Can you use universal coolant?

Is it OK to use universal coolant? No. Several coolant manufacturers claim their coolant work in all makes and all models. In other words, they want you to think their product is a universal coolant / antifreeze.

Can I put universal coolant in my car?

The term ‘Universal Coolant’ seems like a contradiction because of all the different antifreeze requirements we just described. Even so, universal coolants are formulated to mix with virtually any coolant. The makers of these product say their antifreeze can be safely used in any year, make or model of vehicle.

What happens if you use universal coolant?

When a universal coolant is used to top off a cooling system that already contains an extended life OAT or hybrid coolant, the service life is unaffected. It remains five years or 150,000 miles. The corrosion inhibitors in all types of coolant eventually wear out and must be replenished by changing the coolant.

Is universal coolant bad?

Use the coolant that is specified in your owner’s manual. If you just need to top it up, the recommendation is still the same, however, it is unlikely to cause any serious problems if you add a liter of a different type of coolant, as long as you follow the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule.

Can you use any coolant in any car?

There are lots of different types of antifreeze and it’s crucial to understand that there is no single antifreeze that’s suitable for all makes and models. The best thing to do is to always use the antifreeze that’s recommended by your car manufacturer.

Can I top off coolant with universal coolant?

The new universal coolants use unique OAT -based corrosion packages with proprietary organic acids (such as carboxylate) to provide broad spectrum protection. When a universal coolant is used to top off a cooling system that already contains an extended-life OAT or hybrid coolant, the service life is unaffected.

Can I mix different brands of engine coolant?

You should never mix different types of coolant if you are not an expert on the chemical composition and reactions of the various types. Stay on the safe side and follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. Using the wrong type of coolant can lead to expensive repair costs.

Is it bad to mix different color coolant?

The two coolants should never be mixed together as they do not react well. When mixed together they can form a thick, jelly-like substance that can completely stop all coolant flow which can lead to overheating. The water pump may overheat and stop working. In severe cases, head gaskets can blow, and heads may warp.

Is all blue coolant the same?

Typically, Valvoline says, coolant comes in green. But there are other colors available: orange, blue, purple, even yellow and pink. However, they’re not different colors for appearance’s sake. Each manufacturer designs its engines around a specific coolant or antifreeze standard with different additives.

Can I use pink coolant instead of green?

Absolutely yes. But don’t mix up two different types of coolant as it may lead to some damaging effects.

Can you use green coolant instead of orange?

Can I mix green coolant with orange coolant? This is one of those questions usually asked after the fact, and usually engine damage has already occurred. The green and orange coolants do not mix. When mixed together they form a gel-like substance that stops coolant flow, and consequently, the engine overheats.

What is universal antifreeze coolant?

MSDS. STP® Universal (All Season) Antifreeze/Coolant is a superior quality ethylene glycol-based engine coolant with a low silicate corrosion inhibitor package. This product protects coolant system metals, including heat-rejecting aluminum, against pitting caused by cavitation and corrosion.

What color is O’Reilly universal antifreeze?

O’Reilly 1 Gallon Yellow 50/50 Coolant/Antifreeze.

Can I put regular coolant in my VW?

So what kind of antifreeze do you use in your VW? It is highly recommended that you don’t use any kind other than the specific Audi/VW G13 or G12 approved antifreeze. Regular, store-bought antifreeze often has chemicals in it that can wear down gaskets and other parts in your system.

Can you use universal coolant?

No. Several coolant producers claim that their products are compatible with all makes and models. In other words, they want you to believe that their product is a universal coolant / antifreeze when in fact it is neither. I’m sorry to break the news to you, but there is no such thing. There CANNOT be any due to the fact that the metal alloys, polymers, and seals used in each engine are unique. There are several different types of coolant available, and each one has a particular sort of anti-corrosion ingredient to combat corrosion.

Still others will work with plastics, while others will soften and destroy plastics, according to the situation.

Alternatively, they eliminate specific types of chemicals that are necessary for avoiding corrosion in particular engines but that might cause interaction difficulties when used in conjunction with other coolants.

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What’s in antifreeze coolant?

The foundation component of most manufacturer-specific antifreeze coolant formulae is Polyethylene Glycol, which is present in concentrations ranging from 85 to 95 percent. Polyethylene Glycol keeps things from freezing and overheating, but it doesn’t defend against corrosion in any way. Additional corrosion prevention inhibitor chemicals account for 5 to 15% of the total amount in use. Anticorrosion agents defend against metal corrosive, galvanic action, and cavitation erosion. Anticorrosion agents must be compatible with rubber and plastic seals, gaskets, and fittings, as well as with the materials used to manufacture them.

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There are two types of antifreeze corrosion inhibitors — Inorganic and organic

The old green IAT coolant is based on ethylene glycol or propylene glycol and contains corrosion inhibitors such as silicates, sodium or potassium salts of inorganic anions such as phosphate, borate, nitrite, and nitrate, as well as other anions. Two or more of these compounds are present in variable proportions in a specific coolant formulation. As a copper corrosion inhibitor, the formula often incorporates an azole molecule such as tolyltriazole, benzotriazole, or mercaptobenzothiazole. Because silicate and phosphate corrosion inhibitors are rapidly acting, they can begin to work protecting exposed iron and aluminum surfaces in a short period of time.

  1. Silica hydrates act as a protective layer for everything in the cooling system, including the rubber components themselves.
  2. In fact, after just 10,000 miles, they can deteriorate to less than 20% of their original value.
  3. Even worse, silicates have the potential to precipitate out of solution and create deposits.
  4. The problem can be exacerbated in older vehicles that have a heater control valve that limits coolant flow to the heater core in order to modify heater core heat output.
  5. A good corrosion inhibitor for aluminum and cast iron components is phosphate, which acts as an anodic inorganic corrosion inhibitor when exposed to anodic conditions.

Phosphates, on the other hand, react badly with hard water and can cause scale to build up in the cooling system, clogging the radiator and heater core. Antifreeze with a typical green silicate composition

Then why use silicate coolants?

Because they provide excellent protection for both iron block and aluminum cylinder head engines, they are widely used. It interacts with the metals in the cooling system to generate a protective anode coating that is actually absorbed into the metal, causing it to become ‘passivated.’ It is effective due to the fact that it is an ANODIC inhibitor. Whenever the anodic film layer’s current density exceeds that of the cathode current density, the metal components are said to be ‘passivated.’ Insoluble and impermeable, the silicate coating protects the material beneath it.

  1. Antifreeze made of silicates is similarly prone to gelling.
  2. In European automobiles, silicate formulations are often employed.
  3. Nitrates, on the other hand, have a short shelf life and do not perform well on aluminum and aluminum alloys.
  4. However, Borate is very corrosive to aluminum and aluminum alloys.
  5. Many universal antifreeze formulae, including those for all makes and models, do not include high enough silicate levels to achieve that degree.
  6. As a result, the anode coating becomes too thin to offer passivity, resulting in pitting and rapid corrosion, as well as other problems.

What is Organic Acid Coolant Technology?

Organic acid coolant behaves in a different way than silicate/phosphate cooling fluid. Cathodic corrosion inhibitors work by preventing the cathodic interaction between the metal components and the environment. Antifreeze includes metal ions, which precipitate on cathodic metal within the engine and cooling system, generating an adherent coating that prevents the engine from overheating. Examples of inorganic cathodic inhibitors include the ions magnesium, zinc, and nickel, among other elements.

Types of organic acid coolants

Chemically, organic acid coolant differs from silicate/phosphate coolant. Anti-cathodic corrosion inhibitors work by preventing the cathodic reaction between metal parts. As a result, metal ions in the antifreeze accumulate on cathodic metal in the engine and cooling system, resulting in the formation of an adhering layer. Magnesium, zinc, and nickel ions are examples of inorganic cathodic inhibitors, as are other metal ions.

How can antifreeze manufacturers claim their product is all makes, all models or universal?

They are unable to do so. In general, universal antifreeze is composed of 96 percent ethylene glycol and 2 to 5 percent inhibitors in all makes and models of vehicles. Because the product is marketed as ‘all makes, all models,’ it is unable to be customized for any particular vehicle, resulting in a compromised solution that provides LESS corrosion protection than the original factory formula. In order to cover all of their bases, these universal antifreeze formulae for all makes and models employ a tiny quantity of each inorganic inhibitor, which causes corrosion on its own due to the fact that the inhibitors interact poorly with one another.

There is also a problem with the universal antifreeze being incompatible with rubber and plastics used in engine and cooling system components, in addition to the interactions between different inorganic inhibitors.

As a result, combining various types of antifreeze coolants or adding the incorrect antifreeze coolant can actually result in corrosion, pitting of the water pump, rust development in the radiator, and overall cooling system damage.

Using the wrong antifreeze coolant can cause extensive cooling system damage

Antifreeze coolant for all makes and models is preferred by shops because it eliminates the need to stock vehicle-specific antifreeze and the need to tie up their repair bay while waiting for an antifreeze supply from a local dealer. However, if a shop puts universal antifreeze coolant in your car that is not totally compatible with your vehicle and the harm does not manifest itself for at least a year, the damage will not manifest itself. The fact that your radiator, heater core, or water pump were damaged as a result of a coolant flush with the incorrect coolant will not be apparent until after the fact.

Why do shops and parts stores sell and use a universal or multi-vehicle coolant?

Simply said, shops and auto parts dealers do not have the shelf space to offer every type of coolant manufactured by every automobile manufacturer. Many universal or multi-vehicle coolants are a neutral hue, meaning they are neither vivid green nor orange in appearance. Even if the car is only slightly depleted of coolant and you’re using a universal coolant to replenish the supply, the anticorrosive properties of the system are unlikely to be compromised because the system has already been passivated.

Which water to use when mixing antifreeze concentrate or topping off the system?

Whenever you ask an automobile enthusiast the type of water to use for creating antifreeze concentration or filling out a cooling system, they will advise you to use distilled water. That’s obviously preferable to hard tap water, at least for now. The mineral content of distilled water can still be high, and these minerals can react with metal and antifreeze to generate corrosion and deposits. You’re looking for deionized/demineralized water.

Other antifreeze additives

In addition to corrosion inhibitors, all antifreeze formulations contain an anti-oxidant, an anti-cavitation agent, and an anti-foaming agent, as well as an identifying colour to distinguish them from one another.

What determines antifreeze life?

In contrast to ethylene glycol, which never wears out, the corrosion inhibitors, antioxidants, anti-cavitation, and anti-foaming additives do wear out. The kind and amount of corrosion inhibitor used in the formulation have a direct impact on how long the antifreeze will last. By failing to change your antifreeze coolant at the prescribed intervals, you run the danger of inflicting substantial and costly damage to your radiator, heater core, heater tubing, and water pump, among other components.

Rick Muscoplat posted a blog entry on

Universal Coolants

Vehicle manufacturers have been creating and utilizing a range of long-life coolants for about a decade now. They all appear to be different in terms of formulation and color, and it appears to be the only thing they all have in common. There are orange coolants, green coolants, blue coolants, red coolants, yellow coolants, and even pink coolants available for purchase. Automobile owners and technicians are experiencing a significant deal of ‘chemical confusion’ as a result of the proliferation of many coolant kinds available.

  1. More information is available by clicking here.
  2. A decal or label on the coolant reservoir, as well as the vehicle’s owner’s handbook, will often outline these criteria.
  3. Ford and Chrysler, for example, mandate hybrid OAT-only coolants for their vehicles.
  4. Furthermore, if the system is topped off with a different coolant, the colors of the lights may change.

There are three fundamental forms of coolants: antifreeze, glycol, and water.

  • Green antifreeze, the original ‘universal’ formula that was used by everyone until the advent of today’s extended-life coolants, is a traditional North American product. Once applied, the fast-acting silicate and phosphate corrosion inhibitors provide immediate protection for bare iron or aluminum surfaces. These corrosion inhibitors have a proven track record of providing trouble-free service in virtually any vehicle application (domestic, Asian, or European), provided the chemistry is correct. For example, OAT coolants should not be utilized in a vehicle when the usage of a hybrid OAT coolant is specified. Always refer to the owner’s handbook when in doubt. However, due to the limited life span of the corrosion inhibitors, this type of coolant should be replaced every two to three years or 30,000 miles (although some brands now offer a service interval of up to 50,000 miles with enhanced chemistry), depending on driving conditions.
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Coolants based on OAT that have a long shelf life. Organic Acid Technology (OAT) is an acronym that refers to a group of ingredients that includes sebacate, 2-ethylhexanoic acid (2-EHA), and other organic acids, but no silicates or phosphates (with the exception of Toyota’s pink extended-life coolant, which contains a small amount of phosphate in addition to its extended-life OAT-based antifreeze). In order to distinguish them from standard North American green antifreeze, OAT-based coolants are frequently, but not always, dyed a distinct hue, such as blue.

  • Volkswagen/Audi utilizes a comparable product that has been coloured pink to match their branding.
  • The corrosion inhibitors in OAT coolants are slower to function, but they last far longer than those in standard North American green coolants, according to the manufacturer.
  • OAT corrosion inhibitors provide good long-term protection for aluminum and cast iron, but they may not be the ideal solution for older cooling systems that feature copper/brass radiators and heater cores, as these materials are more susceptible to corrosion.
  • G-05 hybrid OAT coolants are also known as ‘Hybrid OAT coolants.’ This formulation likewise makes use of organic acids, but not 2-EHA, as previously stated (different organic acids are used).
  • Silicate also aids in the restoration of surface erosion produced by cavitation in the water pump, which is a common problem.
  • Still a little perplexed?
  • In order to properly top off or replenish a customer’s car, you must first determine the sort of coolant to recommend.
  • However, in practice, retailers do not have the shelf space to sell a variety of coolants for each single make and model of vehicle.
  • Since then, a slew of antifreeze manufacturers have created so-called ‘universal’ or ‘global’ coolants that are claimed to be compatible with any modern car cooling system, as well as older vehicles.
  • What could be more straightforward?

While there are some disadvantages to offering a universal product that is suitable for ‘all makes and all models,’ the advantages are clear: only a few stock keeping units are required to provide full coverage (full-strength antifreeze or a 50/50 mix), less shelf space is required to stock the product, and most importantly: there is no confusion as to which product should be used in which application.

  1. Global universal coolant manufacturers claim that the formulation of their products is such that they are suitable for use with all cooling systems (foreign or domestic) and all coolant kinds (traditional green, OAT and OAT-hybrid with silicate).
  2. Using a universal coolant to top off a cooling system that contains an extended-life OAT or hybrid coolant has no effect on the overall service life of the system, according to the manufacturer.
  3. It is also the same service period if a universal coolant is put to an older car with conventional green antifreeze in its cooling system: two to three years or 30,000 to 50,000 kilometers.
  4. This is required to remove impurities from the coolant and to extend the service life of the new coolant as much as possible.
  5. Assuming that the old coolant was conventional green coolant, the new universal coolant will be diluted and will not be able to provide protection that is significantly greater than that provided by the original coolant.

The corrosion inhibitors in all types of coolant ultimately deplete and must be replaced by changing the coolant on a consistent basis. If you leave the old coolant in the system for an extended period of time, the cooling system will suffer from corrosion.

Universal Coolants: The Ultimate Answer?

For almost a decade, car manufacturers have introduced and utilized a range of long-life coolants in their vehicles. The only thing that these coolants have in common is that they all appear to be different in terms of formulation and color from one another. There are orange coolants, green coolants, blue coolants, red coolants, yellow coolants, and even pink coolants available for purchase. The proliferation of multiple coolant kinds has resulted in a significant deal of chemical misunderstanding among motorists and technicians as to which type of antifreeze should be used to top up or refill late model cooling systems, according to the American Automobile Association.

  1. We’re not going to go through the entire laundry list of OEM coolants and colors here, except to mention that each car manufacturer has its own set of coolant criteria that are based on corrosion protection needs, service life, and chemical compatibility, among other factors.
  2. It is critical to always use the coolant chemistry indicated in the owner’s handbook for your particular vehicle.
  3. It is not possible to judge the chemistry of a coolant just on the basis of its color since two coolants with similar hues may have distinct chemistry, and two coolants with different colors may have the same chemistry.
  4. The more we go into the nuances of each type of coolant, the more convoluted the whole issue becomes – so we’ll limit ourselves to telling you only the information that’s truly important to know about the various forms of antifreeze.
  • Traditional North American ‘green’ antifreeze, the original recipe that was used by everyone until the advent of today’s extended-life coolants, is now available. Once applied, the fast-acting silicate and phosphate corrosion inhibitors provide immediate protection for bare iron or aluminum surfaces. These corrosion inhibitors have a proven track record of providing trouble-free service in virtually any vehicle application (domestic, Asian, or European), provided the chemistry is correct. If a vehicle mandates the usage of a hybrid OAT coolant, for example, OAT coolants should not be utilized in that vehicle.
  • However, due to the limited life span of the corrosion inhibitors, this type of coolant should be replaced every two to three years or 30,000 miles (although some brands now claim a service interval of up to 50,000 miles with enhanced chemistry)
  • OAT-based long life coolants are another option. OAT is an abbreviation for Organic Acid Technology, and it contains ingredients such as sebacate, 2-ethylhexanoic acid (2-EHA), and other organic acids, but no silicates or phosphates (with the exception of Toyota’s pink extended life coolant, which contains a small amount of phosphate in addition to its extended life OAT-based antifreeze). It is common (but not always) for OAT-based coolants to be dyed a different hue in order to differentiate them from standard North American green antifreeze. Orange is the color of General Motors’ OAT-based Dex-Cool. Volkswagen/Audi utilizes a comparable product that has been coloured pink to match their branding. Honda, on the other hand, offers an extended-life OAT coolant that is colored a dark green color and does not include any 2-EHA. The corrosion inhibitors in OAT coolants are slower to function but last far longer than those in standard North American green coolants, according to the manufacturer. The recommended service life (in years or miles) for OAT coolants is therefore generally five years or 150,000 miles. The use of OAT corrosion inhibitors provides good long-term protection for aluminum and cast iron, but they may not be the ideal solution for older cooling systems that feature copper or brass radiators, heater cores, or other metal components. It is determined using the formula. G-05 hybrid OAT coolants are a kind of hybrid OAT coolant. This formulation likewise makes use of organic acids, but not 2-EHA, as previously stated (different organic acids are used). OAT coolants that contain silicate are used in hybrid formulations to give quick-acting protection for aluminum surfaces. Silicate also aids in the restoration of surface erosion produced by cavitation in the water pump, which is a common problem. Many European car manufacturers, as well as Ford and Chrysler, are presently utilizing hybrid OAT coolants in their vehicles. ARE YOU STILL CONFUSED? Okay, so there are a slew of various coolants available for use in modern automobiles. When it comes to topping off or refilling a customer’s car with coolant, the question is which type should you recommend? If you want to be safe, stick with what the car manufacturer recommends. However, in practice, parts retailers are unable to provide a variety of coolants for each individual make and model of vehicle. A profusion of chemicals and lubricants has already overtaken shelf space, leaving little place for the addition of a new range of cooling fluids. Consolidation is something that the aftermarket has always excelled at, and today’s coolants provide for plenty of space for that to happen. Recent developments in the antifreeze industry have resulted in the introduction of ‘universal’ or ‘global’ one-size-fits-all coolants that promise to be compatible with any new or older car cooling system. The primary concept behind universal coolants is to eliminate all of the uncertainty around colors and chemistry in favor of a single basic product that can be used in any vehicle, regardless of its year, make, or model. What could be more straightforward? Not all antifreeze manufacturers subscribe to this marketing philosophy, which means you’ll still see the three basic types of coolant being marketed: traditional green for older vehicles and budget-conscious motorists who want the least expensive product on the shelf, an extended life product that is compatible with Dex-Cool and other OAT-based coolants, and a hybrid OAT for late model Ford, Chrysler, and European vehicles that require G-05 coolant as a standard. Although there are some disadvantages to offering a universal product that is suitable for ‘all makes and all models,’ the advantages are obvious: only one or two SKUs are required to provide full coverage (full strength antifreeze or a 50/50 mix), less floor space is required for stocking the product and fewer price points, and most importantly, no confusion as to which product to use in which application. Global universal coolant manufacturers claim that the formulation of their products is such that they are suitable for use with all cooling systems (foreign or domestic) and all coolant kinds (traditional green, OAT and OAT-hybrid with silicate). In order to provide broad spectrum protection, the new universal coolants employ patented organic acids (such as carboxylate) in combination with proprietary OAT-based corrosion packages. It has been demonstrated that when a universal coolant is used to top off a cooling system that already includes an extended life OAT or hybrid coolant, no reduction in service life is seen. It will be valid for another five years or 150,000 miles. If a universal coolant is put to an older car with conventional green antifreeze in the cooling system, the service intervals remain the same as they were previously: two to three years or 30,000 to 50,000 miles each service interval. The cooling system should be flushed once it has been replaced with universal coolant to ensure that all traces of the old coolant have been removed from the cooling system. This is required to remove impurities from the coolant and to extend the service life of the new coolant as much as possible. The old coolant can linger in the block for up to a third of the time if just the radiator is emptied of its contents. Assuming that the old coolant was conventional green coolant, the new universal coolant will be diluted and will not be able to provide protection that is significantly greater than that provided by the original coolant. Remember that universal coolants and extended life coolants are not synonymous with lifelong coolants, which is an extremely essential distinction to make. The corrosion inhibitors in all types of coolant ultimately deplete and must be replaced by changing the coolant on a consistent basis. If you leave the old coolant in the system for an extended period of time, the cooling system will suffer from corrosion.
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Can I use universal coolant?

Despite this, universal coolants are designed to combine with nearly any othercoolant on the market. The manufacturers of these products claim that their antifreeze may be used in any year, make, or model of car without risk of damage. With a low silicate corrosion inhibitor package, Universal Antifreeze/Coolant is a premium grade ethylene glycol based enginecoolant. Using this solution, you may protect the metals in your cooling system, especially heat-rejecting aluminum, against pitting produced by cavitation and corrosion.

It is possible that mixing various engine coolants or using the incorrect coolant could impairthe operation of the special additive packages, which will result in increased corrosion of the radiator and other components.

What color is universal coolant, and what is its consistency?

In this case, you should use the coolant recommended by your owner’s handbook.

If you only need to top it up, the guideline remains the same; however, adding a litre of a different type of coolant is unlikely to create any severe problems as long as you adhere to the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance plan.

Is Universal Antifreeze Safe for Your Car?

Once upon a time, every make and model of automobile required a certain type of coolant (sometimes called antifreeze). On the other hand, nowadays there are universal coolants available on the market that give a broad spectrum of protection.

What’s in a Color?

When coolants were first introduced, the hue of certain coolants was associated with the chemicals that were being used to prevent corrosion. It was becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish between the colors red, pink, green, blue, orange, and yellow. However, different manufacturers now specify their coolant parameters in the owner’s handbook or on a plaque on the coolant reservoir, making it easier for consumers to follow their recommendations. Simply match those requirements to the coolant available at your local car parts store, and you’ll be ready to go.

Universal Liquid

For corrosion prevention, most traditional green or blue coolants rely on inorganic (IAT) technology, which means that they are composed mostly of ethylene glycol or propylene glycol. The question is, what about universal coolants, or those compositions that promise to be suitable for any automobile of any year, make, or model. There are several variables that contribute to its universality, the most notable of which being organic-acid technology (OAT), which is a highly concentrated single-component multi-metal corrosion inhibitor.

The usage of this more recent technology has been reported to be safe by several mechanics and vehicle club members.

  1. Remove all of the old coolant from the system
  2. Continue with the standard planned maintenance of three years and 30,000 miles. Remember to check the pH level of the coolant on a regular basis with a dip strip. If you reside in a cold region, make sure you check the freezing point of water.

Breaking the Old Antifreeze Habit

The use of a single type of coolant has its advantages, both for contemporary automobiles and for antique automobiles. Classic automobile owners have typically used inorganic acid coolants, such as those that are ethylene-glycol-based and brilliant green in color, to keep their vehicles running cool. Whether you drive a 1976 Cadillac Coupe Deville or a 1957 Chevrolet Nomad two-door station wagon, this is the sort of fluid you’ll find in your vehicle. However, using an OAT-based universal coolant in your old automobile will be perfectly OK.

It’s important to remember, though, that maintenance intervals will stay the same, often every three years or 30,000 miles.

Regular fluid changes can help to avoid damage to the radiator, which is the most sensitive component of the cooling system.

Keep the Extended Life Antifreeze in Newer Cars

What about antifreeze with a longer shelf life? Our recommendation is as follows: We do not propose removing the extended-life coolants from your newer vehicles just because the universal-style coolant performs admirably in your vintage. It is possible to prolong service up to 10 years/100,000 miles with these extended life coolants (the majority of which are also OAT-based), instead of the three years/30,000 mile service that is normal with the old green stuff. Because of the level of protection provided, it would seem wasteful to empty it out before the necessary service period has passed.

In any case, extended-life antifreeze is not suggested for your historic automobile since it can eat away at older-style radiators that use lead-based solder, which might cause your car to overheat.

Is Mixing Dexcool Antifreeze And Universal Coolant Okay? — Mad Digi

  • Avoid mixing Dexcool with ordinary liquid catalyst if at all possible! In contrast to universal antifreeze, Dexcool is a highly refined GM coolant that will not mix with universal antifreeze and was used in a variety of GM applications up until the 2004 model year
  • GM recommends using coolant exchangers to replace the old Dexcool antifreeze in your vehicle with universal antifreeze. When changing your oil, regardless of whether you are using Dexcool or ethylene glycol, check the coolant level and quality of the coolant, or have your trusted technician do so as part of the routine inspection. Any car that uses Dexcool in conjunction with green antifreeze must be flushed more than once to ensure that all debased coolant has been entirely removed, according to General Motors.

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In what manner should gasoline with water be disposed of? The Most Effective Jeep Radiator TJ A car that has water in its gas tank will be ruined. Get Rid of Oil Stains on Concrete Driveways If you’re anything like me, your garage is crammed with of items that you only use once in a while. Included in this is any old coolant. The last time I looked, I had over 10 gallons of unused antifreeze in my garage.enough to fill the trunk of a compact car at the very least! You don’t have to worry about the quantities or anything else when mixing Dexcool with universal coolant; simply shake the two together before pouring the mixture into the radiator and you’re done!

  1. It is frequently used in conjunction with Dexcool Antifreeze, which helps to protect your vehicle from rust and corrosion.
  2. Most automobiles built before 1998 may be able to run cooler using Dexcool coolant, however those built after 1998 may only run cooler with universal coolant.
  3. If you possess a late-90s model, on the other hand, your vehicle really requires a 50/50 blend of Dexcool and universal coolant.
  4. Using a funnel, pour the liquids into the radiator of your automobile once you’ve thoroughly mixed them together.
  5. What is engine coolant and how does it work?
  6. Is it OK to just combine Dexcool and universal antifreeze in one container?

Is Mixing Dexcool Coolant With Green Antifreeze Possible?

Without a doubt it is, and it is done when there are few or no other choices available. The colors of the green and orange coolants do not merge together. When they are mixed, they form a gel-like material that prevents the coolant stream from flowing and, as a result, the engine becomes overheated. This is one of those questions that is often asked later in the process, and in most cases, the motor has been destroyed. There are a few universal varieties of antifreeze that are guaranteed to be comparable to Dexcool; nevertheless, I would like to err on the side of caution and mention what the framework should take rather than wager on a specific brand.

Continue reading if you want to be prepared for a huge automotive letdown.

What Exactly Is Dexcool Coolant?

During the 1990s, General Motors introduced a motor coolant known as Dexcool. Despite the fact that it is supposed to last 5 years or 150,000 miles, there have been problems with this coolant. When the coolant level drops below a certain level and oxygen is allowed to enter the cooling framework, the cooling framework is particularly built to act against corrosion. Corrosion and rust will completely demolish your engine long before a head gasket or admission gasket is ever in danger of blowing or leaking.

  1. As heat builds up within specific areas of the motor-vehicle unit as a result of rising pressure levels inside the unit over time, Dexcool’s corrosion inhibitor not only keeps metal from degrading in its natural condition, but it also helps to prevent corrosion from occurring.
  2. It is for this reason that it is so crucial to inspect your car on a regular basis.
  3. The cost of replacing belts and oil before they are needed is more expensive than the cost of performing preventative maintenance.
  4. Here are some of the most typical noises, symptoms, and signals that your engine’s intake or exhaust system may be having problems, along with their causes:
  • A loud hissing sound that won’t go away, especially while the car is idle at a stoplight or traffic signal (or has been shut off after driving). As a result of a damaged or clogged hose or pipe, this might indicate the presence of pressure inside the system. It is possible that a blockage in either the intake or exhaust system is causing the excessively loud sound when accelerating (or decelerating). However, if it is the latter, don’t be concerned about the safety of your car, since this can occur if there is a build-up of heat inside the motor-vehicle unit as a result of high pressure levels inside the system.

So don’t put it off any longer; schedule an appointment with your technician today (or the next day if it’s an emergency). You will not be disappointed! In addition, when you take your car in for service, be certain that it is in excellent working order. It will be more expensive in the long term if they must remove the motor-vehicle unit to rectify something that might have been avoided.

Is Universal Coolant Compatible With Dexcool Antifreeze?

Avoid mixing Dexcool with ordinary liquid catalyst if at all possible! Dexcool is a highly refined General Motors coolant that does not mix with universal antifreeze and was used in a variety of General Motors applications up to the 2004 model year. Your GM vehicle’s coolant system may be harmed by a mixture of exchange synthetic chemicals, which will violate the manufacturer’s warranty, degrade coolant uprightness, and perhaps cause the coolant system to fail. Dexcool is orange in color, thus it should not be confused with standard green-colored coolant.

  1. Purchase DexCool to complete your supply of universal antifreeze.
  2. Examine a coolant that complies with General Motors’ Dexcool GM6277M specifications, which should be printed on the side of the bottle.
  3. If all else fails, ask a store staff to aid you in locating the appropriate coolant for your vehicle.
  4. Coolant exchangers are recommended by General Motors as the most effective method of replacing the old Dexcool antifreeze in your car with universal antifreeze.

Most auto repair businesses will offer you the option of having them handle all of the paperwork and dispose of the old coolant for you if you want.

Can I Use Universal Coolant Instead Of Dexcool?

Yes. However, in the event that you have mixed up different coolants, make certain that when you take your car to a service, the universal antifreeze is fully exhausted. Non-DexCool coolants will cause Dexcool to gel and create muck, which will result in a variety of engine difficulties, including overheating. Any car that has been treated with Dexcool and green antifreeze, according to GM, should be flushed more than once to ensure that all debased coolant has been entirely removed. In contrast to a fluid, the universal antifreeze reacts and forms synthetically as a gel rather than as a liquid.

  • MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: WHAT IS THE METHOD BY WHICH LUCAS OIL STABILIZER WORKS?
  • WHAT DOES SEAFOAM DO?
  • HOW DO I GO ABOUT USING IT?
  • As a result of a lack of ointment in the coolant, the water siphon becomes overheated and explodes.
  • Is it possible to safely blend Dexcool and universal antifreeze in my car if I already have Dexcool?
  • Dexcool antifreeze flushing is recommended every 150,000 miles, according to General Motors.

Basic Tips For Radiator Maintenance

This is the most pressing issue to consider when it comes to cooling maintenance. If you are using either dexcool (the orange stuff) or ethylene glycol (the green stuff), check the coolant level and condition with each oil change, or have your trusted technician include it as part of the regular inspection procedure. Also remember to top out your radiator at regular intervals or after 25,000 miles, whichever comes first (annually is highly recommended unless your car runs warm). These measures will help to alleviate the problems that might arise when Dexcool and universal antifreeze are mixed.

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What Happens If You Don’t Flush Coolant?

Engine damage is a possibility. In the event that you do not flush your radiator in a timely manner. The color of sound motor coolant is either green (for ethylene glycol) or orange (for ethylene glycol) (for Dexcool). A corroded shading indicates that the rust inhibitor in the coolant has separated and is no longer able to control the growth of rust and scale. Clean and flush the radiator with a fresh 50/50 blend of coolant to ensure that it continues to operate properly. The presence of oil in the framework is indicated by a smooth shading.

This is a lethal combination that will quickly destroy a motor or transmission if it is used.

Thick Coolant Is An Indication Of Good Coolant

The motor coolant should have a thick, smooth feel to it when touched (like motor oil). If it feels gritty, the coolant is dirty and should be cleaned out and replaced with a fresh 50/50 mixture.

The coolant has lost its viscosity (the greasing up and rust inhibiting operators have crumbled), and the framework is in risk of rust and scale growth, as well as water siphon wear if it doesn’t feel like this. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE HOW TO LEAVE AIR IN A TIRE.

Check The Smell Of Your Antifreeze

If the antifreeze smells like it has been eaten, it should be replaced. Additionally, the internal regulator should be changed. If the automobile is overheating, it means that it has gone wrong. Overheating damages the bi-metallic spring that opens and closes the indoor regulator valve, causing it to malfunction. Prior to anything else, figure out what caused the framework to overheat in the first place and correct it to keep serious engine damage at bay. So, is it a good idea to combine Dexcool and universal antifreeze in one container?

General Motors Class Action Lawsuits With Dexcool

GM is steadfast in its belief that Dexcool will not let them down in the future. On this subject, there were class-action lawsuits filed against General Motors, and the company reached an agreement with select proprietors starting in 2008. Customers who may have been harmed by increased gas prices during an economic crisis when it was colder outdoors than it is today, but still extremely comfortable inside your car, should be reimbursed in order to avoid paying out compensation. Darrow, a former General Motors employee who worked on the development of ‘Dexcool,’ decided to take matters into his own hands.

Thanks to the assistance of chemists, Clarence was able to develop a proprietary blend that prevents corrosion and rust in gasoline systems by combating acidity – which would otherwise destroy metal parts over time while simultaneously protecting them from overheating – while remaining environmentally friendly.

  • An report published by ABC News said that the corrosion-fighting effectiveness of Dexcool was such that it effectively removed the need for other traditional coolant solutions.
  • Because the new product was so well received, General Motors pushed automobile owners to do ‘15,000-mile’ servicing when, in truth, they should have been replacing their coolant every two years.
  • It is at this point that the difficulties begin to manifest themselves.
  • When the temperature dips below 50 degrees in a car with a plastic intake manifold (as is the case with most General Motors cars), the manifold will begin to melt.
  • It is widely thought that senior officials at General Motors opted not to utilize better solutions available on the market for extended life coolants because they wanted ‘their stuff’ in every car, as evidenced by several court suits.

The organization was really pressuring clients to come in for maintenance when they didn’t need to and charging them for repairs when there was no damage to begin with.

Main Takeaways – Mixing Dexcool Antifreeze And Universal Coolant

However, there are instances when individuals must make do. When faced with an emergency situation, you seldom, if ever, have an optimal option. An emergency kit kept in your truck is always a good idea, and it is well worth the discomfort of months or years of bother for the one single minute when it is your only choice in an emergency situation like this. Dexcool is an excellent choice for your automobile. If your vehicle is already equipped with Dexcool, it is recommended that you continue to use only Dexcool and avoid combining it with other forms of antifreeze.

Using a vehicle that has been subjected to a prolonged period of high-temperature operation is not recommended if you want to combine Dexcool with other coolants.

Always refer to your owner’s handbook for suggested mixing ratios if you are in question about something.

A decent rule of thumb to follow while ensuring that your new combination will perform well is as follows: In the case of two fluids with different boiling points (for example, Dexcool and straight ethylene glycol), they should be mixed in equal amounts; however, if the fluids have similar properties (for example, both have high boiling points or both have low boiling points), adding up to 10% more of the fluid that boils at a higher temperature can help ensure adequate corrosion protection.

  1. Ethylene glycol is a hygroscopic substance, which means that it has a high affinity to water.
  2. If the fluid becomes polluted with water, it will decompose into a number of acids, which will cause harm to your refrigeration system.
  3. If you are changing the coolant in your car every two years or if you live in a location where there is a lot of water on the roads during the winter months, using a corrosion inhibitor will assist to keep this from becoming a problem in the future.
  4. Thank you for reading and please keep it filthy.

Everything You Ever Needed To Know About Antifreeze And Coolant – The Filter Blog

Given how quickly the weather is changing towards the end of Summer and how rapidly temperatures are dropping, it’s a good idea to give your automobile a once-over in preparation for the cooler weather that’s approaching. There are several elements that should be checked, including the tyres, oil, lights, windshield wipers, and even the batteries. The cooling system of a vehicle is something that is sometimes disregarded.

A well working and well-maintained cooling system is critical to the overall health of your engine’s performance and longevity. Engine coolant/antifreeze helps to keep your engine from overheating and also keeps it from freezing when the ambient temperature drops below zero.

1. What is antifreeze?

In a nutshell, antifreeze is a concentrated glycol-based liquid that you mix with water and use to fill the cooling system of your automobile. Antifreeze, as the name implies, is a substance that protects the coolant in your engine from freezing in cold weather. Anti-freeze also aids in the prevention of scale buildup and corrosion in the engine, as well as the improvement of heat transmission from the hot engine to the coolant when used properly.

2. What is coolant?

Simply explained, coolant is the liquid that circulates through an engine to maintain the engine’s operating temperature range within acceptable limits. The great majority of contemporary automobiles employ liquid cooling to keep the engine operating at its optimal temperature. If you’re shopping for antifreeze/coolant at a store or on the internet, it’s crucial to understand the distinction between the two products. Coolant refers to a pre-mixed, ready to use solution of anti-freeze and water that may be poured directly into the cooling system without any further mixing.

3. How does coolant work?

It is a closed loop system in which coolant is circulated via narrow channels in the engine block and cylinder head, taking heat from the metal, before going through a radiator to cool the engine. During each trip through the radiator, air flowing through it (either from the car moving or from a supplemental fan) takes heat from the coolant, preparing it for the next pass through to cool the engine once again. Engine cooling is controlled by a thermostat, and the latest engines alter the cooling according to the operating circumstances in order to improve overall efficiency.

4. Isn’t coolant just water?

Although each automobile manufacturer has its own set of rules, you should closely stick to them when it comes to coolant specification and anti-freeze concentration in general. Filling the coolant reservoir with water as needed is OK, but bigger top-ups and flush-outs should be performed with the specified volumes of coolant and anti-freeze.

5. Should I worry about sludge in the coolant?

Not right now, unfortunately. If the engine’s temperature is being managed properly, it is likely that the problem is caused by scale buildup or the usage of hard water in the cooling system. In order to guarantee that the cooling system is operating at peak efficiency, it is recommended that it be flushed out with an appropriate cleaning solution and then refilled with the recommended coolant and anti-freeze levels. If you live in a hard water location, it is recommended that you use distilled or deionized water.

6. Do I need to flush out my coolant system?

Keep in mind that you should always follow the manufacturer’s recommendations, although it used to be a common rule of thumb that the coolant should be cleansed and replenished every two years or 32,000 kilometers (20,000 miles). Fortunately, developments in chemical compound technology are allowing for cooling times to be extended to five years or more in some cases, although it is always better to err on the side of caution.

There are items available for purchase that are specifically designed to assist in system flushing, such as Holts Speed Flush.

7. How much antifreeze do I add?

When it comes to dilution, most antifreeze products will feature a guidance on the container, but if yours doesn’t, you may use the chart to the right as a general reference.

8. Can I measure the concentration of antifreeze in my coolant?

Yes, with the help of an antifreeze tester. You can get them right here on MicksGarage.com, and they are quite simple to operate.

9. What type of antifreeze do I need?

Red antifreeze, blue antifreeze, pink antifreeze, yellow antifreeze, and universal antifreeze are the colors of antifreeze available. Which one should you choose to work with? You should consult your owner’s handbook and follow the manufacturer’s recommendations, or you may just use a universal antifreeze like Prestone All-Makes-All Models antifreeze/coolant, which is available at your local auto parts store.

10. What can I do about an overheating engine?

As soon as you see that your temperature gauge has turned red or that your coolant warning light has flashed, you should pull over and turn off the engine as soon as it is reasonably safe to do so. It is first and foremost necessary to check the coolant level, but do so with extreme caution because the fluid will be under pressure and extremely hot. At this point, opening the radiator cap is not recommended, but opening the hood (with caution to avoid any steam) is not a terrible idea. Please wait until the engine is completely cold before attempting to top off the coolant system.

It is not recommended to drive the automobile if the temperature cannot be managed since this might result in the engine failing completely.

Because the car’s heating and cooling systems both utilize the same coolant/water to work, this aids in the removal of heat from the coolant.

Safety:

Ethylene glycol (the primary constituent in the vast majority of antifreeze/coolant products) is exceedingly dangerous, as you may not be aware. It is possible to die as a result of antifreeze poisoning since it can cause significant damage to your heart, kidneys, and brain. As a result, it goes without saying that you must use caution when handling it, particularly when dealing with small children and animals. Animals are drawn to the scent of antifreeze, whereas children are drawn to the color, most likely because it is bright.

Any spills must be cleaned up as soon as possible and disposed of in an environmentally friendly manner.

In addition to dizziness, inhalation of the vapors might produce nausea and vomiting.

When comparing the two chemicals, propylene glycol is far less hazardous than ethylene glycol.

In order for an animal to become sick or die, it would have to eat a significant amount of this form of antifreeze, a quantity that is unlikely to be accessible. The label on the bottle should indicate what sort of antifreeze is included therein.

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