P0134 Honda Civic? (Solution)

  • P0134 is a relatively common OBDII trouble code. It’s generic, which means that it has the same meaning for any vehicle with OBDII. It means that the PCM/ECM is not detecting any activity from the sensor. The Civic’s computer uses the oxygen sensor to measure the amount of O2 gases in the exhaust. It uses this data to tune the engine on the fly.

Can I drive my car if the oxygen sensor is bad?

Yes, you can drive with a bad oxygen sensor if you can still start your engine and feel little difficulty driving. But don’t leave it alone for over a couple of days, as it might cause safety problems and lead to the malfunction of other parts of your vehicle.

How many O2 sensors does a Honda Civic have?

Oxygen sensors are located before and after the catalytic converter. A vehicle may have two to five oxygen sensors, and sometimes even more.

Where are the sensors located on a 2020 Honda Civic?

A driver support system which employs the use of two distinctly different kinds of sensors, a radar sensor located in the front grille and a front sensor camera mounted to the interior side of the windshield, behind the rearview mirror.

What causes P0134 code?

Code P0134 is triggered when your vehicle’s O2 sensor (bank 1, sensor 1) is malfunctioning. The Engine Control Module (ECM) detects that the Oxygen (O2) sensor is at a standstill and is not accurately reading the amount of oxygen in the exhaust.

What causes a P0172 code?

Here are the different possible reasons why you’re getting the engine code P0172: Contaminated engine oil (too long since the last oil change) A leaking fuel injector. Excessive fuel pressure due to restriction along the fuel return line or a faulty fuel pressure regulator.

What are signs of a bad oxygen sensor?

Here are some of the most common signs that your oxygen sensor is bad.

  • A Glowing Check Engine Light. The bright orange Check Engine light in your dashboard will usually glow if you have a bad oxygen sensor.
  • Bad Gas Mileage.
  • An Engine That Sounds Rough.
  • An Emissions Test Failure.
  • An Older Vehicle.

How much does it cost to replace an oxygen sensor?

A brand new replacement oxygen sensor can cost you from $20 to $100, depending on the make and year of your car. Taking your car to a mechanic to fix the issue can cost up to $200.

Is it hard to replace an oxygen sensor?

In most vehicles, replacing an oxygen sensor is a simple procedure that requires only a few tools. However, if this is not a task you are comfortable doing on your own, this is something that any professional technician, such as one from YourMechanic, can take care of quickly and easily.

Should I replace all O2 sensors at once?

Manufacturers recommend replacing O2 sensors in pairs (both Upstream or both Downstream). An older, slower sensor can cause an imbalance in the engine management system, leading to poor fuel economy and possible damage to the catalytic converter.

Where is the O2 sensor on Honda Civic?

Identification. If you open the hood of your Honda Civic, most likely you will locate the oxygen sensor (O2) mounted in the exhaust manifold, above the exhaust pipe flange. On some models the exact location might vary, but you can always find the sensor by following the exhaust manifold and pipe.

How much is an oxygen sensor for a Honda?

Honda Accord Oxygen Sensor Replacement Cost Estimate. Labor costs are estimated between $40 and $50 while parts are priced between $316 and $401.

How much does it cost to recalibrate Honda Sensing?

Generally an aftermarket OEM windshield will run you somewhere between $250.00 and $500.00 depending on the features, and the calibration can cost as much as $1200.00 if completed by the dealer.

Can you permanently disable Honda Sensing?

Yes, you can turn Honda Sensing® features off if you want. To turn off RDM, press the button under ECON. LKAS can be disabled by pushing the MAIN button on the steering wheel. You can also personalize your Honda Sensing® settings through the optional central touchscreen.

Does Honda warranty cover brakes?

Replacement Parts Limited Warranty It only covers parts considered to be normal maintenance items, like spark plugs, filters, and brake pads, if they are defective.

Honda Accord 1998-2002: problems, timing belt or chain, fuel economy, engine

Known as the air fuel ratio sensor or front oxygen sensor (Bank 1 Sensor 1), this sensor detects the quantity of oxygen in the exhaust stream. The engine computer changes the fuel/air ratio based on the signal it receives to ensure that it remains at its optimal level. More information about the air fuel ratio sensor may be found here. When the relevant criteria (engine temperature, rpm, and so on) are satisfied, the code P0134 indicates that the signal from the air fuel ratio sensor does not change for a certain period of time and the code is shown.

According to Honda, changing the A/F sensor and installing a sub-harness kit are the best solutions for this issue.

A TSB for the Nissan Maxima from 2000 to 2001 notes the possibility of an intermittent connection at the ECM, which might result in the code P0134 or other errors.

A new air/fuel ratio sensor is generally sufficient to resolve the issue.

  • What should be double-checked: If there are any other issue codes saved with the P0134, it is possible that they will need to be investigated first.
  • First and foremost, the air/fuel ratio sensor connector, as well as the sensor power and ground, must be thoroughly examined and repaired.
  • If no other issues are discovered, the sensor will need to be replaced.
  • The voltage or current of the signal should remain within the prescribed range.
  • It is expected that the indicator would vary when the engine is revved.
  • It seems reasonable to do this in order to prevent the potential of the sensor experiencing occasional issues.
  • Replacement of the air-to-fuel ratio sensor Changing out the air-to-fuel ratio sensor When replacing the front oxygen or air fuel ratio sensor, it is usually suggested to utilize an original equipment manufacturer replacement.
  • If the vehicle is California-certified, it may be required to have a particular air fuel ratio sensor installed in it.

It is possible that replacing the air fuel ratio sensor ratio sensor will cost between $50 and $150 in labor and between $65 and $320 in parts. If you want to change the sensor yourself, you may require a specific oxygen sensor socket, such as the one shown in the photo.

Honda Civic P0134: O2 Sensor → No Activity Detected B1S1

Known as the air fuel ratio sensor or front oxygen sensor (Bank 1 Sensor 1), this sensor detects the quantity of oxygen in the exhaust gas stream. The engine computer changes the fuel/air ratio based on the signal it receives to ensure that it remains at its optimal level. You may learn more about the air fuel ratio sensor by reading the following article: After meeting the required criteria (engine temperature, revs per minute, etc.), the code P0134 indicates that the signal from the air fuel ratio sensor has remained constant.

  1. Air/fuel ratio sensor that is not functioning properly (front oxygen sensor) – a short or an open in the oxygen sensor wire or connection.
  2. According to Honda, repairing the A/F sensor and installing a sub-harness kit are the best solutions for this situation.
  3. A TSB for the Nissan Maxima from 2000 to 2001 notes the possibility of an intermittent connection at the ECM, which might result in the code P0134 or other errors being displayed.
  4. In most cases, replacing the air/fuel ratio sensor will resolve the issue.
  5. Things that need to be looked at are as follows.
  6. P0154 Oxygen (A/F) Sensor No Activity Detected (Bank 2 Sensor 1) stored in conjunction with the P0134 in a V6 or V8 engine indicates that the fault is most likely not with the oxygen sensors, since neither sensor would fail at the same time in a V6 or V8 engine.
  7. Following that, the wiring between the PCM and the air fuel sensor must be checked.
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With a scan tool, you may examine the air fuel ratio sensor in the following way: After the engine has been properly warmed up, the air fuel ratio sensor values are verified.

On a scan tool, the current value of the Hondaair fuel ratio sensor may be shown.

Your mechanic may recommend that you replace the air fuel ratio sensor first while troubleshooting the code p0134, even if the sensor appears to be operational at the time.

Furthermore, the air fuel ratio sensor in many autos degrades with time regardless of use.

Air fuel ratio sensor replacement is required.

When an aftermarket air fuel ratio sensor is incompatible with the vehicle, the code P0134 may be shown.

Using the VIN number of your car, your dealer can confirm that the part number is correct.

It is possible that replacing the air fuel ratio sensor ratio sensor will cost between $50 and $150 in labor, plus between $65 and $320 in parts and accessories. To change the sensor as part of a DIY project, you may require a specific oxygen sensor socket, such as the one seen in the photograph.

P0134 Definition

P0134: No activity detected by the oxygen sensor. Bank 1 Sensor 1 is located on the first bank of sensors. The oxygen sensor in the Civic’s computer is used to determine the quantity of O2 gases present in the exhaust. It makes use of this information to fine-tune the engine on the fly. When this oxygen sensor does not provide a signal, the engine will not be able to operate at peak efficiency, resulting in the appearance of the dreaded check engine light on the dashboard. P0134 has an impact on Bank 1 Sensor 1.

  • As a result, Bank 1 can be located on either side of the engine depending on the model year and engine.
  • Because there is just one exhaust manifold on an inline engine (which is practically all four-cylinder engines), you don’t have to bother about which side of the engine it is on.
  • The O2 sensor receives a voltage from the PCM, which is around 450mv.
  • If it fails to do so (or does it too slowly), the P0134 error code will be generated.

P0134 Symptoms Honda Civic

The O2 sensor has detected no activity, which results in the error code P0134. Bank 1 Sensor 1 is located in the first bank of sensors. The amount of oxygen gases in the exhaust is measured by the Civic’s computer, which employs the oxygen sensor. In order to optimize the engine on the fly, it makes use of this data collection system. This oxygen sensor is responsible for ensuring that the engine runs at peak efficiency. If the sensor does not provide a signal, you will see the check engine light on.

  • When the engine is running, Bank 1 is the side of the engine that is firing first, as indicated by the number on the piston.
  • Investigate the engine bank 1 side to determine where it is located.
  • In the sensor line-up, Sensor 1 will be the initial sensor.
  • In theory, this voltage should alter as the engine heats up.
  • When it comes to learning how to test P0134, this video is invaluable.
  • P0134: No activity detected by the O2 sensor. Bank 1 Sensor 1 is the first sensor in the bank. The oxygen sensor in the Civic’s computer is used to determine the quantity of oxygen gases present in the exhaust. It makes use of this information to optimize the engine on the fly. When this oxygen sensor does not provide a signal, the engine will not be able to operate at peak efficiency, resulting in the appearance of the dreaded check engine light. Bank 1 Sensor 1 is affected by the P0134. Bank 1 is the side of the engine that has the first piston in the firing sequence, and it is located on the left side of the engine. This implies that Bank 1 can be located on either side of the engine depending on the model year and engine. Find out which side of the engine bank 1 is on by looking it up. Because there is just one exhaust manifold on an inline engine (which is practically all four-cylinder engines), you don’t have to bother about which side of the engine it is on. Sensor 1 will be the first in a series of sensors. The O2 sensor receives a voltage from the PCM, which is around 450mV. This voltage is expected to alter when the engine heats up. If it fails to do so (or does it too slowly), the P0134 error code will be triggered. This video is incredibly useful in understanding how to do P0134: P0134:

Honda Civic P0134 Causes

Many distinct factors might cause the P0134 code to be displayed in the Civic’s instrument panel. A list of frequent probable reasons for P0134 in general may be seen below:

  • Wiring – Bank 1 Sensor 1 is not going to be particularly difficult to locate the majority of the time. Inspect the harness at the point where it connects to the oxygen sensor with a flashlight. Check to see that the pins are in good condition and that the harness is not cracked when it is installed. Make sure that the wiring is not frayed or shorted as well during this inspection process. YouTube video on how to check for a short
  • Bad O2 Sensor – The oxygen sensor can malfunction on its own. This is a common source of the error code P0134. Putting it back in without first checking the wiring that leads to and from it is a gamble that will almost always pay off, but it’s still a good idea to check your harness connections and inspect it first
  • P0134 is caused by an exhaust leak, which can be found in some cars. It should be possible for you to listen for it and locate it
  • P0134 can be caused by an intake manifold leak if there is a leak in the intake manifold. When an intake leak occurs, it frequently has an impact on the vehicle’s ability to idle properly. Learn how to test an intake manifold at www.knowyourparts.com. Coolant Temperature Sensor – A faulty coolant temperature sensor will result in the error code P0134. It is possible to disrupt the feedback loop between the engine’s computer and the temperature sensor if the engine’s computer receives incorrect information about how warm it is. Fuse in the heater circuit is blown

Conclusion

There are a variety of difficulties that might result in the Honda Civic displaying the P0134 code.

The O2 sensor or the wiring to it will be the most common source of failure. Please let us know if there is anything you think we could do to enhance or add to this post by leaving a comment in the section below.

P0134 code after new O2 sensor

I’m making an effort. Obviously, things are not going so well. The first step is to acknowledge that you have a problem. Wait, that’s the incorrect software. Three strikes: (1) purchasing an oxygen sensor instead of a LAF sensor, (2) considering paying stealership prices for the 36531-PLR-003 Honda sensor, and (3) purchasing an oxygen sensor instead of a LAF sensor. (3)? The flame suit is activated. The ones who are the most cost-effective frequently wind up paying the most. It might be quite costly to use the wrong parts.

  1. As a result of reading discussions on this forum (as well as Honda Tech), I was led to assume that Honda’s LAFsensor and main O2 sensor are the same thing (made in the same place) Bacon and steak are also sourced from the same location.
  2. Is it necessary for me to convey this to you as well?
  3. To the untrained eye (and sometimes even mine!
  4. After then, there are no more parallels.
  5. They do not function in the same way.
  6. except that the inexpensive one I purchased will need to be chopped and soldered.
  7. If you’re correct, then I’m completely incorrect.
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If you understand what you DON’T know, you will fare better in management than the majority.

It’s difficult to mess up blue-white, white-green, and blacks-blacks, isn’t it?

Afterwards, I reread the directions and doubled my efforts.

Is this the correct hole?

It is now located in either the front or back.

In the hopes of getting the heat to come up faster, I put it in the header of the computer.

1) It is dependent on the location.

(I’m not able to see what you’re holding.) The sensor must be placed in the stream of all four cylinders, rather than simply one.

Because of its close closeness to the engine, it is largely insignificant.

You didn’t include the incorrect components, such as your time, gas, and my consultation charge, in your calculations.

I’m going to require your credit card information in order to continue my work here.

The price listed in my catalog is $326.xx USD.

I’m not sure if you’ll be able to ship it up there.

Time is also money, after all.

Even brand new automobiles.

Yes, it was my fault (I accept it), however I corrected the incorrect wiring issue and am still experiencing problems.

Do they also sell Bosch Platinums, by the way?

Parts stores are places where you can buy parts.

Because the sensor will fit in the hole, it must be in the proper position.

Because no one there is really responsible for fixing the automobiles, this does not figure into any choices made there. Do you want it in a larger size? Unfortunately, this is not the case. Every single person I know is a truck driver! They are also prone to breaking.

2004 Honda civic Coupe LX Check Engine P0134

My best effort is to do so. Obviously, things aren’t going well. The first step is admitting that you have a problem. There’s a problem, the wrong software was selected. A total of three strikes include (1) purchasing an oxygen sensor instead of a LAF sensor, (2) contemplating paying stealership prices for the 36531-PLR-003 Honda sensor, and (3) purchasing an oxygen sensor instead of a LAF sensor. (3)? Putting on the flame suit It’s common for the cheapest folks to be saddled with the most debt.

  • Parts that are in perfect working order are quite valuable.
  • Is it fair to say that they are the same as one another?
  • In terms of fit and function, the sensors are identical.
  • After then, the parallels end.
  • Each one performs differently.
  • except for the fact that the inexpensive one I purchased has to be chopped and soldered together.
  • You are correct if you believe that I am incorrect.

If you are aware of what you DON’T know, you will fare better in management than the majority of your colleagues will.

To muck up blue-white, white-green, and blacks-blacks combinations is difficult, isn’t it?

Afterwards, I doubled my efforts by reading the directions.

Did I put my finger in the right hole?

Right now it’s in either the front or the back.

An additional blunder.

What do you prefer: a single downpipe or the entire collector system.

(I can’t see what you have.) Secondly, the sensor is equipped with a heater of its own.

Yes, and the parts for this project are going to cost me $338.86.

My hourly rate is ten dollars per minute in US dollars.

I’m deserving of it since I haven’t been a complete and utter jerk to you yet.

I’m not sure if it will be possible to transport it up there.

An engine light will illuminate on any automobile at some point.

The problem existed (I accept it), but I was able to resolve it by correcting the incorrect wiring.

Is it also true that they sell Bosch Platinums as well?

Purchasing parts from a parts store is a good idea.

It is necessary that the sensor fits inside the hole in order for it to be accurate.

Because no one there is responsible for fixing the automobiles, this does not enter into any of the decisions made. Interested in a mega-sized version of this? Sadly, this is not the case. A vehicle is driven by everyone I know. Even they suffer from breakdowns from time to time.

p0134

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O2 sensor CEL keeps coming back!

Can someone assist me in determining why my 2018 Civic SI continues to display a CEL for the oxygen sensor? The code p0134 keeps appearing on the screen. An Invidia exhaust system, PRL front and downpipes, an oil catch can, an AEM short ram intake, and a Ktuner tuning system were all purchased by me (Tuned by Derek Robinson). Only after then did this CEL begin to manifest itself.

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Amazon.com: Customer reviews: Denso 234-9017 Air Fuel Ratio Sensor

A direct drop-in replacement for the $240 – $300+ OEM Honda part, this Denso product is available. When a CEL is correctly placed and all codes have been erased, the CEL will disappear immediately upon restarting. According to my memory, if you have a 2001 – 2003 Civic EX, this is the incorrect component since they utilized a different, less costly on-off O2 sensor in the same location, rather than this Denso wideband A/F sensor, which offers gradients for richness and leanness. They are not the same thing – don’t buy an oxygen sensor thinking you’ll save money when the specification calls for a wideband A/F sensor thinking you’ll save money.

  1. I drive a 2004 Honda Civic EX with a D17A2 engine, which I purchased new.
  2. Make certain that the wire is correctly reinstalled in the chassis’ wire holders, otherwise it may come into touch with the exhaust and cause damage to the wire.
  3. Before attaching the sensor pin female receptacles in the connector, I applied a little amount of dielectric grease to the female receptacles to prevent corrosion.
  4. My mileage increased from 31 to 34 following the exchange, despite the fact that I continued to drive in the same manner (with plenty of A/C and strong throttle).
  5. This pricing is more than reasonable for an OEM replacement, especially when you consider the higher cost of a wideband A/F sensor (Honda refers to it as a ‘LAF’ sensor).
  6. – By the way, I read my codes with a Bluetooth code reader that I purchased from Amazon.
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Here is the URL for the advertisement, which you should copy and paste into your browser: psc=1 Because it is the only one among several Bluetooth readers that truly has the required circuitry to handle numerous protocols, as well as current spikes, this code reader stands out (which can brick other cheaper readers).

If you spend $24 for the BAFX and $5 for the full version of Torque on your smartphone, you can read and clear codes on your Honda just as effectively as you could with a $60 – $120 dedicated code reader. ; )

2009 Honda Civic Coupe OBD2 Code P0134 O2 Sensor Circuit No Activity Detected (Bank 1 Sensor 1) – MyCarSpecs Denmark

It is possible that the P0134 diagnostic trouble code indicates that there is an issue with the oxygen sensor, which is located before the catalytic converter and on the engine bank that contains cylinder 1.

What the P0134 code means

To ensure that the oxygen to fuel ratio is accurate, the oxygen sensor measures the amount of oxygen and fuel that exits the engine through the exhaust pipe. When the oxygen sensor detects a decrease in oxygen levels, it communicates that information to the power control module (PCM). It is possible that the power control module (PCM) will reduce the quantity of fuel that is being utilized by the motor if there is insufficient oxygen in the exhaust. A lack of oxygen in the exhaust can cause your 2009 Honda Civic coupe to consume more gasoline and generate more carbon monoxide into the atmosphere, which is detrimental.

If there is inadequate gasoline in the exhaust, your 2009 Honda Civic coupe may spew hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides into the atmosphere, which is harmful to the environment.

What causes the P0134 code?

The millivolt measurement of an oxygen sensor that is correctly functional travels up and down. When the power control module (PCM) determines that the oxygen sensor millivolt is at a standstill and not operating properly, the P0134 fault code will be shown on the instrument panel. This error code can be produced by any of the following factors:

  • The heater circuit is faulty. One or more wires that have been damaged or detached from the oxygen sensor
  • Connector corrosion is a problem. Vacuum leak in the engine
  • Incorrectly configured or malfunctioning power control module (PCM)

What are the symptoms of the P0134 code?

There are a number of problems that you may encounter in conjunction with the P0134 issue code, including:

  • It is possible that the Check Engine Light on the dashboard may illuminate and the engine could stall. You could get the impression that your 2009 Honda Civic coupe is idling badly or that it is running rough. This is quite normal. You may also notice a stench that is comparable to rotten eggs, as well as black smoke pouring from the exhaust. Except for the Check Engine Light being illuminated, there are times when a motorist will not notice any of the symptoms listed above
  • However, this is a very unusual occurrence.

How does a mechanic diagnose the P0134 code?

The P0134 error code will be diagnosed by a technician using an OBD-II scanner. It is necessary to record freeze frame data in order to establish when the code was initially set. At this time, the code should be reset and the 2009 Honda Civic coupe should be tested. During the test drive, your 2009 Honda Civic coupe must achieve normal operating temperature in order to determine whether or not the code has been reset. If the error code does return, it is necessary to verify the wiring that connects the oxygen sensor to the earth and the battery.

It is necessary to monitor live data in order to establish whether the millivolt valves are switching from low to high voltage.

Common mistakes when diagnosing the P0134 code

When troubleshooting the P0134 fault code, it is typical to make the mistake of assuming that the oxygen sensor is the first item that has to be changed without taking into account alternative options. Sometimes the oxygen sensor itself is not the problem, and there are other factors that can prevent the oxygen sensor from functioning properly, such as the wiring that connects the oxygen sensor and the oxygen sensor itself.

Before replacing the oxygen sensor, it is recommended that the wiring be checked and ruled out as the source of the problem.

How serious is the P0134 code?

It is unlikely that the P0134 fault code would prohibit your 2009 Honda Civic coupe from starting and running; nevertheless, drivers may notice a lack of power as a result of the issue. It is possible that driving with a P0134 fault code can cause damage to the catalytic converter, but this will take a long length of time. What is most concerning about this problem code is that it is normal for there to be a loss in fuel economy, which means that your 2009 Honda Civic coupe will burn more gasoline at a faster rate of speed than usual.

What repairs can fix the P0134 code?

  • The technician should scan the problem code with a scanner to ensure that it is correct. Immediately following validation of a fault code, the vehicle should be reset, and a test drive should be conducted. If the Check Engine Light illuminates again with the same fault code, an examination should be performed
  • The wires and connectors should be checked for signs of wear and tear. If any of the wires or connections are broken, they should be fixed or replaced as appropriate. Reset the trouble code and do a test drive. It will be necessary to replace the oxygen sensor if the Check Engine Light illuminates again and the technician receives the same code as before. The exhaust pipe and heater fuse should be checked to see if they have been damaged after the oxygen sensor was replaced. If the P0134 error code returns after the oxygen sensor has been replaced.

Additional comments for consideration regarding the P0134 code

The oxygen sensor itself will most likely need to be replaced with a new one in the majority of cases. However, before replacing the oxygen sensor, it is necessary to rule out the possibility of a problem with the wires and connectors. Whether you have repaired or replaced the wiring, connections, or oxygen sensor in your 2009 Honda Civic coupe, it is critical that you test drive your vehicle to check if the fault code returns before going on to the next probable problem. Following a thorough inspection of the wiring and/or connector(s) and replacement of the oxygen sensor, there are some less probable options for why the failure code was generated.

It’s also conceivable that the exhaust pipe has holes or has rusted excessively due to corrosion.

Need help with a P0134 code?

P0134 is a fault code that appears on the Check Engine Light. SCHEDULE P0134 DIAGNOSTIC APPLICATIONS

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