Benefits of removing thermostat?

That’s because the thermostat creates a small restriction in the cooling system which allows the coolant to take on more heat. When you remove the thermostat, you remove that restriction and the coolant flows faster, taking on less heat and actually increasing the engine temperature.

quora.com

  • That’s because the thermostat creates a small restriction in the cooling system which allows the coolant to take on more heat. When you remove the thermostat, you remove that restriction and the coolant flows faster, taking on less heat and actually increasing the engine temperature.

Is removing the thermostat bad?

TOM: Yes, Lee, removing the thermostat does make the car run cooler. But you should never, ever do it. When the engine is too cool, the thermostat closes and stops the coolant from flowing through the radiator, so the engine heats back up.

Is it OK to run an engine without a thermostat?

Generally it should be ok to drive without the thermostat fitted, as it will only cause the engine to take longer to reach operating temperature. The thermostat is designed to allow the engine to reach ideal operating temperature as quickly as possible, so it would not be recommended to drive without it.

What happens when thermostat is removed?

It happens because driving without a thermostat tricks your engine into thinking it is cold outside, causing it to adjust the gas mixing valve and push more fuel to the engine. Keep a close eye on your gas gauge when driving without a thermostat, so you do not run out of gas. Your engine will use more fuel than normal.

What is the disadvantage of removing thermostat from a car?

Removing the thermostat will simply make the engine to over cool. That is bad. It will increase fuel consumption, as the engine CTS (coolant temperature sensor) will assume the engine’s not up to normal operating temperature, and simply inject more fuel in.

Can removing thermostat cause overheating?

If you remove the thermostat, your car will run cold in cold weather. In the summer. Your car will run between 190°F-200°F with or without a thermostat. Both will take longer to heat up to operating temperature.

What happens when thermostat is stuck open?

Thermostat stuck open: When the thermostat is stuck open, the engine temperature drops below normal when driving, especially on the highway in cold weather. A stuck-open thermostat can also cause lack of heat from the heating system. The Check Engine light may come on too.

Why is a thermostat important?

The thermostat is where it all begins with your home’s heating and cooling system. When you set it, the thermostat triggers, regulates and monitors the climate control process in your home and helps keep your family comfortable.

Can thermostat cause overheating?

Another common problem that can cause your engine to overheat is a thermostat in the cooling system that is stuck in the closed position. If the thermostat is closed, the coolant cannot circulate through the system properly and the engine will overheat.

Why do cars have thermostats?

Your car’s thermostat is a vital component that is actually pretty simple. It’s a valve located in your car’s cooling system. Its job is to regulate the amount of coolant that is recirculated back into the engine and how much is cooled via the radiator prior to being recirculated.

How does a thermostat valve affect the performance of the engine?

A thermostat is a valve that controls the engine’s temperature. The thermostat will stay closed if the engine is cold. This blocks the flow of coolant to the radiator allowing the engine to warm up quicker. This allows the coolant to enter the radiator, so it can prevent the car from overheating.

Does removing thermostat increase fuel consumption?

Removing the thermostat will simply make the engine to over cool. It will increase fuel consumption, as the engine CTS (coolant temperature sensor) will assume the engine’s not up to normal operating temperature, and simply inject more fuel in.

Is thermostat necessary in Africa?

Thermostat is important no matter where the ambient temperature is encountered. Jungles in Africia, deserts in Sahara or winter in Colorado. It regulate the wear and most of all efficiency and power of the engine.

Does thermostat affect fuel consumption?

If your car’s thermostat is stuck open, your engine will not be able to reach its optimum temperature. If this engine operating temperature level is not reached, your vehicle will have increased fuel consumption and exhaust emissions plus possibly less power.

Advantages and Disadvantages to Running without a Thermostat (4.9)

Advantages and Disadvantages to Running without a Thermostat (4.9)by Saber49
Started on : 11-18-2004 07:16 PM
Replies : 24
Last post by : RGBaker on 11-21-2004 10:44 AM
Saber49MemberPosts: 937 From: Ontario, Canada Registered: May 2004 ok so this is now the third thermostat ive gone through. im running a stock fiero thermostat on a 4.9. tonight it decided it would over heat and seize again. i am sick and tired of my car overheating.everything smells like coolant everywhere. now for a car thats only driven in the summer. is it OK to drive it without a thermostat. i need to know so i won’t have to go by another one of those things. oh and installing a fail safe is just about as good as no thermostat because its going to break regardless. so it will be stuck open running like it had no thermostat anyway. pluses for all who can help.Thanks!-IP: Logged
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86fieroEarlMemberPosts: 2203 From: Orlando, FL Registered: Jun 2002 Im not running one and my engine runs fine, It will take longer to reach operating temp tho. So your gas mileage might be worst.-IP: Logged
ED’s85GTMemberPosts: 1053 From: Statesville, NC. Registered: Feb 2002 My 4.9 runs fairly cool (cooler than the 2.8 ever did) without a thermostat it’ll overheat in the highway.A thermostat serves 2 functions,it regulates the coolant/engine temperature and acts as a flow restrictor when its open. (so that the water doesn’t flow too fast thru the radiator) I don’t know if you are running PFI or not, but if you are, you are going to have problems with the ecm. I was having trouble with the Fiero thermostat too, sometimes it would open and stay that way, when the temp went down my ecm would make the mixture richer thinking the motor was cold. after 2 Fiero thermostats (both doing the same thing) i installed a AutoZone brand 195degree thermostat For the Caddy motor. No more problems.EdIP: Logged
Saber49MemberPosts: 937 From: Ontario, Canada Registered: May 2004 Thanks for the responses guys! now ive run the highway with a stuck open thermostat once and it actually ran cooler then usual. i changed my coolant tonight and the results are as follows. when the thermostat is in it over heats and hits temps of up to 125 C. when its out it runs at normal operating temperature then the fan comes on and then once the fan does its job it shuts off. is this for the most part normal. oh and pluses for you bothThanks!IP: Logged
Master Tuner AkimotoMemberPosts: 2267 From: South Florida,USA Registered: Jul 2003 I use restrictors rings in my car and I have no problems with thatunless you are in a cold winter situationyou bshould be able to run with a restrictor,take out the thermostat and clip off thepiece that holds the float and toss it just leaving the hole where it came from in this way it will slow down the water flowgoing through the system enoughto keep your engine cool.IP: Logged
Dragon1MemberPosts: 888 From: Racine,Wisconsin Registered: Sep 2002 I’m running a caddy 195 degree thermostat but I drilled a 1/8″ hole to bypass some coolant. No overheating, no problems with closed loop or anything.Dragon1/BrianIP: Logged
4BanGinFunMemberPosts: 1321 From:keswick Ontario Canada Registered: Oct 2001 my 2.5 didnt have a thermostat in it for a whole summer it ran nice and cool didnt have any driveabily problems. just once the fall rolled around it took it a little longer to warm up,but if it reaches it normal opt temp then there shouldnt be any problems-Chris 85 Fiero SE 2.5L of furysecond one in the garage undergoing surgerySee the progress pageIP: Logged
SnowcrashMemberPosts: 411 From: Sugar Land, TX Registered: Oct 2004
KohburnMemberPosts: 7349 From: Oriental, NC Registered: Jul 2003 I’d recommend just changing to a non fiero thermostat -heck in the fiero 2.8 i’ve removed the little handle from a fiero stat and use it to hold a non fiero stat into place.worked great and was a lot more reliableIP: Logged
Saber49MemberPosts: 937 From: Ontario, Canada Registered: May 2004 Thanks for all the reply’s guys. i appreciate the advice. ive also found a small leak beetween the coolant line that runs from the thermostat at the engine to the coolant tube. would radiator stop leak work or do i need to flush the whole thing and put a new hose in?IP: Logged
KohburnMemberPosts: 7349 From: Oriental, NC Registered: Jul 2003 i would NEVER use stopleak in a coolant system unless it was a junk with pinholes int eh radiator and it only needed to last me a few weeksIP: Logged
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ScytheMemberPosts: 1055 From: Burke, Virginia Registered: Apr 2003 DON’T USE STOP LEAK.I’d only use it on a junker to get me past a week before I trash it.That stuff is horrible for your car.IP: Logged
PBJMemberPosts: 4167 From: London, On., Canada Registered: Jan 2001
quote
Originally posted by Scythe:DON’T USE STOP LEAK.I’d only use it on a junker to get me past a week before I trash it.That stuff is horrible for your car.
GM service manual cut and paste for cadiliacFailure to use the engine coolant supplement (sealant) and the approved coolant antifreeze could result in major engine damage. When refilling the cooling system, add three pellets of the engine coolant supplement sealant GM P/N 3634621 to the lower radiator hose. IP: Logged
Saber49MemberPosts: 937 From: Ontario, Canada Registered: May 2004 good call pete! but now where do i get the good stuff. is it diffrent from the stuff canadian tire carries?IP: Logged
PBJMemberPosts: 4167 From: London, On., Canada Registered: Jan 2001
quote
Originally posted by Saber49:now where do i get the good stuff. is it diffrent from the stuff canadian tire carries?
I know the GM stuff is in solid form and needs to be broken up, I don’t know if its the same as the premixed liquid stuff at CTC.I can tell you the GM stuff is$5.00 at the GM dealer. Sorry, not much more help.Pete IP: Logged
Saber49MemberPosts: 937 From: Ontario, Canada Registered: May 2004 thats ok pete. ill make a few calls and see whats around. ill try to get the offical stuff if possibleThanks!IP: Logged
RGBakerMemberPosts: 112 From: Ottawa, ON Canada Registered: Jun 2004 The myth that coolant flowing ‘too fast’ doesn’t have ‘time’ to cool fails the basic physics test.It seems to be a popular myth, but it is neither possible, nor the experience of those that run without a thermostat.If the water is flowing ‘too quickly’ it only means it will be back sooner – the total ‘time’ the water spends in the radiator will be the same, as the system is a closed loop.And the physics that determines how much heat gets dissipated works back at the accumulation end too. the net effect is exactly the same.A thermostat closes so that the coolant gets up to temperature in the block – as soon as it is too hot it lets some out until the target temperature returns. and that is a ‘good thing’, as proper operating temperature is what the engine is designed for.I see no advantage to running an engine ‘too cool’, though there is a disadvantage to running one too hot. but the engine that runs too hot won’t be ‘fixed’ by removing the thermostat, assuming it was a working thermostat, as the same physics governs the heat dissipation, thermostat or no.Cheers, GBIP: Logged
rockcrawlMemberPosts: 2528 From: Lehigh Valley, PA Registered: Jul 2000 GB,I don’t understand your explaination of coolant flow.
quote
If the water is flowing ‘too quickly’ it only means it will be back sooner – the total ‘time’ the water spends in the radiator will be the same, as the system is a closed loop.
If the water is leaving the engine faster and gets back to the engine sooner, how could it not spend less time in the radiator?JonIP: Logged
linenoiseMemberPosts: 3789 From:Registered: Jun 2003
quote
Originally posted by PBJ:GM service manual cut and paste for cadiliacFailure to use the engine coolant supplement (sealant) and the approved coolant antifreeze could result in major engine damage. When refilling the cooling system, add three pellets of the engine coolant supplement sealant GM P/N 3634621 to the lower radiator hose.
Damn Pete you beat me to posting this. It’s about the only thing I have learned so far and now you neat me to the punch. IP: Logged
RGBakerMemberPosts: 112 From: Ottawa, ON Canada Registered: Jun 2004 Because if it leaves sooner, it will be back sooner. and the total time spent in the radiator is the same.Think of it as rpms – if the coolant is ‘rotating’ at one rpm, then one degree of arc of the coolant spends 1/360 of a minute at TDC for every minute.If the rpm is increased to 100 rpm, then one degree of arc still spends 1/360 of its time at TDC – it gets there faster, gets out sooner but it all adds up to the same total per minute.In truth, the laws of thermodynamics that matter here are related to mass – the heat is transferred from the block to the coolant (which I refer to casually as water), and the temperature rise of the water is determined by the mass of water.If the water is circulating adequately, you calculate the cooling capacity based on the total mass of water factored by the surface area of the radiator, which is nothing more magic than another heat exchange, this time from the closed loop (and fixed mass) coolant system to an infinite loop (and so infinite mass) air.The air mass is infinite only in that is not a closed loop – the limitations of what mass of air can be moved across the surface area of the rad are governed by air flow and rad size. but no where in this equation is ‘time’ of the closed loop coolant system a factor.Now the reverse could be a problem – the water in the block gets very hot, hotter than it would be if it could get exposed to the surface area of the rad. but because the circulating pump doesn’t move it fast enough the block reaches the limit of possible heat exchange to the water before the water is replaced with water that is below the maximum.But this is because the water runs out of the ability to absorb the heat.As long as the pump can move the water away from the heat source before it is at maximum, the system continues to function.There is no disadvantage – beyond some impossible system where the pump itself was so incredibly powerful that the pumping force added more heat to the water than the block did. but such a pump would have to be powered by something other than the engine, or it would become itself an energy ‘source’ instead of an energy consumer.HTHGB IP: Logged
rogergarrisonMemberPosts: 49601 From: A Western Caribbean Island/Columbus, Ohio Registered: Apr 99 So to speak, no thermostat in itself is not a big problem. It does restrict the flow to aid in cooling but not by making it slow down. It forces the water into passages that would not flow much if the rest was freeflowing. This will happen because not all openings for the water to flow are the same size. Some may be an inch or so, others may be 1/8″ and the water will naturally try to follow the path of least resistance (bigger holes). Your gauge may indicate coolent temp is lower, because its measured at the sending unit. But there may be real hot spots in the water jacket that you will never know about untill that part fails by cracking or breaking. I will never run without some kind of restriction or thermostat except in a total emergency.IP: Logged
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RGBakerMemberPosts: 112 From: Ottawa, ON Canada Registered: Jun 2004 Well, I’m not sure that the flow down restricted passages is affected so much by the thermostat as by the pressure inherent in the system itself.Most of the time, thermostats are either ‘open’, so have no effect on circulation at all, or closed – in which case the circulation is entirely within the blockthe cockpit heating system.The real job of the thermostat is ensure that the block gets as quickly as feasible to the operating temperature, at which point the thermostat opensin short order the entire ‘cooling’ system gets up to the operating temperature – in the extremes of my winter driving, the thermostat might close again at highway speeds, as the ambient might be hovering around -20 and the cooling system becomes too efficient, but the thermostat closes the loop to a smaller capacity and the operating temperature stays where it was designed.I am only speculating, but I’d guess that at 50 degrees F and warmer once the thermostat opens it likely stays open.Maybe there is a little oscillating at temperatures down to 20 or soat the extremes of cold there is enough direct from block to ambient exchange the the thermostat might stay closed almost indefinitely.If everything is working, a thermostat is a good thing – but there is no way that the absence of a thermostat can lead to _more_ heat.GBIP: Logged
Saber49MemberPosts: 937 From: Ontario, Canada Registered: May 2004 Wow thanks for the uh. science lesson guys. that should help. now im sorta worried that coolant isn’t getting everywhere like roger said. maybe ill just run with one. i don’t know im gonna see how it runs with and without one and see which is the best course of action.Thanks to all who have helped!IP: Logged
jscott1MemberPosts: 21676 From: Houston, TX, USA Registered: Dec 2001
quote
Originally posted by RGBaker:Because if it leaves sooner, it will be back sooner. and the total time spent in the radiator is the same.
RGBaker, you left out one important part of the equation, the efficiency of the radiator is affected by the materials that is constructed, air flow across it and mass flow of the coolant in mass/time so yes time is in the equation.At higher flow rates it’s true that the delta T will be lower.the fluid will have less time to transfer heat and the temperature change will be lower.However you will move a larger quantity of heat.Everything else being equal flow is more important than delta T anyway.Back when I used to work at the Kennedy Space Center we had the ground coolant hooked up to the shuttle before liftoff.We would get the system as cold as we could but when the orbiter started powering up for launch we would increase flow rather than attempt to lower the temp.With higher flow you can get the heat back to the heat exhanger more quickly.IP: Logged
RGBakerMemberPosts: 112 From: Ottawa, ON Canada Registered: Jun 2004 It would be incorrect to suggest that time has no place in the equation – but the important fact here is that there is no circumstance where speed through a radiator reduces the efficiency – if the thermal capacity of the coolant is not exceeded, cooling will always take place; if the thermal capacity of the coolant is exceeded, the ‘problem’ will occur at both the increasingdecreasing stages and so be a non-factor.Cheers, GBIP: Logged

Drive A Car Without a Thermostat: All You Need to Know

You could have been debating whether or not it was safe to drive without a thermostat in your vehicle. When the engine gets hot, the thermostat has an incredible feature that allows it to keep the engine cool. As a result, driving a car without a thermostat has its own set of dangers that every motorist should be aware of. Let’s find out what will happen next! Take a look at the automobile thermostats to get a better understanding of the subject “is it okay to remove the thermostat from my car?”

What are Car Thermostats?

To put it another way, the thermostat is that little mechanism that lies between the radiator and the engine of a liquid-cooled vehicle. The thermostat in most automobiles has a diameter of around 2 inches (5 cm) and serves a crucial function in the vehicle, namely, regulating the flow of engine coolant from the engine to the cooling system. It prevents coolant from flowing into the radiator, which can result in a quick increase in engine temperature if the valve is closed. The engine coolant goes into the radiator, where it distributes heat and cools the now-hot coolant when the radiator valve is opened at around 200 degrees F.

As previously said, the operating concept of a car thermostat is really basic, despite the fact that it is a significant component of a vehicle.

A single one can be placed in a saucepan of boiling water on the stovetop.

Alternatively, you may go to a vehicle parts store and buy a few of dollars’ worth of components to experiment with.

What You Need to Know When Running a Car with no Thermostat?

Running a car without a thermostat is not a good idea since it may lead to a variety of negative repercussions. In addition, if the thermostat is not functioning properly, the overall performance of the vehicle is compromised:

1. The Coolant

A car that is not equipped with a thermostat is not a good idea since it may result in a variety of negative repercussions. Apart from that, if the thermostat is disconnected, the overall performance of the vehicle suffers:

2. Engine Parts

It is critical for drivers to warm up their engines before starting them since starting a cold engine causes parts to wear out faster. Because the defective components are not isolated from the oil, the engine’s life is reduced rapidly. It is necessary for the engine to go through the closed loop operation after it has reached a certain temperature. If the temperature doesn’t rise, the engine will choke and eventually shut down completely. In reality, the heater will also be responsible for the production of chilly air.

Two-fold, there is a possibility that the water will flow through the radiator at such a rapid pace that it will not remain in the radiator long enough to cool down, resulting in your engine being overheated. MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT:

  • The reason why the engine becomes sluggish every time it is accelerated
  • The best way to switch off a car engine that won’t turn off

However, depending on the age of the vehicle, driving a vehicle without a thermostat might result in increased fuel consumption since the ECM (engine control module) would believe that the engine is still in its cold condition and will need to be started. According to real-time data from the intake, combustion chamber, exhaust, and catalytic converters, the ECU fine-tunes the performance parameters of the vehicle. All of the sensors must operate within a predetermined range in order for the ECU to be able to manage the fuel/air mixture, timing, shift point, and other parameters.

Some of the required temperatures are not attained if you drive your car without using a thermostat, which forces the ECU to balance the emissions on a “cold engine” all of the time, even when the car has been running for the whole day.

3. Thermostat Replacement

A faulty thermostat has the potential to cause catastrophic damage to the car. The frequent replacement of the thermostat will assist you in keeping the whole operation of the vehicle in good functioning order. The engine will attain its ideal operating temperature, and the entire system will operate as intended. As a result, removing the thermostat from your automobile and its components is detrimental to them in every manner conceivable. Here’s where to find an inexpensive secondhand automobile in decent condition.

Solution for the Lack of Heat

Placing a large piece of cardboard in front of the radiator might help to alleviate a lack of heat. It has to be situated somewhere between the automobile grill and the radiator to be effective. By decreasing the amount of cold air that is being blown, this strategy prevents the radiator from cooling the entire system. It could even be able to alleviate the problem with the heater blowing chilly air. However, while continuing this strategy, keep a check on the temperature gauge to ensure that the engine does not overheat and fail.

As a result, if you wonder whether a car can run without a thermostat, use this approach.

How to Drive A Car Without A Thermostat

Even though it is never a good idea to drive a car without a thermostat, what if you have no choice? Is there a safe method for me to assist you? The following is the procedure for operating a vehicle without a thermostat. If you drive without a thermostat, your engine will never achieve its optimum working temperature, and your heater may blast cold air since it will never reach its ideal operating temperature. For those of us who live in warm climates, this should not be an issue. You may thus lay a huge piece of cardboard in front of the radiator and between the radiator and the car’s grill if your automobile isn’t getting enough heat during cold weather.

Remember to keep an eye on your temperature gauge when you’re utilizing the cardboard approach to make sure that your automobile engine doesn’t overheat.

Do not be alarmed if you notice a drop in gas mileage or performance; this is normal.

When driving without a thermostat, keep a constant check on your gas gauge to ensure that you do not run out of petrol too soon.

Your engine will consume significantly more gasoline than usual. Driving your car as usual and swiftly locating a professional to replace your auto thermostat as soon as feasible are two of the most important things you can do. Every second you spend waiting will have major effects for your vehicle.

Wrap Up

Running a car without a thermostat is a terrible idea in general and should be avoided. In any circumstance when you are unclear about the state of your thermostat, follow the best maintenance advice or simply get expert assistance as soon as possible. If you have any questions or need clarification on anything, please leave a comment below and we will get back to you as soon as possible!

You should never, ever remove the thermostat.

Greetings, Tom and Ray: Several people have voiced conflicting opinions to me on whether removing the thermostat from an automobile makes it run cooler in the summer. Is that correct? Lee TOM: Yes, Lee, it is true that removing the thermostat causes the car to run colder. However, you should never, ever engage in such behavior. RAY: Everyone is aware that running an automobile at excessive temperatures is not a good idea. However, you may not be aware that running a car at too low a temperature is detrimental to its performance.

  • Its primary function is to maintain the engine’s operating temperature at a safe level.
  • In order to prevent the engine from being too chilly, the thermostat closes and prevents coolant from flowing through the radiator, causing the engine to heat up again.
  • RAY: However, rather of addressing the issue, this just served to mask it.
  • It temporarily alleviates the discomfort, but it does not resolve the condition.
  • The majority of modern automobiles are equipped with computers that continually monitor the engine temperature and alter the vehicle accordingly.
  • This will result in poor gas mileage, carbon buildup, and, eventually, a $400 repair charge for a new catalytic converter replacement.
  • You don’t want it to become too hot, but you do want it to stay cool long enough for one final excursion.
  • Summer, thermostats, recent stories, archives, and tag browsing are all available.

How to Drive Cars Without a Thermostat

Image courtesy of terex from Fotolia.com of an engine with air cooling. It is located on the engine of a car and controls the engine temperature by opening to enable coolant from the radiator to circulate into the engine and cool it down before shutting again to allow the engine to reheat up to operating temperature. As you drive, this cycle repeats itself, ensuring that your engine is operating at the appropriate temperature for driving. The vast majority of vehicle technicians will advise you that driving your car without a thermostat fitted is not a smart idea.

However, if your thermostat becomes locked in the closed position, it will cause your engine to overheat, making it difficult to drive your car. If you find yourself in this situation and have no choice but to drive without a thermostat, it is possible to do so.

Driving without a thermostat

The primary function of an automobile’s thermostat is to maintain a constant operating temperature in the engine’s operating chamber. When you switch on the heater in your automobile, the heat generated by the engine heats the interior of the vehicle. As a result, if you drive without a thermostat, your engine will never achieve its ideal working temperature, and your heater may blast cold air as a result. For those of us who live in warm climates, this should not be an issue.

Step 2

You may solve the problem of inadequate heat inside your automobile by placing a huge piece of cardboard in front of the radiator, between the radiator and the car’s grille, as shown in the illustration. This will prevent cold air from flowing over your radiator and cooling your automobile more more than it already is. This may assist you in getting some heat from the heater in your automobile.

Step 3

If you are experiencing a lack of heat in your vehicle, one option is to lay a huge piece of cardboard in front of the radiator, between the radiator and your vehicle’s grill. This will prevent cold air from flowing over your radiator and cooling your automobile even more than it is already cooling. In order to obtain any heat from your car’s heater, you may need to do the following:

Step 4

You may expect your engine to overheat if you don’t have a thermostat installed, yet the reverse is true. A automobile without a thermostat would never be able to reach operating temperature, much alone become dangerously overheated. In the absence of a thermostat, the engine would have a steady flow of coolant through it, which would result in a constant cooling effect on the engine. If the thermostat was in place and became stuck in the closed position, the engine would overheat since no coolant would be able to enter the engine, resulting in the thermostat being removed.

You should get your thermostat changed as soon as possible after arriving at your location by a qualified repair.

ReferencesTips

  • Remember to keep an eye on your temperature gauge when you’re utilizing the cardboard approach to make sure that your automobile engine doesn’t overheat. Whenever the temperature gauge begins to rise above a certain point, just stop and remove the cardboard.

Several Items You’ll NeedWarnings

  • When driving without a thermostat, keep a constant check on your gas gauge to ensure that you do not run out of petrol too soon. Your engine will consume significantly more gasoline than usual.

Biography of the Author Since 1995, Jessica Hughey has worked as a freelance writer for several publications. She holds Microsoft Word and Excel certifications, and she has experience working as a technical support representative for a large software publisher. HUGHE keeps a few personal blogs up to date, and her writing has featured in a number of other online outlets. She went to Cleary University in Ann Arbor, Michigan, for her undergraduate studies.

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Biographical Information about the Author. She has been a freelance writer since 1995 and currently lives in New Hampshire. Microsoft Word and Excel are among her certifications, and she has experience working as a technical support representative for a large software publisher.

HUGHE keeps a few personal blogs up to date, and her writing has featured in a number of on-line venues. Ann Arbor, Michigan’s Cleary University was where she went to school.

  1. Maintain a level parking space and use the emergency brake in your vehicle
  2. Wait until the morning or a few hours after you’ve driven before you do anything. After your vehicle has had some time to cool down, open the hood. Look for the thermostat
  3. Remove the radiator cap and set it aside.

The effects if you remove thermostat from car

When an engine overheats problem develops, many people propose removing the engine thermostat from the cooling system, especially if the thermostat is not in a damaged state during the examination. The engine thermostat is critical in regulating the circulation and temperature of the radiator coolant, which is required by the engine for proper operation. Removal of the engine’s thermostat from the cooling system may result in the cooling system of the engine functioning improperly. The engine thermostat regulates the temporal flow of the radiator coolant in response to the temperature of the radiator coolant.

  • The coolant then flows exclusively through the by-pass line, which is directly linked to the water pump, and does not enter the engine.
  • The thermostat valve, which shuts the channel to the radiator, will expedite the heat process of the engine’s operating temperature, resulting in a faster and more ready-to-use engine when the engine is turned on.
  • In heated conditions, the thermostat valve leading to the radiator opens and closes the bypass channel, allowing coolant to bypass the engine.
  • Take a look at the illustration below.
  • Read about how the radiator works when it comes to lowering the temperature of the cooling water in this article.
  • When coolant is swapped from the radiator to the engine and vice versa, it can help to keep the engine operating at its proper temperature.
  • Take a look at the illustration below.
  • It will have an effect on the overall performance of the engine.

1. Engine shakes

The first impact that happens when the engine thermostat is removed from the cooling system is that the engine rattles, indicating that it is difficult to attain the engine’s normal working temperature. This condition will be experienced when the coolant temperature is still at a low temperature. In order to prevent excessive coolant flow to the radiator while the engine temperature is low, the engine thermostat valve should be closed. If the engine thermostat is removed, the coolant will continue to flow (due to the fact that it is being pushed by the water pump), making it harder to attain the engine’s operating temperature.

Because of the difficulties in reaching the operating temperature of the engine, an imbalance in the fuel supply that enters the engine cylinder will develop. There will be a greater amount of vibration in the engine, which will cause the engine to tremble in response.

2. Engine knocking

When the engine thermostat is removed from the cooling system, the next effect that will manifest itself is the emergence of banging in the engine’s operation. It is common for the appearance of knocking to occur when the engine temperature has exceeded normal limits but has not yet reached the overheating phase, which can cause the engine to stall. Knocking will occur as a result of the compressed fuel inside the engine exploding before being ignited by the ignition spark plug. This occurrence occurs as a result of an increase in engine temperature, which has surpassed the engine’s normal operating temperature limit.

  • The emergence of banging on the engine will be the next impact that will occur when the engine thermostat is removed from the cooling system. It is common for the appearance of knocking to occur when the engine temperature has exceeded normal limits but has not yet reached the overheating phase, which can cause the engine to stall. Knocking will occur as a result of the compressed fuel inside the engine exploding before being ignited by the ignition system. In this case, the engine temperature has reached a level that exceeds the engine’s normal working temperature limit. Also see: Engine Temperature.

3. Overheat in the traffic jam

The removal of the engine thermostat from the cooling system will increase the likelihood of the automobile engine overheating. Because of the high temperature of the engine coolant while the automobile is stalled in traffic, it will be difficult to cool the engine. This occurs as a result of the coolant continuing to flow and not stopping at the radiator. When combined with a traffic congestion condition, the car’s radiator receives less cool air than it would otherwise get. The result is that the engine knocks more frequently, overheats more quickly, and eventually stalls due to overheating.

4. Fuel consumption becomes more wasteful

Because the engine thermostat was not placed in the engine cooling system, the final impact that was felt was increased fuel consumption, which resulted in a more wasteful driving experience. In fact, this issue is caused by the cooling system’s inability to maintain the appropriate engine working temperature throughout operation. In some cases, such as while the engine is still cold, the engine will take extra gasoline to attain the optimal operating temperature. Fuel becomes wasted as a result of this.

When the engine knocking occurs, the EFI system fails and enters failsafe mode, causing the engine to shut down.

Yes, the removal of the thermostat from the engine cooling system will result in at least four of the impacts stated above being experienced.

hmm Thermostat removal. benefit?

When I purchased my miata, it did not have a thermostat; the only difference was that it took longer to warm up because the coolant was constantly flowing. As for the previous comment about it not allowing the coolant to remain in the radiator, I’m not sure if you are aware that the coolant simply flows through the radiator and back into the motor upon contact with the ground. Regardless of whether or not there is a thermostat, there is no valve at the bottom of the radiator that retains the water INSIDE the radiator until it is cold, after which it cycles through the motor.

I’d never heard of it before, and I don’t understand how you could get any type of advantage by having it continually streaming in as opposed to not having it at all.

Don’t just take out individual components.

Removing thermostat – pro’s and con’s [Archive]

View the full version of this article: The advantages and disadvantages of removing the thermostat tekung8907-08-2008, 03:06 PM07-08-2008, 03:06 PM So the automobile I recently purchased appeared a bit strange since it took around 10 minutes or perhaps longer to reach 4037 degrees Fahrenheit on the temperature sensor (which is jus touching the temp symbol on a dc2). When I open the radiator cap, it appears like the water is always gushing out. I noticed the temperature gauge rising from 40 percent to 50 percent and then dropping back to 40 percent after a few minutes of aggressive driving at 4-6k rpm.

Driving regularly, on the other hand, is perfectly fine and causes me no issues at all.

After doing some research, I discovered that if the thermostat is removed, a car might possibly overheat since there is a steady flow of water at a quicker rate, and at high rpm, the water does not spend enough time in the radiator to be cooled down, resulting in overheating.

The removal of the thermostat can also cause the car to enter cold start mode since it is unable to achieve operational temperatures.

This increases the wear on the engine and may cause the fuel to be used up a little faster.

Is there anything more that folks would like to contribute to the discussion?

Would you guys propose a low opening thermostat or just the stock one?

EST Yes, I can confirm that I experienced the identical issues with my prior vehicle after removing the thermostat on the advice of a buddy who believed it would provide better cooling.

The engine temperature drops to dangerously low levels at night and during extended rides.

I believe the thermostate also functions as a pressure valve, ensuring that the pressure inside the cooling system is maintained and that the system does not overflow.

I then replaced it with a new OEM one, which resolved all of my issues.

EST If I were to buy something for track, it would be a baffled sumpoil cooler.

The time now is 10:51 a.m.

tekung89 Yes, I can confirm that I experienced the identical issues with my prior vehicle after removing the thermostat on the advice of a buddy who believed it would provide better cooling.

The engine temperature drops to dangerously low levels at night and during extended rides.

I believe the thermostate also functions as a pressure valve, ensuring that the pressure inside the cooling system is maintained and that the system does not overflow.

I then replaced it with a new OEM one, which resolved all of my issues.

I was thinking that the waterpump could be on its way out, but I’ll probably start with replacing the thermostat first before moving on to any other options.

advantages of not having a thermometer running 1) The engine does not reach operating temperature (increased weartear) 2) If the engine does not reach operating temperature, the ECU may remain in cold start mode, increasing fuel usage.

Without a thermostat, and if you don’t close off the coolant bypass, it’s possible that the coolant won’t get into the radiator, causing you to overheat.

I was wondering if it was simple to replace the thermostat.

Simply said, don’t do that.

Do you have any thoughts on the ‘coolant by-pass alteration’ that has been done to the throttle body?

I experienced issues with all of the sensors on the TB and ended up changing them one by one, with each replacement, the car’s performance improving.

My automobile currently has 100,000 kilometers on the odometer.

Chr1s23-08-2008 12:21 p.m.

Don’t take your thermostat out of the wall.

Don’t take your thermostat out of the wall.

I did this and kept it like this for two years, and I can’t say that I observed any change in the outcome.

I’m wondering whether this modification may have contributed to the heating issues in the TB.

When I completed the modification, it had 60,000.

Consider the following scenario: you’re driving down the highway and your TB sticks open when you lift your foot off the pedal.

However, I have never had any issues in Queensland.

It was such a simple and quick job, and it killed two birds with one stone.

Thank you so much, Deano!

prevent it from being too hot?

Do you believe that the coolant will help to manage the temperature in the TB, i.e.

No, it’s a steady flow that won’t be regulated at all.

beeza23-08-2008, 02:17 PM23-08-2008, 02:17 PM Sorry I mean, do you believe that allowing the coolant to travel through there will help to keep the TB cooler?

DLO0123-08-2008, 02:22 p.m.

When coolant is fed through the TB, the temperature of the TB rises (80-90 degrees).

It is possible to remove the coolant from the TB.

Is this what you’re referring to?

That’s really helpful to know.

ef-civic23-08-2008, 04:58 PM ef-civic23-08-2008, 04:58 PM As a result, I drove my automobile without a thermostat.

08-08-2008, 05:04 PM (DLO0123) Yes, you absolutely should.: thumbsup: JohnL23-08-2008, 08:03 PM23-08-2008, 08:03 PM 2) Yes, coolant was leaking from the overflow, and it continued to do so.

Because the thermostat only closes the system at one location, the pressure inside the cooling system is always equal everywhere (with the exception of a minute differential on one side of the pump compared to the other side of the pump).

It won’t make a difference whether you have a thermostat installed or not (to pressure in one part of the system vs another).

JohnL23-08-2008, 8:14 p.m.

With an EFI engine, I believe it is unlikely to be a good idea, unless you were certain that the engine was operating at a high enough temperature to be outside of the cold running open loop map.

I believe my eg with B18CR has a spoon thermostat, but I might be wrong.

If the traffic slows down, the temperature rises into the 70s or 80s.

My other vehicles are constantly running in the 80s.

When driving regularly in free-flowing traffic, the engine temperature is between 66 and 69 degrees.

I’m not sure if the upper 60s are too chilly.

Yes, 69 degrees is too chilly.

The temperature should be between 80 and 90 degrees.

I believe I will need to adjust my thermostat.

on September 6, 2008, and the date is DLO0106-09-2008.

After the engine, the water temperature should be between 80 and 90 degrees.

where is the sensor located?

I’d recommend just enhanced applications in general, and one in particular With an EFI engine, I believe it is unlikely to be a good idea, unless you were certain that the engine was operating at a high enough temperature to be outside of the cold running open loop map.

I’m not sure what Spoon is, but I assumed they were something along the lines of Mugen thermostats/switches.

Where are you getting your temperature from, i.e.

I’m getting it from the reading on the Power FC hand controller for the water temperature.

I have an EK9 radiator with a B18CR fan in it.

fatboyz3906-09-2008, 10:37 PM06-09-2008, 10:37 PM I’m getting it from the reading on the Power FC hand controller for the water temperature.

I have an EK9 radiator with a B18CR fan in it.

Yes, the thermostat and fan switch are both stock:thumbsup:.

On September 9, 2008, at 10:47 p.m., dsp2606-09-2008 ^^^ Yes, I have finally removed mine.

If you’re looking for Triton OEM replacement parts, Supercheap sells them for roughly $20 and they come in three different sizes: 87*, 90*, and 92*.

Actually, it ‘feels’ better, and my car heats up faster as a result.

Just look at the component number; it will finish with one of those two numbers for their complete line of thermoses.

There are new ones for $35-$45.

Even for applications that have been worked on:) Spend your money on something modest that will endure for a few solid years rather than anything flashy.

A few months ago, I was involved in an accident, and I recently received it back from a panel beater who had only repaired the panels and put a new radiator.

I’ve changed everything, but I’m stumped as to why the radiator fan is still not functioning.

I’m planning to adjust the thermostat tomorrow, but I’m not sure whether it will be enough to solve the issue.

The radiator is operational; however, I have not attempted to switch on the air conditioning yet since I may need to re-gas it first.

As well as the fuse, I double-checked all of the cables, which appear to be properly attached.

Isn’t it true that the radiator fan isn’t working?

Alternatively, try turning on the air conditioning.

If the radiator fan does not turn off, it is likely that the fan is broken.

KLA80T14-09-2008, 03:46 a.m.

The fact that I recently purchased them makes me believe it’s not the fan.

(Can you describe how it appears?) I believe I also tried turning on the air conditioning, but both fans were still not functioning.

will confirm whether or not the thermostat and switch are compatible. I have a sneaking suspicion that it may be wiring. Thank you so much, guy! This site is powered by vBulletin® 4.2.2. Copyright vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2022 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All intellectual property rights are retained.

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