engine’s combustion chamber. When you mix oil weights, your engine may first appear to be operating normally. However, in the long run, it is possible that this will not be the case.

This indicates that the conventional oil is really a byproduct of the process.

However, once you begin using synthetic oil, you should make the decision to continue using it indefinitely.

There will always be a certain oil that is best suited to your engine’s requirements. If you deviate from this, you can get a headache as a result. Related reading: Can I use 5w30 instead of 5w20 in some circumstances? 10w30 in comparison to 5w30

Mixing Motor Oils And All Things Related

Is it possible to combine two different types of motor oil viscosity to create your own unique viscosity? Is it permissible to combine two different viscosity types of motor oil? What do you think about combining various types of engine oil or combining traditional and synthetic engine oil together? It is possible to combine motor oils for gasoline and diesel engines. Let’s discuss about everything that has anything to do with mixing motor oil. First and foremost, a reader inquires: ‘I’m seeking for an engine oil for my drag race vehicle engine from your Dominator series,’ writes the reader.

  • How about combining the Dominator 10W-30 and 15W-50 to create (approximately) a 12W-40 in a blender?
  • To produce your own bespoke viscosity, you must mix two different weights of motor oil together.
  • Several unknowns, as well as certain possible issues, must be taken into consideration before moving further.
  • While the viscosity of the combination may result in an engine oil with a viscosity in the SAE 40 range, it is impossible to predict where the ‘W’ (winter viscosity) will end up.
  • One further area of uncertainty is the shear stability of a combination including two distinct weights of material.
  • While it is possible that this would not result in a catastrophe, the safer option would be to use a specific type of motor oil that has been specifically designed to work at its best.
  • If you are set on using SAE 40 oil, AMSOIL Synthetic Premium Protection 10W-40 Motor Oil is a good option to consider.
  • We are not encouraging the practice of brewing your own bespoke motor oil mixture for entire oil change intervals, and we are especially not endorsing it for racing purposes.

Can You Mix Motor Oils Of The Same or Similar Viscosity?

What do you think of putting a 5W-30 and a 10W-30 in your car’s engine at the same time? Because both classes are SAE 30 weight, this is preferable to combining two wholly distinct grades.

However, because the winter weights are different from the summer weights, it may not be a significant issue (but it also may not be optimal). In most cases, adding a 10W-30 to a 5W-30 should be sufficient for a top-up, but it is not recommended for a full service interval.

What About Mixing Different Brands Of Motor Oil?

Consider the following scenario: you are now using Quaker State 5W-30 in your engine and, for whatever reason, you need to add oil on a lengthy trip and the only oil available is Valvoline 5W-30. This is absolutely acceptable in situations when you need to top-up your oil level but only a different brand of oil is readily accessible. It is preferable not to combine two different brands of oil for the duration of an oil change interval, as the chemical composition of these oils may be somewhat different.

Can You Mix Synthetic and Conventional Oil?

It is possible that some conventional oil remains in your engine after switching to synthetic oil, and this is not a concern. In your engine, the combination of synthetic oil and conventional oil will not cause any form of chemical conflict to occur. However, when it comes to combining in bigger quantities, the same cautions that must be used when mixing brands must be followed. Because different additive chemistry might be involved, adding conventional motor oil to synthetic motor oil (and vice versa) is acceptable for a top-up application.

Can You Mix Diesel Engine Oil And Gasoline Engine Oil?

However, while gasoline engine oils and heavy-duty diesel engine oils perform functions that are comparable, the working environments of gasoline engines and diesel engines are vastly different. The vast majority of diesel engine oils meet or exceed the industry standards for gasoline engines, however the vast majority of gasoline engine oils are NOT acceptable for diesel engines. Their equipment is just not capable of dealing with the smoke and high pressures generated by heavy-duty diesel engines.

Consequently, you may fill the tank of a gasoline-powered automobile or truck with diesel engine oil, providing that the oil fulfills all applicable industry standards.

Conclusion

While it is true that you may mix several different types of motor oil in a hurry, this should not be done on a regular basis as part of your routine maintenance. It is quite difficult for motor oil manufacturers to get the optimal mix of chemical additives. Playing about with this balance is typically not beneficial unless you are in desperate need of a top-up of your oil.

Can you mix different oil weights?

Asked in the following category: General The most recent update was made on January 14, 2020. The good news is that mixing different types of oil will have no negative impact on your engine in the near term. The majority of synthetic and semi-synthetic engine lubricants are based on ordinary engine oil and are therefore interchangeable. When it comes to various grades, using them together won’t harm your engine in the slightest. Mixing various motoroil brands is typically discouraged; nevertheless, different viscosity grades of the same brand motoroil are compatible with one another.

  1. YES, it is possible to combine two different cooking oils in a single container, and oil mixing is both effective and helpful.
  2. Just to clarify, can you combine 5w30 and 10w30?
  3. It will not provide you with a blens.
  4. What happens if you use the wrong type of oil in your vehicle?

The brand of motoroil is unimportant; nevertheless, the viscosity grade (10W-30, for example) is critical to performance. The use of the incorrect oil might result in less lubrication and a shorter engine life. If the handbook specifies that synthetic oil should be used, then do so.

Can You Mix Synthetic Oil With Regular Oil?

In the event you have a query concerning motor oil — and this is a very essential question! — you’ve arrived at the correct website. After all, Jiffy Lube® is an expert in oil. Every day, thousands of motorists benefit from the expertise of Jiffy Lube professionals who assist them in selecting the proper motor oil, which includes determining whether to use synthetic or standard oil and determining if it is safe to combine motor oils. So, is it possible to use synthetic oil with ordinary oil? Yes.

Let’s assume you want to top off your oil in order to keep your car running until your next regularly scheduled maintenance check comes around.

BUT JUST BECAUSE YOU CAN DOESN’T MEAN YOU SHOULD

First, let’s take a deeper look at what motor oil is and what it is intended to achieve in order to better appreciate why mixing motor oil is not encouraged as a frequent practice. Oil travels through the motor, lubricating the moving parts and assisting in the reduction of friction and the prevention of overheating of the motor’s components. As a bonus, motor oil attracts deposits and contaminants, which are then removed by the filter, allowing your engine to run smoothly and cleanly. As implied by the question, ‘can synthetic oil be mixed with ordinary oil?’ it appears that there are only two types of oil.

The majority of Jiffy Lube® facilities utilize Pennzoil® motor oils, which are divided into four primary categories:

  • Motor oil that is conventional or regular in nature. Conventional motor oil, which is derived from crude oil, is frequently the best choice for vehicles with basic engine designs
  • Synthetic motor oil, on the other hand, is the greatest choice for vehicles with complex engine designs. Because synthetic motor oil is chemically manufactured, the molecules are more homogeneous in size and shape than conventional motor oils. Consequently, synthetic oil has less contaminants than regular oil, which is a positive development. Synthetic oils are often particularly made with additives to improve performance in high-temperature conditions
  • Synthetic blend motor oil is an example of this. It is a blend of synthetic and conventional oils, and it has a higher resistance to oxidation and rust than traditional oil. Consequently, it is a popular choice for driving in extremely cold or rainy conditions. Motor oil with a high mileage rating. High-mileage oil was developed for late-model or newer cars with more than 75,000 miles on the clock in order to decrease oil burn-off and leaks.

As you can see, each of these oils has been professionally designed to provide optimal results. It will not boost the performance or efficiency of your engine in any way if you combine the two. In addition, mixing will not increase the performance of the oil. This is demonstrated by the following two equally significant points:

  1. The addition of synthetic oil to ordinary motor oil will not improve the performance of the regular oil. When conventional motor oil is mixed with synthetic oil, the benefits of the more expensive synthetic oil may be diminished.

Mixing synthetic motor oils with normal or conventional oils is a waste of your hard-earned money when you consider that synthetic motor oils are often more costly than regular or traditional oils. It is possible that you will experience reduced engine protection if the benefits of synthetic oil are diluted.

REMEMBER, THE MIX IS JUST A SHORT-TERM FIX

To summarize, if you discover that you need to top up your motor oil and that the only easy and economical choice is to combine synthetic motor oil with ordinary motor oil, it is OK to use synthetic motor oil. However, it is not ideal and should not be repeated on a regular basis. After you’ve topped off your oil, why not call Jiffy Lube® and make an appointment for aJiffy Lube Signature Service® Oil Change so that your vehicle may receive the expert attention it needs? Now that you’ve learned the answer to the question ‘can you mix synthetic oil with conventional oil,’ you might be asking.

WHAT ABOUT MIXING ENGINE OIL BRANDS?

Yes.

The use of a mixture of oils, such as Quaker State® motor oil and Pennzoil, will not harm your engine, as long as the weight (or viscosity) of the oil used is the same as that advised in your vehicle’s owner’s handbook.

CAN YOU SWITCH BACK AND FORTH BETWEEN MOTOR OILS

Once upon a time, there was a popular belief that once you switched from regular to synthetic oil, you could never go back. That simply isn’t the case. However, before making the transfer, consult the owner’s handbook for your car. It will tell you what viscosity (or weight) of oil you should use and how much of it to use. Did you know that if you don’t follow the manufacturer’s recommendations, you run the risk of causing engine damage and possibly voiding your new-vehicle warranty? If you are unable to locate your manual, or if your manual provides you with a choice of options, you can always consult a Jiffy Lube® technician.

THE BEST TIME TO MAKE A SWITCH IS DURING AN OIL CHANGE

When you bring your car to a Jiffy Lube® facility in your neighborhood, you can expect to engage in a conversation regarding your oil change. You may be asked if you have any of the following:

  • When driving in stop-and-go traffic, driving in harsh temperatures, driving at higher engine speeds for an extended period of time, taking many short journeys averaging 5 to 10 miles in length Tow and/or transport large quantities of material
  • Drifting via sandy or muddy circumstances
  • Driving across steep terrain

The Jiffy Lube® expert will explain the motor oil selections for your specific vehicle based on your responses and manufacturer recommendations, among other factors. After you and your partner have discussed your options, you can make an informed decision based on factual knowledge rather than speculation. Then the properly educated technician will do the following:

  • Remove the used oil and dispose of it in an appropriate manner. Replace it with fresh oil that complies with the manufacturer’s specifications for kind, weight, and volume
  • And Remove the old, clogged oil filter and replace it with a new, clean one
  • Fill up on essential fluids, such as transmission, power steering, differential/transfer case, and washer fluid, as necessary. Vacuum the interior of the car and wash the windows on the outside of it.

You can ask the technician to place a sticker in the top left corner of your windshield to remind you when your next oil change is due if you’d like. For those who have an oil life monitor in their message center, the oil life meter will be reset to reflect the current oil change.

YES, JIFFY LUBE KNOWS OIL … AND A WHOLE LOT MORE

Jiffy Lube® technicians can help you with any automobile questions you might have. They have had extensive training in preventative maintenance and can assist you in keeping your vehicle, SUV, minivan, or truck out of the shop and back on the road, where it belongs, by doing routine maintenance.

READ MORE ABOUT IT

Here’s a list of the services that Jiffy Lube® offers, ranging from batteries and brakes to vehicle inspections and maintenance. There are several distinctions between synthetic and normal (also known as conventional) oil, which are discussed in this article. Please visit ourResource Centeron a frequent basis because new stuff is uploaded on a regular basis. Please keep in mind that not all services are available at every Jiffy Lube® service center. Please contact ahead or visit jiffylube.com to confirm if the service is available.

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What Happens if I Use the Wrong Weight (Viscosity) of Oil? – AMSOIL Blog

Use the viscosity suggested in your owner’s handbook whenever possible, although a slightly thicker or thinner oil is likely to work just as well. People frequently ask if it is safe to use a thicker or a thinner oil than what their engine manufacturer advises for their engine. For example, whether it is safe to use 10W-30 oil instead of 5W-30 oil is an often asked subject. However, while it’s always ideal to follow the recommendations in your owner’s handbook, mistakenly using a viscosity one grade higher or lower than what’s specified in the manual is unlikely to cause long-term damage.

  • Brad gets a new automobile that requires 0W-20 motor oil to be used in the engine.
  • ‘ He drains the 0W-20 that came with his new bike and replaces it with 15W-50 racing oil, in order to provide the greatest possible protection for his new vehicle.
  • He is a fan of conserving money, so he decides to purchase a 1998 Toyota Corolla.
  • He does, however, have some 10W-30 in his garage, which he uses to replace the oil.

Oil container on a scale to demonstrate ‘weight’ or viscosity of the liquid within.’ data-image-caption=” data-medium-file=’ data-large-file=’ loading=’lazy’ data-large-file=’ data-medium-file=’ data-large-file=’ width: 300px; height: 198px; src=’ The use of thicker or thinner oil than what is advised can create engine difficulties.

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Engines are built to use a certain viscosity of motor oil

The modern engines of today are designed with far tighter tolerances than the engines of their forefathers. For starters, the clearances between the crankshaft journals and the main bearings have been reduced. In order to allow current engines to run on lower viscosity motor oils, such as 0W-20 and even 0W-16, this is done on purpose. Due to the fact that they flow more freely than higher-viscosity oils, lower-viscosity oils minimize internal friction, resulting in improved fuel efficiency. Automakers are turning to low-viscosity lubricants to help them satisfy stricter fuel-economy rules, which is helping them meet the criteria.

Thicker oil may not flow quickly enough

According to Brad, his 15W-50 racing oil may be too thick to flow rapidly enough to cover the gaps that exist in his engine’s crank journals and main bearings while the engine is running. Because the oil does not produce a uniform lubricating coating, metal-to-metal contact and wear are permitted. His engine was built expressly for use with a lower viscosity oil, in this instance 0W-20. He was the first person to do so. Because of its reduced viscosity, it can flow more quickly and completely cover the microscopic gaps between components, resulting in a long-lasting, uniform lubricating coating.

Given that thicker oil does not transfer heat as efficiently as thinner oil, operating temperatures will rise, potentially resulting in an acceleration of chemical breakdown and the formation of hazardous sludge and deposits.

Some oil viscosity differences are less pronounced

In John’s situation, utilizing 10W-30 instead of 5W-30 results in fewer possible problems. This is because his engine is older and was not manufactured to the same precise tolerances as Brad’s engine. Furthermore, after the engine has attained working temperature, the viscosity of both oils is the same. He knows this because the second number in the viscosity rating of each oil (i.e., ’30’) is the same for both oils. When heated to 212°F (100°C), which is the average working temperature, it defines how well an oil flows.

Think of the letter ‘W’ as standing for ‘winter’ to make things easier to understand.

Consequently, 5W-30 will flow more freely at commencement than 10W-30 in this situation.

Thin may not be in

If John went completely off the rails and put 0W-16 in his 1998 Corolla instead of the prescribed viscosity, what would be the result? Using an oil with a viscosity that is too high can cause issues with Brad’s engine, and using an oil with a viscosity that is too low can have the same effect. Oil that is too thin may not be able to form a continuous lubricating coating, allowing metal-to-metal contact to occur, which results in wear. Extreme stress and heat add to the difficulty of the situation.

Oil that is too thin can also result in insufficient oil pressure, which can make it difficult to effectively run your vehicle’s variable valve timing system, if it is equipped with this feature.

Additionally, low pressure may result in lifters failing to maintain contact with the cams, resulting in noise and increased wear.

Bottom line on using thicker oil or thinner oil

A viscosity that is one grade higher or lower than what is suggested for your engine is unlikely to cause long-term damage to it. While using the viscosity advised in your owner’s handbook will remove any worries regarding engine protection and your car warranty, it is important to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations as well. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact AMSOIL Technical Services () for assistance in determining the right viscosity for your application. Updated.

Engine oil: Can I mix two different brands with the same viscosity?

A motor is being lubricated using engine oil. Can you put two different brands of motor oil in your automobile if they both have the same viscosity (e.g., 0W-40) and they both perform the same function? Occasionally, we are approached by colleagues who are interested in finding out more about us.

THE ANSWER IS NO!

If two different brands of oil have the same viscosity, it is still not recommended that they be mixed together. The fact that somebody would ever consider doing anything like this in the first place is something we cannot understand. But we’re getting ahead of ourselves.) Technically speaking, choosing an oil grade suggested by your vehicle’s manufacturer is the proper choice. If you blend two different kinds of motor oil, on the other hand, you run the danger of causing harm. The engine is rattling: What caused it to occur after I had my oil changed?

SO WHY CAN’T YOU COMBINE OILS?

The reason for this is that each type of engine oil is prepared differently, particularly in terms of the additives that are utilized by the oil maker. Nobody, maybe with the exception of the most senior scientists and engineers employed by these oil companies, is familiar with the chemistry of their engine oils. As a result, we as customers cannot be certain that one oil will not have an effect on another. We don’t know anything about their chemistry. Is it possible to lengthen the time between oil changes on my car?

Don’t make a fool of yourself with your cherished asset!

As a result, the engine’s protection is diminished.

WHAT IF YOU’RE SWITCHING BRANDS AT YOUR NEXT OIL CHANGE?

Even after the oil has been emptied, a thin coating still remains on the critical components of your motor. It’s fine to finish filling the tank with a different brand of engine oil after that. Consequently, the fresh filling would account for the vast bulk of the oil in your engine. When it comes to engine oil, what’s the difference between mineral and synthetic?

WHAT ABOUT MIXING MINERAL AND SYNTHETIC OILS?

The oil is drained from your motor but still retains a thin layer that protects all of the critical components. Continue to fill the tank with a different brand of engine oil until the tank is completely full. Consequently, the bulk of the oil in your engine would now come from the fresh filling. When it comes to engine oil, what is the distinction between mineral and synthetic?

Oil Viscosity

The term ‘viscosity’ is one that most of us are only vaguely familiar with. Most of the time, we opt for an oil with a viscosity that we believe is appropriate for our particular engine; however, would using a different viscosity increase or decrease the engine’s life? Is it possible to pick and choose a viscosity that is different from the manufacturer’s recommendations? Viscosity is defined as the resistance to flow in technical terms. Generally speaking, however, we refer to it as the thickness of an oil.

  • The plot thickens (ha!) as the story progresses.
  • At Blackstone, we measure the high-temperature viscosity, which is generally the temperature at which the engine is operating and the temperature at which the oil spends the majority of its time when the engine is running.
  • It doesn’t matter what language you use to describe an apple; an apple is an apple.
  • (You can get your own viscosity chart by clicking here.) Whatever you want to call it, the number specified defines the thickness of the oil when heated to the standard high temperature (or higher).
  • A significant difference between the two is the addition of a VI additive, which allows the oil to maintain more or less the same flow rate regardless of the operating environment in which it is used.
  • It is difficult to get honey to flow when it is cold; however, if you heat the honey in the microwave, it will flow much more easily.
  • This is due to the fact that water has a very narrow viscosity range, whereas honey has a much wider range.

In order to behave more like water, we want the oil to behave as if it has a narrow viscosity range, maintaining a fairly consistent flow rate regardless of whether the oil is cold or warm.

When used in conjunction with multi-grade oil, the VI additives make it easier to move through a cold engine on start-up while still providing cushion and lubrication when the engine is hot.

People frequently inquire as to whether it is acceptable to use a different viscosity oil than that recommended by the manufacturer.

Due to the fact that engine manufacturers dyno-test their engines with a specific viscosity oil, when you use the viscosity recommended by the manufacturer, you are working with a known outcome.

You want to use the lightest grade of oil possible in your engine for the sake of efficiency, but only within certain limits.

The use of lighter oil in new engines has become increasingly popular over the last few years.

The oil in many light cars is 5W/20 or 0W/20 since many manufacturers use it in the factory (including trucks) and suggest it for everyday usage in many other light vehicles.

Viscosity changes are seen.

It is possible to alter the viscosity of your oil by introducing foreign substances into it.

Contamination is another another factor that might affect viscosity levels.

Excessive soot and antifreeze may significantly increase the viscosity of an oil.

Some engines will shear the viscosity of the oil down regardless of the oil used.

The goal is to figure out why this is happening and then fix or modify your driving habits accordingly, as well as to correct the viscosity and maximize the efficiency of your engine. While deciding what to use, you should test your oil. The metals you wear don’t tell a lie!

Synthetic Oil vs. Synthetic Blend vs. Conventional Oil

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) created a grading system for motor oils that is used to grade oil based on its viscosity. The resistance to flow of a fluid is measured in viscosity. A low viscosity is associated with thin fluids (such as water), whereas a high viscosity is associated with thick fluids (such as honey). The viscosity of motor oil fluctuates as a result of the temperature fluctuations it undergoes. SAE viscosity grades are a classification of viscosity. When it comes to performance, multi-grade viscosity motor oils can handle a broad variety of temperature variations.

While multigrade viscosity motor oil flows efficiently at low temperatures, it nevertheless provides enough protection for the engine when operating at high temperatures.

Always refer to your vehicle’s owner’s handbook for information on the proper motor oil specification, viscosity grade, and oil drain interval for your engine’s unique needs.

What Kind Of Oil Should I Use For My Air Compressor?

Going through the process of looking for air compressor oil is time-consuming, and it makes me ponder what sort of oil I should be using. Are You Able to Relate? There are compressor-specific lubricants available, but picking between conventional and synthetic mixes, different weights, and different brands may be a difficult decision. After a significant amount of study (many hours) on different compressor oils, everything became evident, and I took notes on areas that I believed would be of interest to others, which I have included in this post as a resource.

What Kind Of Oil Should I Use In My Air Compressor?

A 20 weight or 30 weight (non-detergent) compressor oil is typically recommended by compressor manufacturers. Using a standard or synthetic mix compressor oil is permissible if the manufacturer specifies that it is possible to do so; nonetheless, you must follow the manufacturer’s guidelines to prevent voiding the warranty.

Oil Lubricated Compressors vs Oil-Less Models:

Oil-lubricated air compressors have a longer engine life than their oil-less counterparts, which is what this page is primarily concerned with. You won’t need to change the oil in your air compressor as frequently as you would in a car, but you should do it at the very least once a year at the very least. It is not necessary to add any form of oil to the engine itself while using an oil-less air compressor since the engine is coated and sealed before it leaves the manufacturer, most likely using a Teflon type coating that will never require the addition of any type of oil to the engine itself.

It is common for oil-less compressors to have a shorter lifespan than their oil-lubricated counterparts, as well as to be a little noisier in operation.

Compressor Oil vs. Motor Oil.

Because compressor oils are particularly created for compressors (of course), they are essentially a non-detergent sort of oil in its most basic form. Typically, a motor oil (for your vehicle or truck) will have some form of detergent, which is useful to an internal combustion engine, but it will not be the greatest choice for a compressor since it will actually produce a significant increase in carbon buildup in a relatively short period of time. Oils for compressors are generally considered to be the better choice, especially if you want to adhere to the compressor manufacturer’s warranty guidelines.

It’s possible to use a non-detergent (20 or 30w) motor oil for your compressor if you’re in a pinch, but I’m guessing that most people won’t have a non-detergent motor oil on hand for their vehicles, so the ‘convenience factor’ of only having to buy one type of oil is gone because you’d have to purchase specialty oil anyhow.

Synthetic vs, Standard Air Compressor Oil:

Because compressor oils are particularly created for compressors (of course), they are essentially a non-detergent form of oil in their most basic definition. Motor oil (for your vehicle or truck) will typically have some form of detergent, which is useful to an internal combustion engine, but it will not be the greatest choice for a compressor since it will actually produce a significant increase in carbon buildup over a very short period of time. Oils for compressors are generally considered to be the better choice, especially if you want to comply with the compressor manufacturer’s warranty guidelines.

See also:  Jeep starts and stalls? (Professionals recommend)

It’s possible to use a non-detergent (20 or 30w) motor oil for your compressor if you’re in a pinch, but I’m guessing that most people won’t have a non-detergent motor oil on hand for their vehicles, so the ‘convenience factor’ of only having to purchase one type of oil is gone because you’d have to buy specialty oil anyhow.

What Viscosity Should I Use?

Many compressor manufacturers would prescribe a 20- or 30-weight compressor oil, depending on their product line. In the same way that motor oil works, if you live in a climate with colder winters, you may have to go from a 30 weight oil to a 20 weight oil for half of the year in order to keep your vehicle running properly. Due to the fact that it is viscous (thicker) and coats the components much better than a lighter weight oil, a 30 weight oil will give additional protection throughout the summer months.

In these sorts of ‘cold start’ conditions, a 20 weight oil would be preferable, and it would actually assist the compressor in starting up.

Where Can I Find Compressor Oil?

I was checking around internet to see how many companies provided compressor oil and whether it was difficult to come by. I came across this website. The fact that there were numerous different sites that carried compressor oil, including several auto-parts stores, was a pleasant surprise. However, it was impossible to tell if they were in stock or not at my local store. For those of us who order things through Amazon, there was a surprising selection of synthetic compressor oil and standard compressor oil (here’s a link to Amazon’s selection), which is always convenient because they appear to be priced competitively and, if you’re an Amazon prime member, you can have it delivered right to your door in a couple of days, which is always convenient.

Lowe’s didn’t have much either, and after doing a short internet search, I discovered that Lowe’s really had an even less variety than Home Depot did, so I’d call ahead of time to make sure they have what you’re looking for before making the trip down to the local hardware store.

If you decide to stop by your local auto parts store, you can see if they have any in stock, but I wouldn’t expect to discover anything really noteworthy.

FAQ’s I Found Regarding Compressor Oil:

It occurred to me that there were a few queries (on the internet) about air compressor oil that didn’t really require a lengthy explanation but were still legitimate, so I decided to answer them in order to make this page more of a ‘full resource.’

  • When Should I Use Motor Oil in My Compressor?– In most cases, the answer will be no
  • However, if you are stuck or determined to use motor oil in your compressor, non-detergent oil is the best option. How Frequently Should I Change My Air Compressor Oil?- For a reciprocating compressor, oil should be changed every three months, and for a rotary compressor, oil should be changed once every seven thousand hours. At the bare minimum, once a year is great. Always consult the owner’s handbook before doing anything else. In order for an air compressor to work properly, it must be lubricated. – This is only true if you have an air compressor that is lubricated with oil. An oil-less compressor does not require oil because it is pre-coated and sealed right out of the factory
  • Instead, it uses compressed air.

How to Navigate the Confusing Task of Picking the Right Motor Oil

Because there are so many different types of motor oil available, selecting the proper one for your automobile may appear to be a difficult chore at first. While there is a plethora of information available regarding the various oil options, the initial step is actually pretty straightforward: Consult the owner’s handbook for your vehicle. The recommended oil weight for your automobile will be listed in the owner’s handbook, whether it’s a typical format like 10W-30 or something a little more unique.

  1. You should alter the weight and type of automobile you buy depending on the season and how you want to use it, as we’ll describe more below.
  2. Whenever possible, use an oil from a brand that has the starburst symbol on the bottle, which signifies that the oil has been tested by the American Petroleum Institute (API).
  3. API’s most recent service standards are SP for gasoline engines and CK-4 for diesel engines, according to the organization.
  4. If you’re interested in learning more about these standards, the API has a comprehensive list available here.
  5. For gasoline engines, these are the designations SP, SN, SM, SL, and SJ, while for diesel engines, these are CK-4, CJ-4, CI-4, CH-4, and FA-4, as of the time of this writing.
  6. Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Full Synthetic Motor Oil 5W-30 (Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Full Synthetic Motor Oil 5W-30) Pennzoilamazon.com $8.92 Valvoline High Mileage with MaxLife, 10W-30 Synthetic Oil is a high mileage oil with a long life.
  7. $215.00

Understand the Labels

On every container of respectable motor oil, you’ll see labels like the ones shown below. The API doughnut on the right indicates whether or not the oil matches the requirements of the present service grade. This information also includes the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) viscosity number, as well as whether or not the oil has passed the Resource Conserving test. In the doughnut on the left, a starburst sign denotes that the oil has passed the service tests that are specified in the other doughnut.

Viscosity

The resistance to flow of a fluid is referred to as its viscosity. The viscosity of most motor oils is determined by how thick it is at zero degrees Fahrenheit (as indicated by the number preceding the W, which stands for winter) as well as its thickness at 212 degrees Fahrenheit (as represented by the number preceding the W, which stands for summer) (represented by the second number after the dash in the viscosity designation). When heated, motor oil becomes thinner and runnier, and when cooled, it becomes thicker and more viscous.

  1. It is possible to grade an oil for one viscosity while cold and a different viscosity when hot if the oil contains the appropriate additives to assist it resist thinning excessively in the heat.
  2. Oil must also be resistant to excessive thickening at low temperatures in order to ensure that it can still adequately cool and lubricate all the moving components in your engine.
  3. It takes more energy for the engine to move the crankshaft, which is partially submerged in an oil bath, if the oil is too thick to begin with.
  4. Synthetic oils, on the other hand, may be engineered to flow even more smoothly when cold, allowing them to pass testing that are required to reach the 0W rating.

Why So Many Oils?

Jeff Greenberg is a writer and editor who lives in New York City. Photographs courtesy of Getty Images Consider visiting an auto parts store and you’ll see oils labeled for all kinds of specific purposes, including high-tech engines, new automobiles, higher-mileage vehicles, off-road vehicles, and even vehicles from specific countries. High-tech engines, new automobiles, higher-mileage automobiles, heavy-duty off-road vehicles, and even automobiles from certain countries are all covered by the oil labels.

Reading your owner’s handbook will inform you of the type of oil the car’s manufacturer suggested for usage when the vehicle was brand new.

Most top brands have at least certain viscosities that are designated as such, even though this does not necessarily translate into higher fuel efficiency.

How to Choose Between Synthetic and Conventional Motor Oil

Jeff Greenberg is a writer and entrepreneur who lives in New York City. The Getty Images collection contains a variety of images that are available for licensing. Consider visiting an auto parts store and you’ll find oils labeled for all kinds of specific purposes, including high-tech engines, new automobiles, higher-mileage vehicles, off-road vehicles, and even vehicles from specific countries. High-tech engines, new automobiles, higher-mileage automobiles, heavy-duty off-road vehicles, and even automobiles from certain countries are all covered by the oil labels.

Reading your owner’s handbook will inform you of the type of oil the car’s manufacturer suggested for usage when the vehicle was brand new, and you may use that oil.

Most top brands have at least certain viscosities that are designated as such, even if this doesn’t necessarily translate into higher fuel efficiency.

Going Deeper

Photographs courtesy of BanksPhotosGetty Images The viscosity index of an oil measures how resistant it is to weakening when exposed to higher temperatures. Although a higher second number is preferable, the oil must also be durable, allowing it to endure for thousands of kilometers before it has to be changed. The shear motion that occurs between metal surfaces, such as that found in bearings, causes oil to lose its viscosity. Shear motion is defined as the sliding motion that occurs between metal surfaces.

  • Unlike antifreeze, which is composed mostly of a single basis chemical (usually ethylene glycol), petroleum-based engine oil is composed of a blend of many distinct types of base oils, some of which are more expensive than others, resulting in a more expensive final product.
  • The more costly groups are subjected to more intensive processing, in certain circumstances employing techniques that result in a lubricant that can be considered synthetic.
  • According to one case study, a bespoke blend had 10 percent polyalphaolefins (PAO), which are the most prevalent type of chemical employed as the major ingredient in a complete synthetic oil mix.
  • When it comes to base oils, an oil containing just 70% base oils is not always superior than an oil containing 95% base oils.
  • Despite the fact that some additives promote lubrication, they do not necessarily have high lubricity on their own.
  • Some additives perform better in some base oil combinations than in others.
  • The bottom line is that every motor oil has a certain formula.
  • Another key aspect of engine operation is to maintain the oil from thinning when it gets heated and subjected to the rigors of engine running.

One method is to use less volatile premium base oils to keep the product from evaporating. It is not only that evaporation of the basic oil package increases oil consumption, but it also results in thicker oil, which reduces fuel efficiency as well.

Oil Additives

A second technique to increasing and sustaining oil performance is through the use of additives by oil firms. Extremely high engine temperatures interact with moisture, combustion byproducts (such as unburned gasoline), rust and corrosion, engine-wear particles, and oxygen to form sludge and varnish, which can clog the engine and cause it to malfunction. Additives aid in the preservation of proper lubrication by reducing the accumulation of sludge and varnish. The following are the primary types of additive ingredients, as well as the reasons why they are important: Improvers of the viscosity index include: These help to limit the propensity of the oil to thin out as the temperature rises.

  1. They do remove certain deposits, mainly solids, but not all of them.
  2. Dispersants are substances that disperse solid particles by keeping them suspended in a solution, preventing them from combining to produce sludge, varnish, or acids.
  3. When the lubricating film formed by oil breaks down, antiwear chemicals must be used to protect the metal surfaces from further wear and tear.
  4. If you don’t already know, ZDDP is an abbreviation for zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate.
  5. They help to minimize engine friction, which in turn helps to increase fuel efficiency.
  6. Pour-point depressants are substances that lower the boiling point of water.
  7. Because oil includes wax particles that might congeal and decrease flow, these additives are employed to maintain the oil flowing even when it is extremely cold.
  8. Some additives that are used for other purposes, like as antiwear agents, are also used for this reason.
  9. Foam inhibitors prevent this from happening.
  10. The use of rust or corrosion inhibitors helps to keep metal parts from being corroded by acids and moisture.

Read further: Oil additives? (The answer is found)

More Is Not Better

Another method of increasing and sustaining oil performance is through the use of additives by oil firms. Extremely high engine temperatures interact with moisture, combustion byproducts (such as unburned gasoline), rust and corrosion, engine-wear particles, and oxygen to form sludge and varnish, which can clog the engine and cause it to fail. By reducing sludge and varnish, additives aid in the preservation of excellent lubrication. In order of importance, the following are the major types of added ingredients: The following are agents that raise the viscosity index: These help to decrease the oil’s tendency to thin out when the temperature rises in the air conditioning.

  • However, certain deposits are removed, especially solids.
  • In order to prevent the formation of sludge, varnish, or acids, dispersants are used to disperse solid particles by maintaining them in solution.
  • When the lubricating film formed by oil breaks down, antiwear chemicals must be used to protect the metal surfaces from further wear and tear.
  • ZDDP is an abbreviation for zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate, in case you were wondering.
  • Consequently, they can help you save money on gas by lowering engine friction.
  • Because oil includes wax particles that might congeal and decrease flow, these additives are employed to keep the oil flowing even when it is extremely cold outside.
  • Some additives, like as antiwear compounds, that are used for other purposes are also used for this reason.

Due to the fact that oil foam is not as efficient as a liquid stream as a lubricant, oils include foam inhibitors, which force the foam bubbles to collapse when exposed to heat. Acid and moisture are protected from metal parts by rust or corrosion inhibitors.

Don’t Forget the Filter

The use of additives by oil firms is another method of increasing and sustaining oil performance. High engine temperatures interact with moisture, combustion byproducts (such as unburned gasoline), rust, corrosion, engine-wear particles, and oxygen to form sludge and varnish, which can clog and harm the engine. Additives aid in the preservation of proper lubrication by reducing the buildup of sludge and varnish. The following are the major types of additive ingredients, as well as the reasons why they are important: Improvers of the viscosity index include the following: These help to limit the oil’s tendency to thin as the temperature rises.

They are effective in removing certain deposits, mainly solids.

Dispersants are substances that disperse solid particles by keeping them suspended in a solution, preventing them from forming sludge, varnish, or acids.

When the lubricating layer generated by oil breaks down, antiwear chemicals must be used to preserve the metal surfaces.

If you don’t already know, ZDDP is an acronym that stands for zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate.

They can help to minimize engine friction, which can help to increase fuel efficiency.

Pour-point depressants include the following: Just because a viscosity rating of 0 degrees Fahrenheit is low does not imply that oil will flow smoothly at low temperatures.

Antioxidants: As a result of tougher emissions rules and increased engine temperatures, antioxidants are required to prevent oxidation, which causes the oil to thicken.

Oil foams as a result of the crankshaft thrashing through the oil in the oil pan.

Due to the fact that oil foam is not as efficient as a liquid stream as a lubricant, many oils include foam inhibitors that force the foam bubbles to collapse.

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