Voltmeter fluctuates GM Trucks? (The answer is found)

  • GM says fluctuating voltage on the vehicle’s voltmeter is NORMAL and is not a reason to replace any parts. The TSB applies to 2005-08 Cadillac Escalade, 2005-08 avlanche, Silverado, Silverado Classic, Suburban, Tahoe, 2005-08 GMC Sierra, Sierra Classic, and Yukon.

What causes a voltmeter to fluctuate?

When the battery’s state of charge is low, the voltage is raised slightly to quickly put the charge back in. When the state of charge is high, the voltage is lowered slightly to prevent overcharging. If the vehicle has a voltmeter gauge, you may see the voltage move up or down. This is normal.

What causes battery gauge to drop?

At idle, vehicle electrical loads may exceed the low speed current (amperage) output of the generator and when this happens the shortfall comes from the battery. This will result in a drop in the electrical system voltage as the battery delivers the additional electrical current to meet the demand.

What should the battery gauge read in a truck?

Fully charged automotive batteries should measure at 12.6 volts or above. When the engine is running, this measurement should be 13.7 to 14.7 volts. If you don’t have a multimeter to tell you the voltage of your battery, you can do a test of your electrical system by starting the car and turning on the headlights.

Why is my battery gauge below 14?

Dropping below 14 means either the battery is weak and unreliable for sustained vehicle operation or the alternator is failing. The alternator’s job is to generate energy to feed the electrical system and charge the battery while the vehicle is running.

What are the symptoms of a failing alternator?

4 Symptoms of a Faulty Alternator

  • Car Won’t Start. A dead battery almost always lies behind a car that won’t start.
  • Engine Stalling. A dead alternator almost always leads to a car that won’t start.
  • Electrical Issues. A dying alternator can lead to a wide range of other electrical issues.
  • Unusual Sounds.

Can a bad battery cause voltage fluctuations?

That’s normal. The slower the engine is running and the higher the electrical load is it will cause voltage to drop slightly but if you increase engine RPM the volts should rise.

What are the signs of a bad battery?

5 Unmistakable Signs Your Car Battery is Failing

  • Dim headlights. If your car battery is failing, it’s not going to be able to fully power your vehicle’s electrical components – including your headlights.
  • Clicking sound when you turn the key.
  • Slow crank.
  • Needing to press on the gas pedal to start.
  • Backfiring.

Can a bad ground cause alternator failure?

Poor ground connections are an often-overlooked cause of low charging output and alternator failure. Voltage drops on the positive side of the charging circuit can cause undercharging.

What are the symptoms of a voltage regulator going bad?

Bad Voltage Regulator Symptoms

  • Too High Voltage in the Battery. There are two ways a voltage regulator can fail.
  • Dead Battery.
  • Battery Light or Check Engine Light.
  • Inconsistent Operation of Electrical Components.
  • Vehicle Dies While Running.
  • Dimming/Pulsing Lights.

How long does a GM battery last?

Vehicle batteries on average last 3-5 years depending on a number of factors including driving habits and climate. In general, warmer climates tend to increase damage due to sulfation. Also, long periods of time spent in a discharged state will shorten the life of a battery.

What is a normal operating range for a CMV oil pressure gauge?

During normal operation, forward-rear and rear-rear axle oil temperature gauges should read between 160 to 220°F (71 to 104°C) for Meritor axles, and 80 to 200°F (82 to 93°C) for Dana Spicer drive axles.

Can a bad alternator ruin a battery?

When an alternator goes bad, there is a chance it can overcharge the battery. When an alternator overcharges the battery, it will result in an excessively high voltage, and this will end up in a premature cell. ripple voltage is fatal because it can not only kill the battery but also the entire electronics of the car.

How low can a car battery voltage go?

A low battery voltage means that a car battery’s charge is too low such that it can only start an engine then it fails. Low car battery ranges from 11.8 to 12 V and this shows that a car owner should consider recharging the battery and in case one has low voltage due to damage getting a new one.

Is the alternator a generator?

An alternator is a type of electric generator used in modern automobiles to charge the battery and to power the electrical system when its engine is running.

Voltmeter fluctuates GM Trucks

A technical service bulletin07-06-03-009 has been released by General Motors (GM) concerns Voltmeter fluctuation in GM trucks. According to General Motors, fluctuating voltage on the vehicle’s voltmeter is NORMAL and does not indicate the need to repair any components. Affected vehicles include the 2005-2008 Cadillac Escalade, 2005-2008 Avlanche, Chevrolet Silverado, Silverado Classic, Suburban and Tahoe, as well as the 2005-2008 GMC Sierra and Yukon. It is not necessary to employ an alternator decoupler in these automobiles’ charging systems in order to improve gas mileage.

This device is controlled by the PCM and is responsible for adjusting the amount of ‘field’ applied to the generator.

When the system is operating in ‘Fuel Economy Mode,’ the intended voltage in these systems ranges between 12.6 and 13.1 volts.

Consequently, the vehicle owner may observe a fluctuation in the voltage meter from 12 to 14 volts while starting the car.

It is not necessary to change any components of the charging system.

You may push the system into Charge Mode by putting the car into tow/haul mode, or by simply turning on the vehicle’s headlights (if equipped).

Rick Muscoplat was born in the year 2012.

Read more: Voltmeter fluctuates GM Trucks? (The answer is found)

voltage fluctuate on the dasboard meter

In this document, you will find information about voltage meter gauge fluctuations caused by a regulated voltage control system and safety concerns with camper/trailer battery charging. Models: Cadillac Escalade Models from 2005 to 2009. Chevrolet Avalanche, Silverado, Silverado Classic, Suburban, and Tahoe models from 2005 to 2009. Models of the GMC Sierra, Sierra Classic, and Yukon from 2005 to 2009. Condition of the Voltmeter’s Fluctuation: Some customers may notice that the voltmeter on their full-size pickup or utility vehicle is oscillating between 12 and 14 volts.

  1. Regulated Voltage Control (RVC) systems are now standard on light-duty full-size trucks and utility vehicles beginning with the 2005 model year.
  2. If greater voltage is necessary, the generator may be forced to quit ‘Fuel Economy Mode.’ Consequently, voltmeter readings will range between 12 and 14 volts, rather than the more steady reading of 14 volts that non-regulated systems often maintain.
  3. Camping/Trailer Battery Charging Issues:Some customers have expressed concern that while towing or carrying a camper/trailer, the camper/auxiliary trailer’s battery would not remain charged.
  4. As a result, when the ‘Fuel Economy Mode’ function is activated, the RVC system reduces the generator’s desired output voltage to 12.6-13.1 volts, although this feature is skipped if the tow/haul option is enabled.
  5. The following two ways can be used to maintain the generator in ‘Charge Mode’ while it is running.

When towing or dragging a camper or trailer, the first approach is to use the tow/haul mode on the vehicle. The second approach is to switch on the headlights, which will raise the intended output voltage of the generator to 13.9-14.5 volts, which is more than enough to power the generator.

Alt voltage fluctuating

Bring your VIN number as well as your old alternator to the location where you will be purchasing a replacement alternator. Inquire about the maximum amperage alternator that will fit in the space where the old alternator was removed. The ratio of alt rpm to engine rpm will alter depending on the size of the pulley. A larger pulley results in a slower rotational speed. In most cases, until the battery is totally charged, you will not notice any sudden voltage fluctuations. The battery serves as a voltage buffer or conditioner in the event of voltage surges.

  • It appears that a 12 volt auto battery is actually a 13.2volt auto battery, according to the printed materials I had from trade school back in the late 1970s (6 cells, each cell 2.2v).
  • Once it passes the 15.3 threshold, it enters the territory of overcharging.
  • Looking online today, I notice that they have either updated the data or that the average battery structure has changed, and that each cell now produces 2.1v, resulting in a 6 cell battery producing 12.6v, which is incorrect.
  • I wouldn’t be shocked if the volt meter acted differently once the batteries was replaced.
  • When comparing a fully charged battery to a fully depleted battery, you will notice a more rapid shift in the voltmeter reading.
  • According to my observations, the first things to go out are the front park lights, headlights, and signal bulbs, which are all overcharged.

Voltage Gauge fluctuations

Owner’s Instruction Manual Management of Electric Power Sources This car is equipped with Electric Power Management (EPM), which evaluates the temperature and level of charge of the battery. It then adjusts the voltage to provide the greatest performance and the longest possible battery life. As soon as the battery’s state of charge falls below a certain threshold, the voltage is boosted slightly in order to swiftly recharge it. When the state of charge is high, the voltage is somewhat reduced in order to avoid overcharging from occurring.

  1. This is quite normal.
  2. BULLETIN OF THE GENERAL MANAGER Document ID 2042756 has been assigned to this document.
  3. Chevrolet Avalanche, Silverado, Silverado Classic, Suburban, and Tahoe models from 2005 to 2008.
  4. Condition of the Voltmeter’s Fluctuation Some customers may notice that the voltmeter on their full-size pickup or utility vehicle is oscillating between 12 and 14 volts.
  5. Regulated Voltage Control (RVC) systems are now standard on light-duty full-size trucks and utility vehicles beginning with the 2005 model year.
  6. If greater voltage is necessary, the generator may be forced to quit ‘Fuel Economy Mode.’ Consequently, voltmeter readings will range between 12 and 14 volts, rather than the more steady reading of 14 volts that non-regulated systems often maintain.
  7. Concerns Regarding the Charging of Camper/Trailer Batteries Some customers have expressed concern that while towing or transporting a camper or trailer, the auxiliary battery for the camper or trailer does not remain charged.
  8. As a result, when the ‘Fuel Economy Mode’ function is activated, the RVC system reduces the generator’s desired output voltage to 12.6-13.1 volts, although this feature is skipped if the tow/haul option is enabled.

The following two ways can be used to maintain the generator in ‘Charge Mode’ while it is running.

  • When towing or dragging a camper or trailer, the first approach is to utilize the tow/haul mode
  • The second method is to switch on the headlights, which will boost the generator’s desired output voltage to 13.9-14.5 volts
  • And the third option is to use the reverse gear.
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In contrast to ‘do-it-yourselfers,’ General Motors bulletins are intended for use by professional personnel. Specifically, they are created in order to alert these professionals of situations that may develop on certain cars, or to offer information that may be useful in the correct service of a vehicle. Technicians that have received sufficient training have the necessary equipment, tools, safety instructions, and know-how to complete a work correctly and safely. In the event that a condition is stated, DO NOT assume that the advisory relates to your vehicle or that your vehicle will be affected by the condition.

WE SUPPORT THE CERTIFICATION OF VOLUNTARY TECHNICIANS.

Voltage Gauge Fluctuates High Then Low Why?

For starters, dash gauges are notoriously unreliable sources of information. All they’re useful for is making you aware of when anything is out of the ordinary. The best place to begin is by monitoring the voltage of the battery while the engine is running. It has to be between 13.75 and 14.75 volts to be considered safe. (I’m particularly interested in knowing whether it moves beyond that range when the lights are turned on or off.) Second, there is no way to sugarcoat what has happened. Your generator is the worst-designed thing on the face of the planet.

  1. They were completely changed for the 1987 model year, and the result has been a major problem.
  2. The average vehicle will require four to six replacement generators throughout the course of its life, but replacing the battery at the same time can help to limit the number of recurring failures.
  3. However, when batteries age and lead flakes from the plates, they lose their capacity to dampen and absorb voltage spikes and instead become more erratic and unpredictable.
  4. I have a suspicion that your battery possesses a property that is detrimental to the generator’s long-term survival.
  5. It appears that you require another new generator; however, if you experience issues again, replace the battery with the one that was originally installed in your car.
  6. It is only the first portion of the test that involves measuring battery voltage while the engine is running.
  7. You must measure the maximum current output and ‘ripple’ voltage while the machine is fully loaded.
  8. One of the six diodes on these generators will fail, which is a very typical occurrence on these machines, and you will only be able to get one-third of their rated current.
  9. Over several days or weeks, the battery will have to make up the difference until it is completely depleted.

This will often cause the generator to kick on as it should, then switch off, resulting in brilliant lights for a short period of time, followed by faint lights. AT 12:17 p.m. on Wednesday, June 2nd, 2021 (Merged)

What Does It Mean When Battery Gauge Goes Up And Down?

The battery is an essential component of every vehicle. If your battery is not functioning properly, the remainder of your vehicle will not function properly as well. The most common problem that occurs with batteries is that they lose their charge or become ineffective at charging over time. Batteries become less capable of storing a charge as they get older. Some automobiles have a battery gauge mounted on the dashboard, and the needle might occasionally hop around. Is the needle leaping a sign that your battery is failing?

What Does It Mean When the Battery Gauge Increases and Decreases?

Battery Gauge

In order to understand what it means when your battery gauge fluctuates, we must first understand what the battery gauge on your dashboard is truly displaying on your dashboard. Although not all automobiles are equipped with a battery gauge on the dashboard, it is a convenient feature to have because the battery gauge is essentially a voltmeter that is permanently attached to your battery. A voltmeter is a gadget that is used to determine how much power is stored in a battery by measuring the voltage.

It is for this reason that it is concerning when it jumps about while driving.

Why Shouldn’t Battery Gauge Goes Up And Down?

The reason why the needle should not move while driving may be beyond your comprehension. You could be thinking that because the radio, headlights, and other components of the car are drawing power from the battery while driving, the needle shouldn’t be moving down. During it is true that power is being drawn from the battery while driving, it is equally true that power is being supplied to the battery when driving. The alternator is designed to do this. So, is the fact that the needle in the battery gauge is bouncing about indicate that the battery is bad?

Alternator Problem

Your alternator is in charge of converting any excess mechanical power generated by your engine into electrical energy, which is then used to replenish or maintain the battery’s charging capacity. The fact that the needle is hopping indicates that the battery is not receiving the same amount of charge on a constant basis. When the needle jumps on the gauge, it does not necessarily indicate that the battery is defective; instead, if the battery is not retaining a charge, it will merely cause the needle to not rise as high on the gauge, but it will not cause the needle to jump on the gauge itself.

The first thing to Check

The serpentine or alternator drive belt should be the first item you examine if your car’s battery indicator is bouncing around. The belt is responsible for connecting the engine to the alternator, and if the belt is not functioning properly, the alternator will not function properly as well. When inspecting the belt, you should pay attention to two points. The wear of the belt and the tension of the belt are the two factors to consider. If the belt is beginning to show signs of wear, it may cause the tension to shift while driving.

You may be able to resolve all of your issues with the battery gauge jumping by switching to a different belt.

The belt requires tension in order to be able to transfer power from the engine to the alternator effectively.

If the belt is too slack, it has the potential to slip, preventing the alternator wheel from spinning and, as a result, preventing the alternator from working properly.

However, you do not want to overtighten it because doing so might make it difficult to spin for the opposite reason as described above. Additionally, wearing a belt that is excessively tight might result in it breaking or wearing out sooner.

Testing Alternator

Connecting a voltmeter to the battery is the quickest and most straightforward method of checking the alternator at home. If the belt appears to be in good condition and is the proper tightness, but you are still experiencing difficulties with the battery gauge jumping, you will need to have the alternator tested. Connecting a voltmeter to the battery is the quickest and most straightforward method of checking the alternator at home. When the automobile is running, the battery voltage should be approximately 14.4 volts and should not fluctuate.

It is necessary to get your alternator checked thoroughly by a professional if the reading is bouncing around.

Corrosion

Before passing judgment on the alternator, it’s important to note that if the wires aren’t properly connected or damaged, the battery gauge might fluctuate dramatically. It is critical that your cables are kept clean and that they are linked firmly to the battery. Before replacing the alternator, clean off any rust and tie down any loose wires, unless you are certain that it is faulty in some way. Reading spikes can be caused by faulty connections, and it is far less expensive to clean and tighten wires than it is to replace the alternator.

Conclusion

You should now understand what it means when your battery gauge fluctuates in and out of range. You are aware that this does not necessarily indicate a problem with the battery, but rather that you are experiencing problems with the alternator. You should have a better understanding of why this is happening, and you should also be aware of certain items to check and possible solutions to the problem. You are aware that you must inspect all of the wire connections and clean any corrosion. You are also aware that the alternator belt should be checked and replaced if it is worn, or that it should be properly tightened.

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Because your car’s battery is essential to its operation, you should ensure that it is fully charged before you become stuck someplace.

Mike CrossLife is just too short to be driven with the standard soundtrack.

Voltage fluctuation

When the batteries were load tested, one of them was on the point of failing. I’ll be replacing both and saving one for my fuel pump and the other for my firebird because it’s still in quite decent condition. I recently changed the alternatorbyes, which is a bummer because it’s only a 145 amp, when the one I removed had just 40,000 kilometers on it and was a 160-180 amp one used for ambulances and other heavy-duty vehicles, which is why it’s a bummer. When I added a 2-4 gauge wire and grounded it to the frame, I also installed another ground from the negative terminal of the same battery to the ground bracket off the engine block, which was previously unconnected.

  1. The same may be said about blocking access to firewalls and other security measures.
  2. I live in Saskatchewan, Canada, where temperatures range from -45 degrees Celsius to +35 degrees Celsius on an annual basis.
  3. Having followed all the rules, he received an improved vehicle, a stunning new white dually.
  4. I’m not in the least bit enraged.
  5. There is rust below (the last shop complained about it), but they didn’t complain when they soaked me for $1700 dollars.
  6. Also, out of curiosity, I have three glow plugs that are failing, and I’m wondering whether this would have an impact on the power surge or drop?
  7. I do not have vast funds.
  8. Glow plugs were detected by a shop code reader, yet there are no concerns when the machine is first powered up.

The new grounding and alternator have reduced the amount of voltage that is lost by around 1.5 volts, but it is still a problem. It’s easily discernible. Thank you for taking the time to respond. I’ll double-check the starting ground on Sunday.

Volt Gauge Question 2007

While being loaded tested, one of the batteries was on the approach of failing. I’ll be replacing both and saving the one for my fuel pump and the other for my firebird, since it’s still in quite excellent working condition. This is a bummer because the alternatorbyes is only 145 amps, and the one I removed had only 40,000 kilometers on it and was a 160-180 amp alternator designed for ambulances and other heavy duty vehicles, which is a 160-180 amp alternator designed specifically for ambulances and other heavy duty vehicles.

  • Also removed and dismantled that, wire wheeled the bolt and brackets to a gleaming shine, and then reassembled everything.
  • No corrosion can be found on any of the battery terminal connections.
  • Was a farm truck, and I am the second owner of this particular vehicle.
  • Failure occurs in the operation of vehicles and equipment.
  • Inquiring about other people’s ideas for solving this problem.
  • I’ll see if I can find the location of the starter ground.
  • In the event that one were to snapnupon removal for replacement, my truck would be parked because I cannot afford the machining costs associated with removing them.
  • The fact that this truck provides food for my family necessitates my maintaining it.
  • All that is noticeable while driving is the power surge and voltage drop.
  • It’s easily discerned.

2019 Silverado battery gauge surges

When there is a demand on the battery, such as lighting or air conditioning, 11 volts looks a little low, but the question is how accurate is the dash gauge? In the dash, is there a digital or analog type volt gauge to read? Having the voltage measured while driving using an OBD2 scan gauge or even a voltage meter connected to the battery or front 12v accessory connector may provide a more accurate value for comparison. Do your headlights appear to fade or flash at all throughout the night when your car is idle, signaling that the battery is running short on charge?

However, the good news is that you are still covered by your manufacturer’s warranty, and you may discuss your concerns with a service technician, who could then run the tests to check whether the voltage really does drop below 11 volts while monitoring the charging system.

It is recommended that you keep your hood unlocked overnight to avoid opening the door and letting anything drip down.

A healthy AM voltage reading at the battery should be about 12.4volts. Suspension for a 1997 Buick Park Avenue (Soft Ride)! Soft Ride last modified this post on 07-17-2019 at 04:07 PM. The reason is to include a battery test.

Battery gauge too low?

Document ID2000522 2007 GMC Yukon XL Denali (Document ID2000522) – Subject: Voltmeter Gage Fluctuation – Keywords: battery charge camper cluster electrical extreme fluctuation gage gauge generator intermittent ipc lamp light low operation trailer towing tow volt voltage wire Subject: voltmeter gauge fluctuation PIT3331D – (July 27th, 2007) Cadillac Escalade, ESV, and EXT models from 2005 to 2008.

  1. Chevrolet Avalanche, Silverado, Silverado Classic, Suburban, and Tahoe models from 2005 to 2008.
  2. If the vehicle displays the symptom(s) indicated in this PI, the following diagnosis may be of assistance to the driver.
  3. Light-duty full-size trucks and utility vehicles, beginning with the 2005 model year, are equipped with a new Regulated Voltage Control (RVC) technology.
  4. If greater voltage is necessary, the alternator may be forced to quit ‘Fuel Economy Mode.’ If the voltage is fluctuating between 12 and 14 volts, as opposed to non-regulated systems, which normally maintain a more stable reading of 14 volts, the system is considered regulated.
  5. The voltage gauge’s regular functioning range is seen in the illustration below.
  6. Please carefully follow the steps in this diagnostic or repair procedure and finish each step.
  7. In contrast to ‘do-it-yourselfers,’ General Motors bulletins are intended for use by professional personnel.
  8. Technicians that have received sufficient training have the necessary equipment, tools, safety instructions, and know-how to complete a work correctly and safely.
  9. Inquire with your local General Motors dealer to determine whether your car might benefit from the information.

WE SUPPORT VOLUNTARY TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION General Motors Corporation copyright protected by law. All Intellectual Property Rights are Reserved. – Document ID2000522 2007 GMC Yukon XL Denali (Document ID2000522)

Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage – Chevy Message Forum

Username Post: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage(Topic 86162)
thealexdexterMember Posts: 177Reg: 01-03-05User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile 01-03-05 11:50 AM-Post5905652001 silverado 4×4 x-cab 5.3LLTMy voltmeter will randomly drop from approx 14 to 11 then back up to 14.sometimes it will stay at 11 for 5-10 seconds then rise to 14. sometimes it jumps back and forth. it happens 3-4 times per week.this happens under no load(no ac/pwoer windows/lights etc) and with any/all electrical items on.sometimes the engine idle drops/runs rough when the voltage drops, sometimes not. never does the idle drop and the voltage remian constant though.sometimes the truck dies when the voltage dropsthe guy at schucks tested the battery and alternator and said they were fine. the truck always starts and runs fine. it does it wheter it is hot or cold outside.to make it even wierder.sometimes the electricity completely goes out, to the point that I have to enter the security code on the radio.this is rare (1-2 times per year).any thoughts on what is happening? could this too be the AC delco battery problem i’ve been reading on other posts?i really don’t want to start replacing alternators/voltage regs at random becasue they are very expensive.thanks for any and all helpalex
backupMember Posts: 39Reg: 07-30-04User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-03-05 02:23 PM-Post590566 In response tothealexdexterI got something similar to yours, and posted a while ago but didn’t have any reponses.Mine is more of consistent fast voltage fluctuation evident by pulsing lights, sometimes worse than others.I also have a voltage drop that is very similar to what you described, but not all the time.If I rev it off idle to about 2000, then release, it almost dies, the volts go to 11 and it struggles for about 2 seconds then it recovers.I don’t know much about the electrical system, so I’m really lost on this one.I’m about ready to replace the alternator (or coerce my dealer into replacing the alternator – they’ve been little help so far since the problem produces no codes, nothing is actually broken).Is there a separate voltage regulator or is it part of the alternator?I’ve got an 04 5.3.Good luck.
AnonymousUser InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-03-05 06:19 PM-Post590567 In response tobackupsounds to me like it could be the all to troublesome positive battery side post, if you guys have the original ac delco battery I would definatly check the positive battery terminal to see if it has any type of corrosion or possible leakage they are notoriuos for leaking or even busting the seal between the battery and the post. Be aware it will look like it is tight and evrything will look normal when you look at it but it’s looks are very decieving. Best way to check, borrow a battery from a buddy or a spouse or whatever, put it in your truck see if the problem still exist, if so nothing is lost and you have eliminated the battery from the equation. next step would be to check all the grounds on the truck, clean and wire brush em really good, then i would look at an alternator next.also if you have any aftermarket accesories check all the wiring on them very wellhope this helpspost back with results and what you find
ozman2005Member Posts: 17Loc: Lansing, MichiganReg: 10-21-03User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-04-05 06:14 AM-Post590568 In response tothealexdexterI had very similar problems with my previous ’01 Tahoe.Every time I would come to a stop, the engine would almost die and the volts would drop.It would recover, but it always did it every time I drove it.Sometimes just sitting idling it would also almost die.I changed the PCV for the first time at about 70k, which cleared up the idle problem for a little while.Like you, I also had the entire electrical system die a couple times a year, causing me to enter the code on the radio.Never did figure out either problem, dealers were also no help (surprise, surprise).Traded it with about 85k on it, dealer gave me what I wanted for it and a great deal on my ’04 so I took it and ran.Ozzie2004 Suburban LT 4×4, 5.3, Silver Birch, Bose 6 CD Changer, XM, OnStar, RSE, Sunroof 2005 Pontiac G6, 3.5 V6, Ivory White, XM 2001 Tahoe LT 4×2, 5.3, Indigo Blue, OnStar – Sold
thealexdexterMember Posts: 177Reg: 01-03-05User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-04-05 08:17 AM-Post590569 In response tothealexdexterI guess I should add some more information as I remember it.It does drop voltage very often as I come to a stop (the last few second or so). After one-two seconds the volage rises back up to 14 and generally stays.I took a peek at the battery cables last night they are corrosion free and the terminals feel tight in the battery. it is the original AC Delco battery.I did notice some acid in the tray under the battery. About a 1/4′ wide and 3′ long patch of it.I cant really tell where it is coming from as the posts are clean, the vents out of the battery are clean. The battery has a ‘green eye’ indicating it is in good shape.Guess I’ll look for a spare battery and see if the problem goes away.
thealexdexterMember Posts: 177Reg: 01-03-05User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-04-05 09:31 AM-Post590570 In response tothealexdexterHey.what’s the best battery to buy?I was thinking Exide ORB78DT-84.They have online for$80.take the ad to schucks and they price match it.***************2015 CC 3500 Duramax Sierra All Terrain 4×4 SLT inBlack2008 Yukon Denali inBlack
nodakbassmasterSuper Senior Member Posts: 4397Loc: Poorhouse, SDReg: 03-14-04User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-04-05 10:56 AM-Post590571 In response tothealexdexterOptima Red Top!I love mine. what a difference it made in the charging system! My.02 anyway. They are a bit pricey though.Richard’09 Silverado 3500HD CC LB D/A LTZ Z71, Mods Annonymous Member3
thealexdexterMember Posts: 177Reg: 01-03-05User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-05-05 05:44 PM-Post590572 In response tonodakbassmasterI put in a new battery. the voltage still swings, but not as much as it used to. It goes from 14 to about 13.The battery is a little undersized than stock. Stock is 600CCAthis is is 530CCA.I tried it with everything on and off. No difference.Any other thoughts on what could be causing the swing?***************2015 CC 3500 Duramax Sierra All Terrain 4×4 SLT inBlack2008 Yukon Denali inBlack
AnonymousUser InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-05-05 06:00 PM-Post590573 In response tothealexdexterI really dont think it would be your alternator however I could be wrong, if they tested it and said it’s ok I dont see how you could dispute that.Next I would try pulling fuses, pull one fuse at a time start vehicle and see if the problem is gone, if not shut off vehicle and go to the next one, just dont pull the ones that will disable the truck.If this does not solve the problem I would probaly take in to a dealer myself. Electical problems can be a nightmarealso you may want to check this post out took me a while to go thru several searches, it looks like this guy had the exact same problem you had, he only had one post on the issue and no replies so maybe he solved the problem.just email or pm him see if he replies.
FigmomanValued Contributor Posts: 2935Loc: Wilton, CaliforniaReg: 11-01-03User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-06-05 03:29 AM-Post590574 In response tothealexdexterAnother vote for Optima red top. Its not going to leak from a side post and ruin the battery tray. It will last a long time.1960 Impala Sport Coupe. 348 PG1972 K-10 short wide. 350 4 speed 2000 Chevy Suburban 1500 2wd 5.3 1965 Pontiac GTO hardtop, 462 tri-power TKO-600, 3.90 12 bolt. 2008 Audi A4 2.0 turbo 6sp manual.
dukeofbluzSenior Member Posts: 883Loc: ILReg: 12-15-03User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-07-05 12:32 PM-Post590575 In response toFigmomanI have had this problem for a year now, seems worse in the winter. I think out of habbit now we all watch our volt meter everytime we come to a stop but I really think the problem has nothing to do with the electrical system, I think its the RMPs drop to about 300 and this is not enough RPM to excite the Alternator. When I come to a stop my RPMs drop to 300 for a second, the lights dim a bit and the blower motor seems to slow but the RPMs go right back to 500 and everything goes back to normal.JeffreyMY YOUTUBE VIDEO!MY PICTURE TRAIL
thealexdexterMember Posts: 177Reg: 01-03-05User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-07-05 01:16 PM-Post590576 In response todukeofbluzI might tend to agree with the idle thing.How am I gonna prove that though?***************2015 CC 3500 Duramax Sierra All Terrain 4×4 SLT inBlack2008 Yukon Denali inBlack
AnonymousUser InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-07-05 03:20 PM-Post590577 In response tothealexdexterIf the idle problem is causing this it should be easier to trace than the electical problem. I would start with cleaning the maf sensor here’s a good link on that subject. PHPSESSID=could also be the fuel pressure regulator there are some good threads hereas well on replacing that
thealexdexterMember Posts: 177Reg: 01-03-05User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-08-05 03:04 PM-Post590578 In response toI cleaned the MAF sensor and the problem seems to have gone away. I’ve only driven it around the block though. Give me a few days and I’ll post back if it actually solved it.The sensors themselves weren’t dirty.at least none came off on the Q-Tip. I do use a K N filter so oil may have gotten on the MAF.The honeycomb screen before the MAF was very dirty. It looked clean until I started rubbing the q-tip on it and it was black and black power was falling from it.One strange coincidence is that, somehow, my brand new silverstar headlamp has burned out during all of this. Perhaps there is a short in the wires and that why the problem seems to have gone away when the bulb fried?Gonna haveta get a new bulb now and keep my fingers crossed. The idle/voltage problem existed long before I put the silverstars in.Anyone know if Schucks will give me a new one?It is less than a year old but I don’t have reciept.

Those stupid silverstar are expensive!***************2015 CC 3500 Duramax Sierra All Terrain 4×4 SLT inBlack2008 Yukon Denali inBlack***************

FigmomanValued Contributor Posts: 2935Loc: Wilton, CaliforniaReg: 11-01-03User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-08-05 04:02 PM-Post590579 In response tothealexdexterI burned out my first Silverstar after about a year. I had read where others have gotten a rather short life. I think the Silverstars burn a little hotter than stock to compensate for the slight blue tint that is on the lamp. It acts as a filter to make the light to appear brighter or a blue/white.

  1. Its not going to really give much more light unless wattage is increased and i think these are the same wattage as stock.
  2. I only use them on low beam though.
  3. 348 PG1972 K-10 short wide.
  4. 2008 Audi A4 2.0 turbo 6sp manual.
  5. the problem is still there.Any other thoughts on how to fix it or am I stuck with the dealer?***************2015 CC 3500 Duramax Sierra All Terrain 4×4 SLT inBlack2008 Yukon Denali inBlack
silvervortekSenior Member Posts: 732Loc:Georgia USA/ west coast I.

one hundred and thirty

thealexdexterMember Posts: 177Reg: 01-03-05User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-18-05 09:34 AM-Post590582 In response tosilvervortekPROBLEM SOLVED.The service guy says there were three things wrong.1.

the MAF sensor is dirty because of too much oil on my K N (i believe this.however I cleaned the MAF only two days before I took it in.)3.

this has made the truck run much better.more power.I cleaned that stupid thing only 35,000 miles ago.Why is gettting dirty so fast?!best of all.the new firmware has eliminated or significantly reduced my transmission problems.The clunks are nearly gone.

the 4-2 downshhift no longer feels like the tranny is gonna fall out.if your transmission clunks.i recommend a firmware upgrade.thanks for all your posts.***************2015 CC 3500 Duramax Sierra All Terrain 4×4 SLT inBlack2008 Yukon Denali inBlack***************

AnonymousUser InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-18-05 10:27 AM-Post590583 In response tothealexdexterWhen running a K NFilter or any oil type filter its best to clean the maf sensor atleast every 30000 miles. I plan on doing mine about every 20000 after reading all the post on this site with maf sensor causing problems, I kinda thought the maf sensor could be the culprit but it looks like you had a couple of issues causing the problem.

dukeofbluzSenior Member Posts: 883Loc: ILReg: 12-15-03User InfoSend Private TopicView Profile Re: Fluctuating idle/Fluctuating voltage01-28-05 09:31 AM-Post590584 In response toI guess its safe to say mine is working fine now too.

I opened the butterfly with the lever on the side and slid in my finger with the rag to clean the inside of the butterfly also.

Over 2 weeks NO PROBLEM!JeffreyMY YOUTUBE VIDEO!MY PICTURE TRAIL

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