Brake caliper slide pin? (Correct answer)

  • If you remove the wheel and look at the brakes, the caliper bolts into the slide pins. The slide pins are behind the rubber boots. Typically, you lube the slide pins when you do the brakes. Sorry, no pics at the moment but if you remove one of the front wheels it will make sense. You have to pull/unbolt the caliper to see them.

What do brake caliper slide pins do?

You may be wondering what brake calipers are! Brake calipers house the brake pads and, using brackets, pistons and caliper slide pins, help push the pads into the brake rotors when you apply the brakes. Over time, the slide pins lose their lubrication and don’t slide the calipers so well.

How do I know if my caliper slide pin is bad?

Here’s how you can tell if your brake caliper has gone bad:

  1. Pulling to one side. A seized brake caliper or caliper sliders can cause the vehicle to pull to one side or the other while braking.
  2. Fluid leaks.
  3. Spongy or soft brake pedal.
  4. Reduced braking ability.
  5. Uneven brake pad wear.
  6. Dragging sensation.
  7. Abnormal noise.

What is a brake slider pin?

The floating section is bolted to two pins called slide pins (lavender color in the picture). These pins are greased and allow for proper alignment of the caliper to the brake rotor and still allow for the movement needed under normal driving.

How often should you grease caliper pins?

Now the thing here is that you should be checking your brakes and lubricating all this stuff about every 12-15 thousand miles or once a year. But, the product you use has to be designed specifically for brakes because of the excessive heat, you can’t use normal grease because normal grease will melt and go away.

How tight should caliper pins be?

Snug is fine. Caliper bolts are loaded in SHEAR, which means a force they experience is trying to cut them off as if they were being decapitated. The tightness of the bolt IS important, but not as important as the strength of the bolt to resist the shear forces.

Caliper Slide Pin Boot – What is it? • Motor Works, Inc.

With this component, we played a game of “What’s That Wednesday” – it turns out to be a brake caliper sliding pin boot! We had such a positive response to our “What’s That Wednesday” social media post that we decided to elaborate a little more on it. The “mystery part” that we displayed was a brake caliper sliding pin boot, which you can see below. But, exactly, what is this thing? Disc brakes are now standard equipment on all automobiles. The most important components are referred to as brake pads, calipers, rotors, and discs.

The braking rotor is secured to the wheel via bolts.

This is made up of two basic elements.

The caliper body (seen in yellow in these photographs), which must be able to “float” in order to allow for both the application of both brake pads and the ability to release the brakes when the traffic signal changes to green.

  1. These pins are lubricated, and they enable for perfect alignment of the brake caliper to the brake rotor while also allowing for the mobility required under typical driving conditions.
  2. When the pin boots are no longer effective in keeping out the harmful material, the pins might seize.
  3. The heat buildup that occurs as a result of the brake dragging is likely to cause brake pad wear and rotor warpage very quickly.
  4. When we service your vehicle, they are checked as part of a comprehensive brake examination performed by a professional.
  5. — Greg & Co.

How to Test Brake Caliper Guide Pins

In the event that you are experiencing braking problems, the guide pins might be the source of your problems; however, only a thorough check can reveal the truth. A large portion of the process when changing your brake pads on your own will be removing the guide pins from the calipers. But what happens if you don’t put the pins back in the right place? Then you could hear strange noises or have difficulty stopping. Driving with your brakes stuck or grabbing is a bad idea, and you may also hear a grinding noise from the calipers since they aren’t contacting the rotor at the right angle.

  1. You’ll need to examine the brakes as though you’re preparing to replace the pads, which will take some time.
  2. Elevate the vehicle, remove the tires, and disassemble the brake caliper to inspect the caliper housing.
  3. They’re there for a reason.
  4. The majority of automobiles are equipped with two guiding pins, each of which is protected by a rubber casing.
  5. Additionally, the pins may be caught in the rotor or they may not fully engage with the rotor once the pads have been changed.
  6. Tools for removing caliper pins may also be purchased at auto parts retailers.

If this is the case, you may be faced with a difficult situation. Such means you’ll need to talk about your alternatives with an expert auto repair in that scenario. After that, we’ll talk about how to re-insert the guide pins in the right manner.

How To Deal With “caliper pin stuck”?

“Caliper pin stuck” isn’t exactly a term that comes to mind when you think of it, but thanks to Google, it’s most likely the reason you’re reading this. Over 30,000 searches for that phrase and related terms, such as “stuck brake caliper pin,” were made on Google last year. So a stuck caliper pin, as well as its nefarious twin, a seized caliper pin, are problems that many people have to deal with. The difficulties might arise as a result of recycling outdated brake parts or using the incorrect brake oil during brake repairs.

THE SIGN

While travelling north on Highway 101 in California, half-listening to Dr. Dean Edell on the radio, I fell asleep. It was a long time ago, but I remember it well. I worried when I realized I was driving at full speed on the gravel shoulder. I wrenched the steering wheel to the left a few times. My automobile slid into the highway, crossed both lanes, and slid into the center of the highway median. But I made a mistake and went the other way, turning back across the highway and into a grass field, headed directly towards a massive highway sign that read: VANDENBERG AFB ON THE REVERSE.

As it came to a complete halt, it began to gently turn over and lean upside down against the sign, which was illuminated.

My car’s collapsed roof was the sole physical reminder of the collision, and a little patch of paint on one of the sign’s wood pillars was all that remained of it thereafter.

Thank you so much, brakes.

THE GENIUS OF DISC BRAKES

The disc brakes on my old Toyota were “floating caliper” disc brakes. Since replacing drum brakes as the primary method of stopping a car in the 1970s and 1980s, disc brakes have become prevalent in the automotive industry today. They were victorious, in my opinion, for the correct reasons: their design was simple and brilliant. When you step on a pedal, friction pads squeeze spinning discs linked to your wheels, causing them to spin. Simple. The design of a disc brake caliper, a crescent-shaped arrangement of pieces located next to your wheel, is a stroke of brilliance.

It is at this point when the magic happens.

As a result of the sliding, a second brake pad is forced against the exterior of the rotor.

What’s the upshot? You’re compressing the rotor from both sides in the same manner. It’s an excellent method of bringing an automobile to a halt. This animation, which I saw in a YouTube video, does a good job of demonstrating how the caliper slips.

A STUCK BRAKE CALIPER

It signifies that the brake caliper isn’t slipping to the right as it should. Either that, or it isn’t sliding at all. Additionally, you may notice creaking when you brake, or you may simply get the impression that something isn’t quite right. There are a variety of potential reasons. It’s possible that anything is amiss with the brake line or piston. However, a seized caliper pin is the most common cause of the problem. The caliper guide pins, which are the little rails along which the caliper glides, become slow or seized in one or both directions.

“Caliper pin stuck” is the technical term.

A STUCK CALIPERUNEVEN BRAKE PAD WEAR

One symptom that you have a seized or jammed caliper is that your brake pads aren’t wearing out evenly as they should. Because the outside pad is not pushing against the rotor as strongly as the inner pad, it does not wear down as quickly as the inner pad. In the video below, ChrisFix, a widely popular technician on YouTube, demonstrates the uneven wear on brake pads he obtained from a 2008 Honda Accord in action. He demonstrates how, in principle, unevenness may be induced by a crooked piston, which he describes in detail.

REPLACING A STUCK BRAKE CALIPER

In the case of a seized caliper, uneven wear on the brake pads is one of the telltale signs of the problem. Because the outside pad is not pushing against the rotor as strongly as the inner pad, it does not wear down as quickly as the inner pad. n ChrisFix, a widely popular technician on YouTube, demonstrates the uneven wear on brake pads taken from a 2008 Honda Accord in the video below. Using an example of a crooked piston, he demonstrates how the unevenness may theoretically be created. He reveals that the problem is not a piston, but rather a pin that has been lodged in the rear of the vehicle’s caliper.

HAMMERING OFF A SEIZED CALIPER

You may notice that your brake pads aren’t wearing evenly if you have a jammed or seized caliper. Because the outer pad is not pushing against the rotor as strongly as the inner pad, it is not wearing down as quickly as the inner pad. ChrisFix, a widely renowned technician on YouTube, demonstrates the uneven wear on brake pads he obtained from a 2008 Honda Accord in the video below. He illustrates how a crooked piston, in principle, may be the source of the unevenness. However, as he demonstrates, the problem is not a clogged piston, but a clogged brake caliper pin.

PULLING OUT A STUCK CALIPER PIN

The most common technique to get access to a “caliper pin stuck” is to simply pull it out, albeit this is unlikely to be effective on a frozen or seize caliper pin. An instructional video produced by the YouTube technician Fixbook in 2013 has received over half a million views to date. A socket wrench is used to twist the end of the trapped caliper pin back and forth, and this is seen in the video.

Then he repeats the process with vise-grips, with the addition of a hammer and screwdriver on occasion. Despite the fact that he finally resorts to using a propane torch (which we’ll discuss in more detail later), his video demonstrates the pulling technique in action.

REMOVING A SEIZED CALIPER PIN WITH ITS OWN BOLT

The following suggestion is both brilliant and straightforward. The bolt that is threaded into the end of the caliper pin is used as a lever to simply push the pin out of its hole. A YouTube technician going by the moniker Alpha G Male has a video in which he demonstrates how to fix a jammed caliper pin on a Nissan Altima by putting washers and a coupler over the end of the pin. Then he screws the sliding pin’s bolt into the pin by tightening the bolt. The washers and coupler combine to form a lever, and he simply cranks the caliper pin out of its jam.

TORCHING A STUCK BRAKE CALIPER PIN

A YouTube video with over 200,000 views shows a seized caliper pin, and Brian of BriansMobile1 states that “heat is the only method to pull things out.” His GMC Sonoma has a caliper pin that has been trapped, which he deals with in the video. He places the caliper bracket into a vice and uses a Bernzomatic propane torch to heat up the region around the pin in the bracket. It takes him approximately five minutes to loosen the pin sufficiently that he can pull it out with vise-grips. He’s done it!

REPLACING A STUCK BRAKE CALIPER BRACKET

“Heat is the only way to pull these out,” says Brian of BriansMobile1, referring to a seized caliper pin in a YouTube video that has received more than 200,000 hits. His GMC Sonoma has a caliper pin that has been jammed, as shown in the video. It is clamped into the vice and heated up around the pin with a Bernzomatic propane torch, which he has brought along with him. With the use of vise-grips, he was able to loosen the pin sufficiently so that he could pull it out.

CLEANING OR REPLACING SEIZED CALIPER PINS

To clean a caliper pin in this scenario, every technician who does so does so with either a wire brush or a wire wheel, basically rubbing away any rust or gunk that they come across. Some of them also clean the interior of the bores that keep the pins in place, according to the manufacturer. Alternatively, a YouTube technician with the handle innocuous name has a video with more than 100,000 views on “How to Remove a Frozen Caliper Pin in Less Than 5 Minutes.” He removes the pin with the help of a torch.

“I’m going to go ahead and assume I’m going to damage this pin,” he adds.

LUBRICATE SLIDE PINSWITH SILICONE

Two forms of brake grease have been shown to be effective in lubricating sliding pins: silicone and PAG (Polyalkylene Glycol). According to Dow Corning’s Gary Weber, this is the case. See his presentationSmart NVH Solutions for Next Generation Brake Designand see the 11th slide for more information.) Silicone and polyacrylamide grease (PAG) are both synthetic greases, and they are two of the six forms of synthetic grease. Some brake greases, according to Weber and a number of mechanics who have tested them, are ineffective on pins.

One concern is how grease affects the performance of rubber seals.

These rubber pieces might expand if you do not use silicone or PAG to seal them.

The following is an excellent explanation provided by Eric the Car Guy, a widely popular YouTube mechanic: “If you use ordinary oil, it will dry up and cause the pins to seize.” In this clip from his movie, you can see him using 3M Silicone Paste to lubricate his guide pins.

INSTALLING CALIPER PIN BOOTS

As previously discussed, caliper pins are protected by rubber boots that keep them clean and free of debris. In addition, they frequently feature rubber bushings to aid in movement and support. How much does it cost to replace the rubber components of a brake job? It costs less than $6 to replace all of the brakes on a 2015 Toyota RAV4 when you visit RockAuto. So, what is the proper way to attach a caliper pin boot to a pin? The YouTube algorithm is a complicated thing. Kowyn has a video that demonstrates how to do it.

CONCLUSION

I really hope that you were able to find what you were searching for on our website. What a “caliper pin stuck” is and how to cope with it are both explained here. How to get rid of it. What to do if it’s dirty or needs replacing. And what sort of grease should be used on it, if any. According to YourMechanic, brake pads have a life span of between 25,000 and 70,000 miles, depending on where you live and how you drive your vehicle. As a result, by the time you have your next brake work, the distance you’ll have traveled since your last one will be similar to 18 journeys from New York to Los Angeles on average.

  1. As a result, your brake pads are worn out and other elements of your braking system are worn out as well, so you should repair the hardware during your next brake maintenance.
  2. A fire vehicle had already arrived by the time my feet touched the ground.
  3. Afterwards, he assisted me in moving my automobile away from the Vandenberg AFB sign, which was about as difficult as moving a refrigerator a few feet across a kitchen floor.
  4. I’ll say it again: Thank you, brakes.
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What Does the Lower Brake Caliper Bolt’s Slide Pin Rubber Do?

Have you ever wondered what the sleeve on the lowerbrake caliperbolt is for? This page discusses what the sliding pin rubber on the lower brake caliper bolt is and what it’s role is.

Why Is There a Rubber Sleeve on the Lower Brake Caliper Bolt?

If you’ve ever had the pleasure of doing a rake job on a rusted car, you’ve almost certainly come across the technical nightmare known as a “lower brake caliper sliding bolt,” which can be found on the brake caliper of the lower brake caliper. Now, if you have completely forgotten about this hardware-laden recollection, or if you are unfamiliar with this particular form of bolt, I will try my best to assist you. A bolt like this is one of those that refuses to come out of its hole because rust has effectively welded it to the brake caliper mounting bracket.

It is the threaded evil that must be removed with a chisel and a sledgehammer when the ratchet fails to do its one function. Yep. That’s the bolt that we’re going to be talking about today.

A Theory: The Brake Caliper Slide Pin Rubber Is an Anti-Rattle Device

As a result, if you have ever successfully removed this bolt (which is not common in the Northeast), you will know that it has a pretty charming tiny rubbery sleeve on the end of it, seemingly designed to mock each and every one of your superhuman removal attempts. The upper caliper bolt does not have this adorable rubber sleeve, so what in the world was the point of putting one on the lower caliper bolt, since the upper caliper bolt has? Unfortunately, I don’t have an answer for you at this time.

These adorable tiny rubber caliper bolt “sleeves” (that’s the most frequent word for them) are anti-rattle devices that are installed on the calipers to prevent them from rattling.

It functions in a similar way to a shock absorber, in that it slows down and dampens the motions of the calipers when they are applied.

All bets are off, however, when that rubbery sleeve prevents the caliper bolt from slipping, or when corrosion begins to drag the car back into the ground.

What Do You Think?

So, does this idea have any merit? Do you have a more detailed description of what the rubber caliper bolt sleeve is truly responsible for? Tell us about it in the comment section below.

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Brief SynopsisArticle Title What Is the Function of the Slide Pin Rubber on the Lower Brake Caliper Bolt? The AutoDescription is 1A in this case. Read on to learn what the sliding pin rubber sleeve on the lower brake caliper bolt performs in this article, in which our expert offers one possible explanation. AuthorJeremy NuttPublisher Name1A AutoPublisher Logo AuthorJeremy NuttPublisher Name1A AutoPublisher Logo

Sticking Slide Pins

Sticking slide pins cause uneven brake pad wear in floating caliper braking systems, which is a common occurrence. They can get frozen as a result of environmental pollution, and removing them might be challenging. It is possible that replacement pins and sleeves may be necessary to correct this situation. Never remove the gold or chrome finish by grinding it off. It exposes the pin to pitting and excessive wear, making it prone to failure. For the most part, a rubber bushing or O-ring is wrapped around the pin to help it find and fit snugly into the bore.

  • Avoid using lubricants that cause rubber components to expand, resulting in the bushings being stuck in their bores.
  • This mount, which is incorporated or fastened to the knuckle, allows them to ride or float on it.
  • Immediately following contact between the inboard pad and the rotor, the caliper moves or pushes the outboard pad into contact with the other side of the rotor.
  • The car comes to a complete stop as a result of the friction between the two pads.
  • This suggests that the inner pad is responsible for the majority, if not the whole braking action.
  • Rails or paths on the mounting bracket allow the sliding caliper to move freely.
  • This binding causes early inboard pad wear as a result of the binding.
  • Wear or loose slide pins or caliper slides cause caliper twisting, which results in reduced braking performance.
  • When it comes to rubber components, a high-temperature silicone or synthetic lubricant that has been specifically created for these rubber parts is required.

Any metal to metal component, such as the slides on sliding calipers, will benefit from the use of a high-temperature graphite or synthetic lubricant developed for metal to metal contact at high temperatures.

How to clean and lubricate brake caliper slide pins

It is important that you read the disclaimer before using this website. In addition, please keep in mind that any links supplied may be part of an affiliate program (for example, eBay or Amazon), which helps to fund the site by generating revenue for me if a visitor makes a qualifying purchase. Cleaning and re-lubricating your brake caliper sliding pins should be a quick and simple task, regardless of whether you are researching the cause of your dragging or stuck brakes or simply performing routine maintenance.

What exactly are sliding pins?

If they are stuck, the brake pads may remain in contact with the brake disc long after you have released the brake lever, causing the vehicle to skid.

When the caliper is still attached to the bike, it is much simpler to release the sliding pin bolts.

We may now remove the sliding pin bolts, which, as you can see, will require a thorough cleaning before they can be reinstalled: Once you have removed both of these, you should see that the brake caliper separates into two sections – one side with the piston, and the other side with the caliper spring and retaining pin.

Closer: If a little metal bracket that looks like this were to fall off, it would look like this: it rests next to the sliding pins, where the brake pads are: and the following was re-inserted: Of course, this is an excellent opportunity to give everything a thorough cleaning – we recommend steel wool and mild rubbing – here’s an example of before and after: Let’s get back to the sliding pins.

  1. You should be able to hold it with your fingers and pull it out as shown below: If your brakes have been dragging and the sliding pins are the source of the problem, they may be trapped in and require wiggling, twisting, or even more effort to be removed from the vehicle.
  2. The rubber boot comes off easily and can only be put back on in one direction: up.
  3. This became stuck quite quickly and took a significant amount of pulling to be removed.
  4. The service history for this specific CX stated that it had been rebuilt 1,000 kilometers prior, and that both sleeves had been enlarged and ripped.
  5. We were fortunate in that we had many extra sets of calipers on hand, as well as a pair of pins with complete rubbers that were borrowed.
  6. After you have cleaned and lubricated the sliding pins, apply synthetic brake caliper lubricant to them as follows: Only synthetic brake caliper lubricant meant for slide pins should be used; anything else will not survive the circumstances and will result in the slide pins becoming stuck.
  7. Applying the greasing is as follows: Apply a thin coating of product: Then we work our way backwards, reinserting the sliding pins into their clean and dry bores to ensure that they can be readily inserted and withdrawn.
  8. Once you are pleased with the sliding pins, reassemble the caliper, being sure to replace any metal shims that have fallen out, and torque the caliper to the following specifications: Torque applied to the caliper bracket Slide pin bolts require a certain amount of torque.

If the issue was with the sliding pins being clogged, your calipers should now be able to move freely once more. Did you find this article to be useful? Visit the site and make a donation to help keep the content coming!

Servicing Brake Calipers

12th of September, 2014 If you aren’t a die-hard automobile enthusiast, it’s possible that you aren’t aware of all of the maintenance that must be performed in order to keep your vehicle running at peak performance. Brake caliper servicing is a crucial procedure that you may not be aware your car need until it is too late. You might be wondering what brake calipers are. Let me explain. When you apply the brakes, the brake calipers hold the brake pads in place and, with the support of brackets, pistons, and caliper sliding pins, assist in pushing the pads into the braking rotors.

  • It is because of this lack of lubrication that several things occur.
  • Secondly, the sliding pins may become jammed, forcing the brake pad to make repeated contact with the braking rotor.
  • Third, your brakes’ stopping ability may be diminished as a result of the brake pads not contacting the whole surface of the braking rotor when applied.
  • However, despite the fact that the slide pins are protected by a rubber cover, brake dust and rust accumulation accumulate on them, making it difficult for the calipers to slide.
  • If metal is not cleaned on a regular basis, the compounds in the salt can be toxic and even caustic to the metal.
  • Cleaning and lubricating the sliding pins is part of the service we do for your brake calipers.
  • After that, we lubricate the pin with a heat-resistant lubricant and slip it back into place, which should be straightforward.
  • In the event that you do not know when your brake calipers were last serviced, it is not possible for us to determine if they need to be serviced without disassembling the brakes.
  • From that point on, you should get your calipers serviced on a regular basis, which may vary according on where you live in the country.
  • In drier climates such as Texas or Arizona, you may never have to worry about your calipers breaking down completely.
  • We can assist you with extending the life of your brake pads, which will save you money and provide you with peace of mind knowing that your brakes are in proper operating order.

To arrange an appointment, please call our Auto Repair and Service Department at 715-833-0430 or visit our online scheduling page. Posted inNews,Service,Uncategorized|Comments Off on Why Brake Caliper Maintenance is Important

Front Caliper Slide [Bushing] Pin Position? The Answer.

During the course of performing a complete brake overhaul/restore/upgrade, my disassembly of parts was completed very quickly in order to prepare them for refinishing with muriatic/phosphoric acid baths, then G2 Caliper Coating, all new seals, boots, plates and associated hardware, etc., so that I could move on to the detail rebuilds, which included that of the rear calipers with parking brake mechanisms, captive spring/cogs, and numerous c So I’m just recounting the fact that it was a major pain in the neck.

  • But let’s get to the point: During the disassembly process, I neglected to take note of the location of the front caliper sliding pins that were cut to fit these rubber bushings, as well as the position of the pair that were not meant to allow this rubber bushing.
  • I’ve come across a lot of different opinions about where they should be placed on the spectrum.
  • GM handles it one way, but Japanese automakers appear to do it another, with some having them at both the upper and lower places for each side of the car on the same side of the vehicle.
  • And what, exactly, is the function of these bushings in the first place?
  • In the course of re-assembling the pins, I made the decision to leave these bushings off because they might be a source of binding and other difficulties in the future.
  • Assuming I am fortunate enough to have previously placed them in the top while removing them to insert these, I will not be required to disassemble the lower pin/boot or even to disconnect the lower pin/bolt from its mounting bracket on the spindle.
  • According to the layer of pad material that is being put down, it looks like the pressure on the rotor’s outer perimeter is slightly larger than the pressure on the inner perimeter, however I have seen some improvement after the previous two of journeys about town.
  • However, I’m not sure if the original purpose of these bushings was to lessen brake shudder, prevent grease from gathering in the pin channel’s ‘pit,’ or to assist in the generation of more equal pad pressure by “shimming” the end of the first pin struck in the wheel rotation.
  • According to what I’ve read, a number of ‘professional’ mechanics choose to entirely skip these bushings.
  • The e-brake issue was resolved with a couple of turns of the adjusting nut in the center console, and everything worked correctly the first time.

The purpose of this article is to provide 100% confirmation as to what position Hyundai originally intended the bushing sliding pins to be in (it’s the uppers!) and to discuss what I believe to be a possible source of ever-so-slightly uneven pad pressure as a result of their removal from the vehicle.

The channels were thoroughly cleaned, and synthetic brake grease was applied in the proper proportions in all of the appropriate locations.

Please see the attachments for more information.

Hyundai OE PN Vendor Stock581622F300 58162B (Top – Slide Pin Machined for Bushing)581612F300 58161B (Bottom – Slide Pin Machined for Bushing)581612F300 58161B (Bottom – Slide Pin Machined for Bushing) (Bottom – Slide Pin NOT Machined for Bushing)

Caliper Slide Pin Problem – It Keeps Sliding Back Out.

I’m open to hearing your thoughts on this one. I purchased a pair of Centric Posi-Quiet loaded calipers from the company. Although a friend informed me that the slider pins should already be lubricated (which Centric verified), he still prefers to pull the slider pins just to be certain. It’s all about having peace of mind. Okay, so I install one of the calipers to the car and proceed to extract a pin from the caliper itself. As seen on the right side of this generic image, I pulled an upper pin, the one with a rubber “ring” at the tip, and it came out like this: Yes, it has been lubricated to my complete pleasure.

  1. So I put the pin back in and it slowly pulls out, at least 3/4 of the way “.
  2. It gently slips out, at least 3/4 of the way, after I unhooked the dust boot so that it wasn’t completely sealed “.
  3. I was successful in removing some grease.
  4. Do we have a sense of a pattern yet?:ahh: Okay, now I’m starting to feel irritated.
  5. I re-insert a clean zip tie and apply the tiniest, most insignificant amount of lubricant to the end.
  6. So I put the pin back in and it slowly pulls out, at least 3/4 of the way “.:dammit:.:dammit: I’m at a lost for words.
  7. This will take place in the morning.
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When I push them in, the other three only move a small amount, which is most likely due to the dust boot returning back to its uncompressed form after being compressed.

Ultimately, the goal of this entire exercise is to alleviate a heat issue I’ve been experiencing with the brakes on this car.

I’m thinking of using one of the sliders from the original calipers as well.

However, I seldom shout HELP!

I’m in trouble.

Brake Caliper Slide Pin Cleaning and Lubrication

On this one, I’m open to hearing your ideas. The Centric Posi-Quiet loaded calipers were purchased by me. After hearing from a friend who said that the slider pins should already be lubricated (which Centric verified) he decided that he’d better pull the slider pins to be sure. Basically, it’s for the sake of your own personal peace of mind. Okay, so I install one of the calipers to the car and start to extract a pin from the caliper housing. As seen on the right side of this typical picture, I withdrew an upper pin, the one with a rubber “ring” at the tip.

In order to do this, I insert the pin again and it gently glides out, at least 3/4 of the way out “, In order to do this, I insert the pin again and it gently glides out, at least 3/4 of the way out “, In order to do this, I insert the pin again and it gently glides out, at least 3/4 of the way out “, Thinking there could be air behind it, I detach the dust boot so it isn’t completely sealed and press the pin back in, and out it gently goes, at least 3/4 of the way “, I attempted to remove some grease from the hole with a plastic zip tie, thinking there could be a glob of grease deep within.

  • I was successful in removing part of the grease.
  • Okay, I’m starting to feel irritated now.
  • A clean zip tie is inserted and the slightest bit of oil is applied to the end of the tie for a finished look.
  • In order to do this, I insert the pin again and it slowly glides out, at least 3/4 of the way out “Damn it, I’m late for work.
  • Next step will be to remove the rubber “ring” from the tip and see what occurs.
  • Any more pins are being pulled to check for lubricant, and I am really hesitant to do so.
  • The other three only move a bit when I push them in.
  • In order to resolve a heat issue I’ve been experiencing with this vehicle’s brakes, the complete exercise is being performed.

I’m thinking of using one of the sliders from the original calipers as a backup option. Those pins are quite fresh, since I changed them a few months ago in an attempt to resolve the heat issue, which was ultimately unsuccessful. I seldom shout HELP!, but here I go: HELP! I’m in trouble.

  1. Date of joining:October 25, 20104982660 Location:Maryland Vehicle: 2010 Toyota Prius Model:IV My 2010 Prius has already accumulated 59,000 miles and has been in service for 46 months. Because of the concerns stated in this forum regarding accidently activating diagnostic fault codes, I have put off cleaning and lubricating the brake caliper components (DTC). I service the brakes every two years or 30,000 miles, whichever comes first. Yesterday, I made the decision that it was past time to repair the brakes, and I am delighted to say that I did it without setting the dreaded DTC. How I accomplished it was as follows: Positive and negative battery connections were disconnected. Neither the driver’s door nor the brake pedal were opened until after the brakes were reinstalled and the battery had been reconnected. Using the front calipers as an example, I first removed the two caliper bolts and then gently tilted out the top ear of the caliper just enough to enable room for the top sliding pin to be removed. The top slide pin was cleaned, lubricated, and replaced after I reinserted it. Then, after pushing the top ear of the caliper back in, I carefully tipped out the lower ear of the caliper and removed the bottom slide pin. Once the bottom slide pin was cleaned and oiled, I proceeded to reattach the caliper bolts that had been removed. By doing it this manner, I avoided having to remove the caliper and then maybe compress the cylinder to replace it, which would have increased the possibility of triggering a DTC. If you are working on the back calipers, I don’t think there is any way to get the caliper sliding pins out without first removing the caliper. I made the decision to remove the caliper because I suspected that the rear brakes were not controlled by the regenerative system. Before removing the rear caliper, I gently pressed it against the rotor to slightly compress the caliper piston before removing it. After removing the calipers, I cleaned and oiled the sliding pins on the calipers before reinstalling them. Everything was able to be put back together without incident. What I discovered was that the brake rotors and pads on both the front and back wheels were in good condition. It was unnecessary for me to test the pad thicknesses because they appear to be virtually brand new. The sliding surfaces in the brackets on which the brake pads slide were clean and free of evident wear or corrosion. As long as they appeared to be functioning properly, I didn’t bother doing anything to them. There was still plenty of excellent oil on the front caliper slide pins, and it was not discolored, but it was beginning to become thick. The rear caliper slide pins were in desperate need of treatment. The grease had deteriorated into a thin black coating. One of the rear pins was on the verge of drying out. Conclusions and Recommendations: The brakes were in great condition, with the exception of the rear caliper sliding pins. Rear caliper pins should be maintained at the recommended intervals to avoid premature braking pad and rotor wear. Several users on this site have mentioned having to change rear brake pads and rotors after only a few thousand miles, which I believe is a rather low mileage. Due to front regenerative braking, the front brakes of conventional automobiles often perform more work and generate more heat than the rear brakes. However, this may not be the case with the Prius. This conclusion is based on the difference I discovered in the quality of the front and rear caliper oil. No DTCs were set and everything worked perfectly thereafter, making this a safe method for an experienced DIYer, in my opinion. I did not provide images or more extensive instructions with this because you should not do this if you do not have prior expertise working on brakes. The brakes now seem smoother and more effective, which is most likely owing to the restoration of the rear caliper pin lubrication and the ease with which the caliper can travel
  2. Thank you for writing this article. It appears that you could check your rears every 30k miles or every 2 years and your fronts every 60k miles or every 4 years and be OK
  3. Den, you’re right. Thank you for the excellent report. I have 122K miles on my vehicle and am the second owner. I am much beyond due for this critical service. But I’m not going to go out this weekend since your story has given me the kick in the pants I need. You’ve brought up some really significant points. I believe that once the LV battery has been detached, the car should be dead, but it is still a good idea to avoid touching the driver’s door. Light silicone grease will be used on the sliders, and high-temp brake oil (available in tiny ketchup packets at the counter of parts stores) will be used where the pads contact the caliper and where the pads contact the caliper carrier, as described above. Only the lightest coat was worn, and that was it. A gentle, little wire brush across those contact areas is all that is needed to knock the dust off and then the grease, which is mostly for corrosion prevention purposes. I’m curious what kind of grease you used on the sliders. I believe the high-temperature brake oil is very thick. In addition, the sliders don’t grow too hot and don’t have to bear any of the braking forces themselves. They just serve to maintain the caliper’s position on the pads. The brake pads are responsible for transferring braking forces to the caliper carrier. Thank you again
  4. I was wondering whether pumping the brakes a few times before to connecting the 12 volt would help avoid codes if you did need to push back one or more of the pistons (or if you did so accidently when swinging the caliper back into position)? Is it a good idea? According to what I’ve heard, any amount of additional movement of the piston will cause the car’s computer to go crazy. And, in the event that it does freak out, is there any low-tech remedy? If I’m not incorrect, someone here was discussing the possibility of connecting a paper clip jumper between two plug pins. And, just to follow up on Bill’s question, what is your preferred grease for the pins
  5. Date of joining:July 12, 2011,6,7313,0571 Location:NJ Vehicle:Another Electric Vehicle (Other Electric Vehicle) Model:N/AT Upon further consideration, the 12V battery is maintained by the traction battery, therefore just unplugging it may not be sufficient. It’s possible that you’ll have to remove the orange emergency fuse for the large battery as well. Date of joining:October 25, 20104982660 Location:Maryland Vehicle: 2010 Toyota Prius Model:IVI The caliper sliding pins were lubricated with the “SIL-GLYDE Brake Lubricant” shown below. The SIL-GLYDE was chosen above the Ultra Synthetic or Ceramic Extreme lubricants listed below, which I had considered using on my other larger vehicles, but I opted against it since it felt and looked exactly like the current original equipment manufacturer (OEM) oil on my other larger cars. Any of these options will very certainly be satisfactory. Due to the fact that they looked wonderful and because grease on these slides might attract dirt or harden, it was decided not to use any on them. However, this can occasionally make issues worse if you apply too much grease. However, if I believed that the pad slides needed to be lubricated, I would use the Sta-Lube grease listed below. The substance is also effective when applied to the backing plate contact sites of drum brakes. Date of joining:October 25, 20104982660 Location:Maryland Vehicle: 2010 Toyota Prius Model:IV It’s interesting that there are now two topics in this forum where individuals have reported that their rear brakes have locked up and that they have had to replace rotors, pads, calipers, and other components. If the caliper sliding pin lubricant breaks down and evaporates, as I discovered on my rear brakes, it is conceivable that this is the cause of the problem. The caliper does not slide easily and the pads do not fully release if the slide pins are not properly lubricated. Because of this, it is possible for the pads to remain in contact with the rotor, resulting in heat. If the temperature rises to a certain point, the caliper may seize, resulting in the destruction of the rotor, pads, caliper, hub, bearings, and other components. My initial article just cited the absence of sliding pin lubrication as a general cause of early pad degradation, not as a specific cause. In light of this, I am beginning to believe that the narrow rotors and low weight calipers on the back of the Gen3 Prius make it more susceptible to overheating and catastrophic braking failure when the sliding pin oil evaporates than other cars. If you want to avoid an expensive brake repair, I expect that Toyota dealers and preventive maintenance skeptics will tell you that your brakes don’t need to be serviced. However, it appears to me that cleaning and lubricating the caliper slide pins every two years or 30,000 miles should be included in your service schedule. Bill Norton’s biscoand such like this
  6. In addition, there have been previous entries that have the same problem. It is possible that the frequency with which it is required is influenced by the environment. Those living in areas with genuine winters and salted roads are likely to require the service more frequently than those living in much of Northern California, for example
  7. The Canadian Schedule asks for a visual examination every 12 months and a more thorough “service” every 24 months
  8. It was the 2nd anniversary of my marriage when I phoned our local Toyota Repair department and inquired about brake service. They just shrugged me off, indicating that it was not required. (Is this yet another “sealed” unit?) That happened around six months ago. I’m debating whether or not I should continue. On the other hand, if they’re so reluctant to accept the position, it’s possible that they’re not the greatest prospects. In terms of electronics, it’s a genuine catch-22: I’m comfortable with replacing pads, but not so enthusiastic about the chance of expelled pistons, warning lights, and other such annoyances. Date of joining:October 25, 20104982660 Location:Maryland Automobile:2010 Toyota PriusModel:IV Mendel is an aristocratic family from the Germanic tribes. On the basis of your previous posts, I believe you have sufficient knowledge of brakes and DIY ability to clean and lubricate the slide pins without experiencing adverse effects when performing the procedure described above
  9. I jackstanded the car and removed the calipers, removed and disassembled the pads/shims, then cleaned and reassembled the calipers with a thin layer of anti-seize compound on all contacting surfaces for both the front and rear. When I opened the pads, there was a very little dab or two of something that appeared similar to sil-glyde oil on them. Along with that, I removed the caliper pins and cleaned them with sil-Glyde (mentioned above). They weren’t completely parched, but they did appear to be in need of some moisture. The brake pins on the rear wheels were darker in appearance, as if they were heating up a little, but I’m not sure. In addition, the front pins are two distinct lengths from one another. The car has little over 43000 kilometers on the odometer, and the following are the statistics I obtained for pad thickness: Front left outer:7.9, front left inner:7.7, front right outer:7.9, front right inner:7.5, rear left outer:7.7, rear left inner:7.1, rear right outer:7.2, rear right inner:6.4, rear right outer:7.2, rear right inner:6.4, rear right outer:6.4, rear right inner:6.4, rear right outer:6.4, rear right inner:6.4, rear right outer:6.4, rear right inner:6.4, rear right outer:6.4, rear right inner (quarter sized fragment flaked off at center slot edge) For example, new front pads are 10 mm in diameter, close rears are 9.5 mm in diameter, and the minimum thickness for both is 1mm, however I’d replace them if they were 3mm or less. The torque value for the caliper mounting bolts (which screw into the caliper sliding pins) is 25 foot pounds for both the front and back of the caliper mounting bolt. When loosening or tightening these bolts, you’ll need a small 17 mm open end wrench to keep the pin from moving around. However, when exploring Princess Auto, I discovered a little slimmer wrench that performed just as well as my previous bulkier wrench. It has a thickness of around 6 mm. The earlier wrench had a thickness of 8 mm, which was far too thick. A few of words of caution: 1. Following the recommendations I’d read, I detached and isolated the negative line from the 12 volt power source. As an added precaution, I placed a glove over the hatch latch mechanism to prevent it from shutting and becoming unopenable. I left the driver’s door ajar just for the sake of insurance. When everything was finished and the car was back on the ground, I pressed the brake pedal several times to build up pressure, then connected the negative line from the 12 volt battery and tried to start it for a few seconds before shutting it down. There were no caution lights illuminated on the dashboard, which was a huge relief! When we embark on our drive today, I’m crossing my fingers that this will continue to be the case. It appeared that there was an excessive amount of drag while spinning the rear brake disks when I initially rebuilt them. After rereading the Repair Manual instructions this morning, I discovered that the rear caliper piston should be rotated to the right. On the face of this piston, there are four high parts and four depressions, forming a cross design. This should be done in such a way that the high cross is arranged in an x pattern, and such that there is a depression at the apex that corresponds to the pin on the back of the inner pad. This is described on a handful of pages in the Repair Manual, and I’m still not certain that they’ve presented it clearly enough. They claim that you may rotate it in either direction, clockwise or counterclockwise, to bring the piston out or into the chamber. It’s not really evident in which way to turn it, though. After everything was said and done, I used a heavy duty pair of offset needle nose pliers to spin the piston clockwise through about 45 degrees, which allowed me to advance the piston in somewhat and line up the piston’s depression with the pad’s pin in lieu of using the special tool. The disk spins much more smoothly when it has been reassembled. I believe I’ve figured it out: parking brake travel appears to be around the average. One issue I discovered after putting everything together was that I had to depress the brake pedal numerous times before connecting the 12 volt battery to the car. It was only after the first 1/2 dozen or so of those pushes that I noticed the clicking sound coming from the rear of the automobile this time. Then there will be no more. Perhaps anything like an automatic parking brake adjustment was taking place? I’m not sure what to say. Here are a few examples: Front right brake caliper has been lifted but has not been fully removed: One of the sliding pins for the front caliper: Front brake pads removed (from the interior, on the right): The right rear brake caliper has been detached and removed from the vehicle. Take note of the cross shape on the piston’s face. It is now not in the best possible position and requires a 45-degree rotation: Disassembly of rear brake pads (from the interior, on the right): Date of joining:October 25, 20104982660 Location:Maryland Vehicle:2010 PriusModel:IV^^^ Mendel. Congratulations on a job well done, as well as on the excellent reporting
  10. Date of joining:August 26, 20104,2942,32033 Location:Texas Vehicle:2015 Joined on March 10, 2012313580
  11. PriusModel:Four Location:NY Vehicle:2012 PriusModel:Two Couldn’t you just remove one guide pin at a time, lubricate it, and reinstall it if the purpose is to keep the guide pins from seizing in the first place? If so, what is the reasoning behind your removal of the caliber? Thanks
  12. Date of joining: September 29, 201334716619 Location:Canada Vehicle: 2013 Toyota Prius Hello, Den49. Every week, I use an alloy wheel cleaner from Wallmart to spray in my rims and water them out within 30 seconds of applying the cleaner. Because you appear to be highly knowledgeable about the Prius’ brakes, I’m curious if this cleaner has the capacity to eat away at the essential grease and other components that are required for the parts to function properly. A decade ago, I had to replace sticky sliding pins in a prior automobile, and I had uneven rear brake wear in another car that I had at the time. Those were both pricey repairs! It would be wonderful if the prius didn’t get stuck in that condition as well
  13. You could do it with the front end. Due to the park brake cable, it is quite difficult to maneuver with the rear. The calipers aren’t that heavy, and it’s more efficient to just pull them totally off
  14. What you’re cleaning, if you’re using a degreaser, is the rotors, which you should be cleaning anyhow. In order to lubricate the sliding pin, just remove or elevate the caliper from its position. The sliding pin is responsible for holding the caliper in place on the caliper bracket. Due to the fact that it is attached to the caliper bracket and tucked away by the sliding pin boot, you will not have to clean it out. When the sliding pin becomes seized due to a lack of lubricant after a significant amount of driving, this is what causes the uneven wear of the brake pads to occur. Whether you like it or not, the inner pads tend to wear out faster than the other pads. However, I haven’t examined my brakes yet, so I’m assuming the pads are in decent condition. In the future, I may apply lubricant to the sliding pins
  15. Cleaner may have an impact on the braking fluid hose and the different rubber boots, but I’m not sure. Periodic examination is required, and it is specified in the maintenance schedule. For use with pads and pins. I must admit, though, that it remained immaculate and brand new for more than three years. On the other hand, low mileage, garage storage, and a warm temperature (not much salting of the roads) are all advantages.
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October 25, 20104982660 has joined the group. Location:Maryland Prius (2010 model year): Model:IV A total of 59,000 miles have been traveled by my 2010 Prius, which has been on the road for 46 months. Because of the concerns stated in this forum regarding accidentally activating diagnostic fault codes, I have put off cleaning and lubricating the brake caliper components (DTC). I service the brakes every two years or 30,000 miles, whichever occurs first. Yesterday, I made the decision that it was past time to repair the brakes, and I am delighted to say that I did it without triggering the dreaded Diagnostic Trouble Codes.

  • Positive and negative battery terminals were disconnected.
  • The front calipers were disassembled by removing the two caliper bolts and tilting the top ear of the caliper out just far enough to give space for the removal of the top sliding pin.
  • Then, after pushing the top ear of the caliper back in, I carefully tipped the lower ear out of the caliper and removed the bottom slide pin.
  • Instead of removing the caliper and then perhaps compressing the cylinder to install it again, I saved time and avoided the possibility of triggering a diagnostic trouble code.
  • After much consideration, I chose to remove the caliper, reasoning that the rear brakes are not controlled by the regenerative system.
  • Using a wire brush, I cleaned and oiled the caliper sliding pins before putting them back in place.
  • What I discovered was that the brake rotors and pads on both the front and back wheels were in excellent condition.

The sliding surfaces in the brackets on which the brake pads slide were clean and free of evident wear or corrosion.’ As long as things looked to be functioning well, I didn’t intervene.

The rear caliper slide pins were in desperate need of repair.

There was a small amount of moisture on one of the back pins.

Several users on this site have mentioned having to change rear brake pads and rotors after only a few thousand miles, which I believe is a reasonable assumption.

This conclusion is based on the difference I discovered between the state of the front and rear caliper oil.

I did not provide images or more thorough instructions with this because you should not do this if you do not have previous experience working on brakes.

Congratulations on your article.

Den, you’re correct.

As the second owner of a vehicle with 122K miles, it is past time for this critical maintenance.

Several critical stages were raised by you.

A mild silicone grease will be used on the sliders, and high-temp brake oil (available in small ketchup packets at the counter of auto parts stores) will be used where the pads contact the caliper and where the pads contact the carrier.

A gentle, thin wire brush across those contact areas is all that is needed to knock the dust and oil off, which is mostly for corrosion prevention purposes.

High-temperature brake oil that is excessively thick, I believe, is the problem.

They just serve to maintain the caliper’s location on the pads of the tires.

I was wondering if pumping the brakes a few times prior to connecting the 12 volt will help avoid codes if you do need to push back one or more of the pistons (or if you accidently do so when swinging the caliper back into position).

From what I’ve heard, any amount of extra movement of the piston causes the computer in the automobile to go into a tailspin.

A paper clip jumper was mentioned somewhere, if I’m not incorrect, and it was to be connected to two plug pins.

12th of July, 20116,7313,0571 (joined) Location:NJ Other Electric Vehicle (Vehicle Type) Model:N/AT Just to throw something out there, the 12V battery is maintained by the traction battery, so simply unplugging it may not be sufficient.

October 25, 20104982660 has joined the group.

You should be able to use any of these options without any problems.

To oil the pad slides, however, I would use the Sta-Lube grease listed below if I felt it was necessary.

October 25, 20104982660 has joined the group.

If the caliper sliding pin lubricant is breaking down and evaporating, as I discovered on my rear brakes, it is probable that this is the cause of the problem.

When the pads remain in contact with the rotor for an extended period of time, heat can be generated.

Premature pad wear is a common problem that I noted in my initial post, but it is also a specific cause of this issue.

If you want to avoid an expensive brake repair, I expect that Toyota dealers and preventive maintenance skeptics will tell you that your brakes don’t need to be serviced.

Bill Norton, biscoand anything along these lines In addition, there have been previous posts describing the same issue.

Those living in areas with genuine winters and salted roads are likely to require the service more frequently than those living in much of Northern California; the Canadian Schedule asks for a visual examination every 12 months and a more in-depth “service” every 24 months.

They simply kind of shrugged me off, claiming that it wasn’t necessary.

About six months ago, something like that happened.

If they’re unwilling to take on the responsibility, it’s possible that they’re not the most qualified candidates.

October 25, 20104982660 has joined the group.

Mendel is an aristocratic family who lived in the Middle Ages.

A very little dab or two of something that appeared similar to sil-glyde oil was on the pads when I first opened them up.

However, they appeared to be in need of a bit more moisture than they did.

The front pins are also various lengths, which is another problem.

It is recommended that you use 25 foot pounds of torque for the caliper mounting bolts (which screw into the caliper slide pins).

However, when exploring Princess Auto, I discovered a somewhat slimmer wrench that functioned just as well as my previous bulkier wrench had.

The earlier wrench had a thickness of 8 mm, which was far too thick for most people.

1.

Another thing I did was place a glove over the hatch latch mechanism to keep it from shutting and becoming unopenable.

When everything was finished and the car was back on the ground, I pressed the brake pedal several times to build up pressure, then connected the negative line to the 12 volt battery and tried to start the car for a few seconds before shutting it down completely.

We are going on a drive today, so I am hoping that this continues to be the case.

This morning, I saw that the rear caliper piston should be rotated according to the instructions in the Repair Manual.

This should be done in such a way that the high cross is arranged in an x pattern, and such that there is a depression at the apex that corresponds to the pin on the back of the inner pad.

To bring the piston out or in, they say you may rotate the cylinder in either direction (clockwise or counterclockwise).

After everything was said and done, I utilized a heavy duty pair of offset needle nose pliers to spin the piston clockwise through about 45 degrees, which allowed me to slide the piston slightly inward and align the piston’s depression with the pad’s pin in lieu of a specific tool.

According on my observations, parking brake travel appears to be standard.

It was only after the first 1/2 dozen or so of those pushes that I noticed the clicking sound coming from the rear of the vehicle this time.

It is difficult to say without knowing for certain.

Rear right brake, caliper partially removed but still in position: Slide pins for the front calipers, one of which is seen here: (From the interior, on the right): Front brake pads dismantled Disconnected and pulled away from the rear right brake caliper Take note of the cross-shaped pattern on the piston’s front face.

Location:Maryland Vehicle:2010 PriusModel:IV^^^ Mendel.

Does it make sense to remove the caliber off your rifle?

On a weekly basis, I spray an alloy wheel cleaner from Wallmart into my rims and rinse it out within 30 seconds.

A decade ago, I had to replace sticky sliding pins in a prior automobile, and I had uneven rear brake wear in another car that I had at the time.

Although it is possible to do so with the front, it would be wonderful if the prius did not slip into that situation as well.

It is more effective to simply remove the calipers entirely off; what you are cleaning, if you are using a degreaser, is the rotors; the calipers are not that heavy, and pulling them totally off is more efficient.

The sliding pin is responsible for holding the caliper in place on the caliper bracket.

After many miles of driving, the sliding pin tends to lock up owing to a lack of oil, which is what causes the brake pads to wear unevenly.

Despite the fact that I haven’t examined my brakes yet, I believe the pads are in proper working order.

Inspections should be performed on a regular basis, as specified in the maintenance manual.

Pads and pins are used in this application. For three and a half years, it remained immaculate and brand new-looking. On the other hand, low mileage, garage storage, and a moderate temperature (with less salting of the roads) are all advantages.

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