Oil change schedules — normal versus severe service?

For ‘severe’ service, most owners’ manuals recommend an oil change every 3,000 miles (5,000 km) and an oil filter change with every oil change. However, what the owners’ manuals call ‘normal’ operating conditions are really ideal conditions, mostly long highway trips rather than around-town driving.

  • For example, under a normal-duty schedule, the manufacturer may recommend oil changes every 7,500 miles. However, under the heavy-duty schedule, the change intervals may shrink to as few as 3,750 miles. Additionally, your manual will indicate which type of oil to use: conventional or synthetic.

What is the difference between normal and severe maintenance?

Car Care’s normal maintenance schedule is based on OEM maintenance guidelines for each vehicle. We recommend using the severe maintenance schedule if you live in an area with severe climate (ex. cold winters), you want to maintain the highest possible value for your car, or your car is prone to repairs.

What is a severe service schedule?

A severe service schedule recommends that things like an oil change, air filter replacement, and transmission service be done more often: either in fewer miles or in less time.’ Foreign and domestic manufacturers create a specific schedule for each vehicle they manufacture.

Is an oil change considered routine maintenance?

Essentially, maintenance is what you get regularly done on your vehicle to make sure it stays in fighting form. Maintenance is something that’s scheduled – like an oil change – whereas service is when you need something specific fixed or tuned up that’s outside of your regular maintenance schedule.

Is it better to change oil early or late?

Trips where the engine never has a chance to warm up completely are especially hard on the engine and oil both. If your current oil has already been in the vehicle for several thousand miles and is dirty brown on the dipstick, though, you’re better off having the oil change performed before the trip.

What is severe service?

Severe service refers to the challenges levied on the valve itself, such as very high pressures and temperatures. Critical service refers to the potential consequences of the valve not working properly.

What does severe Mean on Chevy maintenance schedule?

Select the Severe Maintenance (Schedule 1) if you drive your vehicle under any of the following conditions: Driving on dusty, rough, muddy, or salt-spread roads. Towing, police, taxi, or commercial operation. Extensive idling and/or low-speed operation.

What are some of the items that would require more frequent service for a vehicle operating under severe conditions?

Sometimes driving conditions mean your vehicle may require additional servicing.

  • Repeated short distance driving (eg.
  • Extreme heat (slow driving speeds and long idling periods lead to high under bonnet temperatures)
  • Extreme Cold.
  • Extensive idling or long periods of stop start driving.

What is the difference between an oil change and a service?

For most auto repair shops and convenient oil-lube establishments, an oil change means the oil gets drained out and changed. An oil change service, however, is the changing of the oil; plus a safety inspection that examines the oil filter, cabin filter, a check of brake pads, tires, fluids, etc.

What is a typical maintenance schedule for a car?

Many manufacturers use a 30-60-90 schedule, meaning certain items need to be inspected, changed or replaced at 30,000, 60,000, and 90,000 miles. But if you’re like most drivers, you may wonder if every suggested maintenance checkpoint in your car manual is essential for the health and well-being of your car.

What is the difference between service and maintenance plan?

A Service plan is a plan that pays for your car’s services. The cover of a Maintenance plan includes labour and parts costs of servicing a car. The Maintenance plan also includes components such as the exhaust systems, engine, clutch, gearbox and electrical components.

What’s more important for oil change time or mileage?

Some car experts suggest that the 3,000-mile interval is really for the benefit of shops that change oil, since the more frequently you come in, the more money they make. Still, if you have an older-model car that recommends an oil change every 3,000 miles, you’re probably better off adhering to it.

What is the recommended oil change interval?

It used to be normal to change the oil every 3,000 miles, but with modern lubricants most engines today have recommended oil change intervals of 5,000 to 7,500 miles. Moreover, if your car’s engine requires full-synthetic motor oil, it might go as far as 15,000 miles between services!

What are signs you need an oil change?

9 Signs You Need an Oil Change | Discount Tire Centers

  • Excess Vehicle Exhaust.
  • Falling Oil Level.
  • Increased Engine Noise.
  • Irregular Oil Texture.
  • Low Oil Level.
  • More Mileage Than Usual.
  • Persistent Check Engine Light.
  • Shaking While Idling.

Are You Normal or Severe? Learn Which Oil Change Interval is Best for You

For vehicles without an oil life monitor, it is likely that the owner’s manual contains two maintenance service schedules: one for ‘normal’ driving and another for ‘severe’ driving. If your vehicle does not have an oil life monitor, it is likely that the owner’s manual contains two maintenance service schedules: one for ‘normal’ driving and one for ‘severe.’ And, if you’re anything like the majority of drivers, you probably believe yourself to be ‘normal.’ That’s where you might be making a significant error when it comes to auto maintenance.

According to the study, ‘just six percent of motorists said they spent the most of their driving time in terrible service conditions,’ according to the survey results.

In spite of the fact that more than 90 percent of respondents consider themselves ‘normal’ drivers, 89 percent of those persons engage in driving behaviors that are classified as ‘severe.’ ‘Because of the additional wear that extreme driving circumstances have on vehicle components and fluids, manufacturers issue various sets of guidelines for severe driving conditions,’ said John Nielsen, head of AAA Approved Auto Repair and Auto Buying Services.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, ‘With greater traffic congestion and lengthier commutes becoming more typical, many motorists are unaware that what they consider to be average driving is actually severe when it comes to wear and tear on their car.’ As explained by AAA, ‘Maintenance regimens for extreme driving conditions often prescribe that fluid and filter changes be performed on a more frequent basis, as well as more frequent inspections of certain components.’

So, which maintenance schedule is best for you?

If any of the following apply to your car, we recommend that you adhere to the ‘severe’ maintenance schedule:

  • The vast majority of your driving consists of short excursions (five miles or less in distance)
  • The bulk of your driving consists of lengthier journeys, but it also involves a significant amount of idling (for example, the stop-and-go traffic that is frequent throughout many people’s morning and evening commute)
  • Your driving habits include towing a trailer or hauling large loads
  • Driving frequently in excessive heat (greater than 90 degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Driving frequently in extreme cold (greater than 10 degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Or driving frequently in humid weather.

If none of the criteria listed above apply to you, congrats! You’re just a ‘regular’ motorist.

How to Choose a Car Maintenance Schedule: Normal or Severe Duty

Following the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance plan for your vehicle is an important part of proper automotive care. A schedule is provided by every manufacturer, and it is normally separated into two categories: regular duty and severe duty. Although you may assume that following a normal-duty schedule is the best option for you, the majority of drivers should really stick to a heavy-duty schedule instead. The reason behind this is as follows.

Car Maintenance Schedule 101

The maintenance schedule for a car may be determined by consulting the owner’s manual, which is normally located in the glove box. Normal- and severe-duty schedules, commonly referred to as Schedule A and Schedule B, may be found in the maintenance section, which can be found under the maintenance tab. There is a record of due maintenance items under each schedule, which shows the number of miles (or kilometers) a vehicle should be driven before the owner is required to do each work. For example, the manufacturer may recommend oil changes every 7,500 miles if the vehicle is operated on a standard duty schedule.

In addition, your handbook will specify the sort of oil to use: traditional or synthetic, depending on your needs. It is also possible that the manufacturer may provide a box adjacent to each due item, which will be checked off when the maintenance activities are accomplished.

Your Driving Habits

An AAA survey of 841 motorists was conducted some years ago to assess whether or not they engaged in any of the following behaviors:

  • Drive their automobiles on short journeys of less than 5 miles in moderate weather, or less than 10 miles in cold weather, according to the following guidelines: Short journeys result in the buildup of water vapor, which dilutes the motor oil and has a negative influence on performance
  • And When driving in bumper-to-bumper traffic in hot weather, remember the following: Extreme temperatures can have a negative impact on the performance of your vehicle. Not only may this cause your battery to wear out more quickly, but it can also cause lubricants such as motor oil to break down more quickly. Maintain a consistent pace of less than 50 miles per hour for extended periods of time: In order to perform optimally, your car is intended to be driven on wide highways at highway speeds. Anything less results in increased wear and tear, necessitating increased maintenance intervals. Roads that are salty, muddy, or dusty, as well as roads with sandy or gravel-covered surfaces, should be avoided: Clean air cannot reach the engine because of clogging caused by dirt roads in the engine. Because of this, your engine has to work harder, lowering fuel efficiency in the process
  • If you pull a trailer, have a camper attached to your pickup truck, or transport objects on top of your vehicle, such as a roof-top carrier, you should consider the following: Carrying any additional load, especially on the top, increases the weight your automobile has to carry, which reduces its efficiency.

Survey Says

62 percent of respondents to the AAA poll stated that they drive in severe weather conditions all or most of the time, which was a startling finding. As a result, these personnel are required to adhere to the severe-duty schedule. As for the schedule that you should adhere to, a realistic assessment of your driving habits in comparison to the AAA’s criteria will assist you in determining which is the most appropriate for your car. Be prepared to need the heavy-duty maintenance schedule if your vehicle requires it.

Consult with a trained specialist at your local NAPA AUTO PARTS shop for additional information on auto maintenance routine.

Matthew C. KeeganView All

The fact that Matt Keegan has kept his interest in automobiles since his father showed him that kicking tires may be a good method to discover a fault with a vehicle’s suspension system is a testament to his perseverance. Over the years, he’s learned a few things like coefficient of drag, G-forces, toe-heel shifting, and how to use the bizarre infotainment system of some random weekly driver’s car. As a member of the Washington Automotive Press Association, Matt writes for a variety of print and online media outlets, including the Washington Post.

Do You Need to Follow the Severe Service Schedule? Learn How to Find Out.

So you take your car in for routine maintenance, and the professionals at Auto Select advise you that you should replace your oil more frequently than you now do. What? While you followed the maintenance plan, you took a closer look at the ‘severe service’ schedule and noticed the following items. 1. The majority of your journeys are fewer than four miles in length. 2. When the outside temperature is below freezing, the majority of your travels are fewer than 10 miles in length. 3. Because you don’t do a lot of interstate driving, you tend to travel at a slower pace the majority of time.

  • You’re driving in a region with a lot of pollution, dust, dirt, muck, or slush on the ground.
  • Using a trailer, hauling hefty objects, or a car-top carrier are all things you do on a regular basis.
  • The weather in your location might be either hot or extremely cold at times.
  • Extreme driving isn’t quite what you’d expected it to be.
  • For some of us, the answer is self-evident.
  • Consider drawing a line through your car to determine how often it should be serviced.
  • Extreme driving conditions should be placed at the other end of the spectrum.
See also:  Gasoline shelf life — How long does gasoline last? (Best solution)

Take a good, hard look at where your driving falls on the spectrum.

Just be straightforward.

Understanding why our cars require more regular servicing may also assist us in determining a maintenance program for our automobiles.

That heat can be created by the ambient temperature, but it can also be generated by the additional heat generated in the engine and gearbox as a result of stop-and-go driving.

As a result, fluids must be replenished more often in order to maintain their efficiency under these conditions.

Moisture evaporates from the engine when it is hot; moisture condenses when the engine is cool.

Short travels, on the other hand, do not allow for this, and moisture can accumulate within the engine.

Filters and fluids simply become dirtier more quickly while operating in dusty or polluted environments.

In order to provide good automobile maintenance, it is necessary to address issues before they become problems. And in order to do so, you must first determine how frequently you should bring your car into Auto Select for servicing.

Oil change schedules — normal versus severe service

The frequency with which you replace your oil is determined by your driving style, the type of oil you use, and the manufacturer’s recommendations. MOST drivers replace their oil according to the ‘NORMAL’ service classifications when, in reality, they should be changing their oil according to the shorter timetable required by the ‘SEVERE’ service classification.

See also

Severe service defined

Driving short distances of less than 5 miles in normal weather or less than 10 miles in freezing temperatures on a regular basis is not recommended. Extended periods of engine idling or traveling at a moderate pace for long distances Frequently encountering traffic jams and having to stop and go Driving in a high-traffic area for more than 90 minutesFDriving as a police car, taxi, or for other commercial purposes (Door-Dash/delivery service) or tow a vehicle Driving on a mountain road, whether it’s uphill, downhill, or in the middle of nowhere Towing a trailer, or bringing a camper or roof rack along for the ride Driving on roads that are bumpy, dusty, muddy, unpaved, graveled, or salt-spread is not recommended.

Driving in places where salt or other corrosive compounds are used, or driving in extremely cold weatherDriving in sandy terrain

Additional considerations for oil change intervals

The automobile manufacturer thinks that you’ve used the specified type of oil and the required viscosity of oil in your vehicle. Using anything other than the recommended oil change intervals will prevent you from following the manufacturer’s recommendations. ALSO, the automaker thinks that you will check your oil level and fill it off when it is a half quart or more below the full level mark. If you don’t check your oil level and top it off, you’re out of luck. Driving while your oil level is one quart or more below the full mark can diminish the life of your engine’s oil by at least 25 percent.

Rick Muscoplat posted a blog entry on

Normal vs. Severe Driving. What’s the Difference?

In this case, the automaker thinks that you’ve used an oil of the required type and viscosity. Following the manufacturer’s recommended oil change intervals will no longer be possible if you have used anything else. The automaker also believes you will check your oil level and fill it off when you are a half-quart or more below the maximum capacity. Nothing will go well if you don’t check your oil and top it off. It is possible to lower your oil life by at least 25% if you drive while your oil level is one quart or more below the full mark while driving.

Rick Muscoplat wrote a post on

  • In normal temperatures, driving short excursions of less than 5 miles in normal traffic and less than 10 miles in cold traffic is OK. In hot weather, driving in stop-and-go traffic is acceptable. In sand, driving on sand or salt roads is acceptable. – Driving at modest speeds of fewer than 50 miles per hour for extended periods of time– Towing a trailer or transporting a large amount of freight As you can see, your car may fall into the severe driving category on a number of occasions, even when the driving circumstances do not appear to be very severe. We urge that you carefully take these aspects into consideration while determining which maintenance schedule to adhere to. Although your car manufacturer may recommend that you replace your oil on a more frequent basis, such extreme driving situations may not be taken into account. Because the fluids in your vehicle may be subjected to more wear and tear, prolonging the time between oil changes may be detrimental to the performance of your engine. Ultimately, our objective is to keep your vehicle on the road for as long as possible, and we hope that by dispelling some common misunderstandings, we can assist you in extending the life of your vehicle for many more miles to come

Regular vs. Severe Maintenance

To ensure that your vehicle is kept in the best possible condition, it is vital that you follow the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance plan. It is recommended that you follow one of two mandatory maintenance schedules published by Mitsubishi, depending on whether your vehicle is operated under ‘severe’ (known to as Schedule 1) or ‘normal’ (referred to as Schedule 2) driving circumstances.

These schedules describe the services that your vehicle requires and should be selected in the following order: If you operate your vehicle under any of the following situations, you should select the Severe Maintenance (Schedule 1) option:

  • Driving on dusty, rutted, muddy, or salt-strewn roads is not recommended. The operation of a towing truck, police car, taxi, or commercial vehicle
  • Extensive idling and/or low-speed operation
  • Short-trip operating at cold conditions on a number of occasions (engine had not been properly warmed up)
  • When driving, the brakes are used often. Driving across sand dunes
  • Operation at more than 50% capacity in congested city traffic when the temperature rises beyond 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 degrees Celsius)

This means that if you have any of these symptoms while driving, it is vital that you follow the Severe Maintenance Schedule that your vehicle has in place. You should only follow the Regular Maintenance Schedule if your vehicle is not utilized under any of the situations specified above. Otherwise, you should disregard it. There are no circumstances in which oil change intervals on any vehicle should exceed 7,500 miles or 6 months, whichever comes first. Because of the severe driving conditions across the country, the vast majority of drivers are required to adhere to the Severe Maintenance Schedule.

My Car Maintenance Schedule: Normal or Severe?

An expert from Valvoline weighs in with recommendations on maintenance regimens, motor oil, and lubricants. Drivers in urban areas are subjected to a great deal of stop-and-go traffic and should adhere to the manufacturer’s ‘severe’ maintenance plan. Owner’s manuals are considered to be the Bible of automobiles, since they are authoritative documents that have been painstakingly produced by the manufacturer. Designed specifically for each model, manuals provide information on the vehicle that only the manufacturer can provide.

As a matter of fact, the disparities between the two are frequently compared to night and day — with significantly shorter maintenance intervals for extreme driving.

We have a surprise in store for you if you responded ‘normal.’ Consider the following: the many schedule types and why adhering to a ‘severe’ schedule may be the best option for the vast majority of drivers, including yourself.

Deciphering Maintenance Schedules

The limits for what constitutes ‘regular’ and ‘severe’ duty schedules are determined by the automobile manufacturers. Fortunately, there are only minor discrepancies between the ways in which manufacturers describe each of these terms. Anyhow, we’ll keep things generic and avoid getting into specifics, such as how many miles were traveled or how long the intervals were between them. Auto Trends sought out to Valvoline for expert advice, and spoke with Fran Lockwood, Ph.D., the company’s chief technology officer, to get her perspective.

Lockwood is a chemical engineer with decades of expertise in lubricants research and development.

from the University of California, Berkeley.

Yes, there is a motor oil specifically designed for this purpose.

1. Hot weather driving in an urban setting.

Dr. Lockwood pointed out that a combination of high temperatures and stop-and-go traffic contributes to autos wearing down more quickly than normal.

In particular, the lubricants contained in motor oil degrade at a high rate under these circumstances. As a result, maintaining a regular schedule will only cause your engine to wear down more quickly.

2. Short trips of under five miles.

If you reside in a metropolitan region, stop-and-go traffic isn’t the only scenario that might have a negative impact on the performance of your car. For example, short excursions to and from work, the grocery store, school, entertainment venues, and other local sites may not require a great deal of traffic congestion. Having said that, each excursion of less than five miles results in an accumulation of water vapor, which dilutes the motor oil and reduces its effectiveness. Furthermore, various other components will suffer as a result – you will find yourself repairing your muffler on a more frequent basis, for instance.

3. Regular towing, including a boat, trailer or camper.

The additional pulling force necessary to tow something behind your vehicle increases the stress placed on a car, truck, or SUV’s engine and transmission. Not only is the engine pushed to work harder, but the lubricants that protect it are degraded more quickly as well. The brakes, tires, transmission, coolant, and exhaust systems are among the various automotive components that are affected.

4. Consistently driving on non-pavement surfaces — dirt, gravel and off-road.

Traveling on unpaved roads and surfaces on a regular basis might cause the air filter to get clogged, preventing dirt from entering the engine. Indeed, the rougher the road surface, the harder your car will have to work in order to get you where you want to go. As a result of driving on dirt-covered or sandy surfaces, rocky or muddy roads, and other conditions, it is necessary to maintain proper vehicle maintenance to keep your vehicle in good condition. Temperature extremes and hilly driving are two more factors that might have a negative influence on your vehicle’s overall performance.

Furthermore, high temperatures combined with excessive humidity will accelerate the breakdown of oil and the draining of the car’s battery.

Every manufacturer has specifications for each model and engine that are exclusive to that company.

A Matter of Synthetic Motor Oils

Traveling on unpaved roads and surfaces on a regular basis can cause the air filter to get clogged, allowing dirt to enter the engine and cause damage. Indeed, the rougher the road surface, the more difficult it is for your car to navigate you to your destination. As a result of driving on dirt-covered or sandy surfaces, rocky or muddy roads, and other conditions, it is necessary to maintain proper vehicle maintenance to keep the vehicle in good condition. Temperature extremes and hilly driving are two more factors that might have a negative influence on your vehicle’s performance and safety.

Hot temperatures combined with high humidity will also cause oil to break down more quickly, causing the battery to drain faster. Although the battery may last through the summer, it may be completely depleted by the fall. For each model and engine, every manufacturer has its own set of rules.

The Bottom Line

Despite the fact that synthetic oils last longer and function better under extreme situations, you should check your oil level on a regular basis, just like you would any other fluids. In the end, your owner’s handbook provides the finest advice on auto maintenance; if you follow the instructions, you’ll prevent costly repairs and extend the life of your vehicle. Auto Trends Magazine retains ownership of the photographs. All intellectual property rights are retained.

See also:  Catalytic converter replacement cost? (TOP 5 Tips)

Educating Your Customers on the New Definition of Severe Driving

It’s common to conceive of ‘severe’ driving as being associated with travels conducted in extremely cold temperatures during the dead of winter or scorching temperatures during the height of summer. Severe driving, on the other hand, may be caused by more than just bad weather. It can involve hefty weights such as hauling freight, transporting a full vehicle of passengers, or pulling a trailer, among other things. Traveling on difficult or steep roads, or in dusty or salty environments, as well as the previously stated extreme hot or cold temperatures, or driving in excessively humid circumstances, can all be considered severe driving situations.

  • It should come as no surprise that these conditions or scenarios would be termed ‘severe’ driving under the appropriate circumstances.
  • Most new automobile service manuals, on the other hand, warn that severe driving might encompass even what many of us would consider ‘typical’ driving, such as stop-and-go traffic and short commutes, among other things.
  • As a surprise, regular short-distance travels of less than 4 miles (6 km) are classified as ‘severe.’ In other words, the drive to the grocery shop isn’t exactly ‘normal’ driving; it is ‘severe’ driving on a regular basis, at least if it is done on a regular basis.
  • This can result in moisture collection in the crankcase, which can contaminate the oil every time the engine is started after that.

Rich White, executive director of the Car Care Council, stated in a news release that ‘according this definition, the vast majority of driving will be considered’severe.” There are, however, simple actions you can take to reduce the amount of wear and tear on your car as well as to increase its fuel efficiency.

Understanding Severe Driving

According to White’s remark, the driving that the majority of us perform on a daily basis might be classified as ‘severe,’ but it is important to remember that there can be varying degrees of severity in this classification. In the words of Michael Calkins, manager for Technical Services at AAA, ‘the exact definition of severe driving service varies from automaker to automaker, but it typically involves ongoing operation of your car under one or more of the following conditions: primarily short trips (5 miles or less); extremely hot, cold, or dusty climates; sustained stop-and-go driving; and the carrying of heavy loads or towing a trailer.’ ‘At the end of the day, the concept of’severe’ driving circumstances is fairly subjective,’ Calkins explained.

‘Although we all drive in many of the situations stated above at some point in our lives, what amount of frequency causes a car to be classified as a ‘normal’ or ‘severe’ service?’ In many ways, automakers have effectively rendered this question moot for the vast majority of newer vehicles, which are equipped with oil-life monitoring systems that automatically determine when an oil change is required and notify the driver via an alert on the instrument panel, according to Calkins.

  1. To be clear, this does not imply that drivers should just leave their owners manual in the glove compartment.
  2. One important thing to note is that many manufacturers have increased service intervals in order to make today’s automobiles as ‘maintenance-free’ as possible; yet, it is recommended that preventative maintenance plans be adhered to to the letter.
  3. ‘ When driving a car that does not have many miles on it, most automakers recommend changing the oil every 12 months, even if the maintenance reminder has not been activated.
  4. In the case of ‘severe’ driving conditions, for example, the Filter Manufacturers Council and the American Petroleum Institute both recommend that cars have their oil changed every 3,000 miles (5,000 km) and that the oil filter be replaced with each oil change.

Motorists can reduce the effects of severe driving by following the guidelines for ‘severe’ service in their owner’s manual, checking their fluids and filters more frequently, inspecting other components such as brakes and shocks more frequently, and obeying speed limits, according to the Car Care Council, which has also published its own recommendations.

Extreme Temperatures

The driving that the majority of us do on a daily basis, as stated by White’s comment, may be classified as ‘severe,’ but it’s important to remember that there are different levels of severity. In the words of Michael Calkins, manager for Technical Services at AAA, ‘the exact definition of severe driving service varies from automaker to automaker, but it typically involves the continued operation of your car under one or more of the following conditions: primarily short trips (5 miles or less); extremely hot, cold, or dusty climates; sustained stop-and-go driving; and the transporting of heavy loads or towing a trailer.’ When it comes down to it, the definition of ‘difficult’ driving circumstances is fairly subjective, says Calkins.

‘ ‘Although we all drive in many of the situations stated above at some point in our lives, what amount of frequency causes a car to be classified as a ‘normal’ or ‘severe’ service vehicle?’ This topic has been effectively answered by automakers for the vast majority of modern vehicles, which are equipped with oil-life monitoring systems that automatically identify when an oil change is required and tell the driver through an alert on the instrument panel, according to Calkins.

  • This is not to mean that drivers should just leave their owner’s manual in the glove box.
  • For example, many manufacturers have increased service intervals in order to make today’s automobiles as ‘maintenance-free’ as feasible; nonetheless, it is recommended that preventative maintenance schedules be followed exactly as prescribed by the manufacturer.
  • Depending on who is providing the advise, the suggestions may differ as well.
  • This guideline is also included in many — but not all — car service manuals.

Severe Service Requirements

According to White’s comment, the driving that the majority of us perform on a daily basis may be classified as ‘severe,’ but it’s important to remember that there are different degrees of severity when it comes to driving. In the words of Michael Calkins, manager for Technical Services at AAA, ‘the exact definition of severe driving service varies from automaker to automaker, but it usually involves ongoing operation of your car under one or more of the following conditions: primarily short trips (5 miles or less); extremely hot, cold, or dusty climates; sustained stop-and-go driving; and the carrying of heavy loads or towing a trailer.’ The concept of ‘difficult’ driving circumstances is largely subjective, according to Calkins.

‘We all drive in many of the situations stated above at some point in our lives, but at what degree of frequency does a car go from ‘regular’ to’severe’ service?’ Most contemporary automobiles are equipped with oil-life monitoring systems that automatically identify when an oil change is required and tell the driver through an alert on the instrument panel, according to Calkins.

In general, it is nevertheless vital for drivers to comprehend what is written in the handbook and to ensure that the maintenance plan for severe driving is followed, if this relates to their driving style.

According to Calkins, ‘whereas early systems were dependent on time and miles, modern advanced designs examine real vehicle operating circumstances to identify when the oil will begin to deteriorate.’ ‘In fact, many contemporary automobiles’ owners and maintenance manuals no longer include’severe’ service recommendations because the oil-life monitoring system automatically reduces the period between oil changes when it senses heavy-duty use.

When driving a car that does not have many miles on it, most automakers recommend changing the oil every 12 months, even if the maintenance reminder has not illuminated.’ The suggestions can also differ depending on who is providing the advise.

This is also recommended in many — but not all — car service manuals.

  • The majority of excursions are fewer than 10 miles in length, and the outdoor temperature is below freezing.
  • The engine is running at a low speed the most of the time (this is not true on the highway)
  • It’s normal for you to tow a trailer, move hefty cargo, or transport a car-top carrier throughout town

In the case of drivers, it’s basic sense: a few minutes at motorway speeds is enough time for the moisture in the oil to evaporate. Very short travels, including trips of fewer than ten miles when the weather is really cold, do not allow the engine to heat up sufficiently to remove the water from the fuel. Furthermore, the presence of water in the oil results in the formation of harmful sludge. In addition, towing and large loads enhance operating temperatures, causing fluids to degrade more quickly as a result.

  1. The main line is that you must determine for yourself if a regular or severe service plan is appropriate for you depending on your driving patterns and preferences.
  2. Here’s what a fleet manager had to say about it recently: ‘The severe service schedule recommended by the vehicle manufacturer serves as the foundation for our preventative maintenance program because local miles are often more demanding on cars than highway miles are.
  3. Along with the science, there is a little amount of artistic expression.’ Consider your driving habits and make an honest assessment of them.
  4. Some drivers just want to be careful and follow the harsh service advice, rather of taking the time to analyze their driving habits month after month.

The Difference Between Regular and Severe Auto Care Maintenance Schedules

Routine auto care and maintenance are the most crucial activities that you can do right now to guarantee that your vehicle has a lengthy life expectancy. Despite the fact that each automobile manufacturer has its unique service plan, there are certain fundamental recommendations that most drivers should adhere to. First and foremost, your owner’s handbook will most likely distinguish between a normal (i.e., routine) maintenance plan and a severe maintenance schedule based on your driving style and the circumstances your vehicle is usually subjected to.

These criteria, as you can undoubtedly understand from the preceding list, are most likely applicable to the vast majority, if not all, fleet cars and service trucks.

However, you have the option of choosing your auto care provider as well as how frequently you have preventative maintenance performed on your cars.

All Around Auto Repair performs general maintenance tune-ups, brake repairs, engine and gearbox servicing, fluid changes, and a variety of other auto-related services.

Auto Care 101: The Oil Change

One of the preventative maintenance procedures that you’re most likely already aware with is getting your oil changed. The beginning of true auto care is right here. Most car manufacturers recommend changing your oil every 3,000 miles, while new synthetic oil mixes and improved car technology may allow you to go a little longer between oil changes. The maximum number of miles that should be covered between oil changes is about 10,000. That’s for extremely moderate driving conditions, at the very least.

At All Around Auto Repair, you can rest assured that your vehicle will receive proper care.

By combining the two, you can ensure that your engine will remain lubricated for a longer period of time between oil changes.

When you drive, oil life monitors keep track of your real driving circumstances and if you are placing mild or severe wear on the engine.

Top Off Your Fluids and Get Filters Checked

The Car Care Council conducted a study in which they visited hundreds of auto repair shops and discovered that 25% of automobiles had filthy or low engine oil and that 18% had unclean air filters. Low levels of engine oil indicate that you are not getting adequate fuel economy from your current vehicle, dirty cabin air filters indicate that you may be at risk for health problems, and the 13 percent of drivers who had contaminated break fluid may not be able to break in time during an emergency.

See also:  Hyundai Lug Nut Torque Specifications? (Best solution)

When you visit All Around Vehicle repair for basic auto maintenance, your brakes will be expertly tested, and your automatic transmission fluid, coolant levels, and brake fluid will be checked as well as your tires.

For example, did you know that low or contaminated brake fluid can cause pedal fade, overheated brakes, corrosion, and a reduced life span for the hydraulic components of your brakes?

In order to extend the life of your present automobiles, it is necessary to change the cabin air filter, as well as the engine air filter and fuel filter.

Recommended Maintenance Schedule for Your Automobile

The Car Care Council conducted a study in which they visited hundreds of vehicle repair shops and discovered that 25 percent of automobiles had filthy or low engine oil and that 18 percent had unclean air filters. Low levels of engine oil indicate that you are not getting enough fuel economy out of your current vehicle, dirty cabin air filters indicate that you may be at risk for health problems, and the 13 percent of drivers who had contaminated break fluid may not be able to break in time during an emergency situation.

Your brakes will be properly tested when you come in for routine auto maintenance at All Around Auto repair, and your automatic transmission fluid, coolant levels, and brake liquid will be checked as well.

You may not be aware that low or contaminated brake fluid can cause pedal fade, overheated brakes, corrosion, and a reduced life span of your brake’s hydraulic components, for example.

The statement is correct. In order to extend the life of your present automobiles, it is necessary to replace the cabin air filter, as well as the engine air filter and fuel filter. Make a time to meet with us today.

Regular Maintenance Schedule

The Car Care Council conducted a nationwide survey of hundreds of auto repair businesses and discovered that 25 percent of automobiles had filthy or low engine oil and that 18 percent had unclean air filters. Low levels of engine oil indicate that you are not getting enough fuel economy out of your current vehicle, dirty cabin air filters indicate that you may be putting your health at risk, and the 13 percent of drivers who had contaminated break fluid may not be able to break in time during an emergency.

When you visit All Around Auto repair for basic auto service, your brakes will be expertly tested, and your automatic transmission fluid, coolant levels, and brake fluid will be checked as well.

For example, did you know that low or contaminated brake fluid can cause pedal fade, overheated brakes, corrosion, and a reduced life span for your brake’s hydraulic components?

In order to extend the life of your present automobiles, it is necessary to change the cabin air filter, as well as the engine air filter and the fuel filter.

7,500 Miles or at 6 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter
15,000 Miles or at 12 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter Replace air filter
Inspect disc brake pads and rotors for wear Check brake hoses for deterioration or leaks Inspect drive shaft boots for grease leaks and damage
30,000 Miles or at 24 months
Check fuel hoses condition Replace air cleaner filter Change engine oil
Replace engine oil filter Check rear axle oil level Replace air purifier filter
Check transfer oil level and condition Check brake hoses for deterioration or leaks Inspect coolant hoses condition
Check and service exhaust system Inspect rear drum brake linings and rear wheel cylinders for wear and leaks of all wheels Inspect disc brake pads and rotors for wear
Inspect and adjust intake and exhaust valve clearance Inspect suspension system for looseness and damage Inspect drive shaft boots for grease leaks and damage
37,500 Miles or at 30 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter
45,000 Miles or at 36 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter Replace air purifier filter
Inspect disc brake pads and rotors for wear Check brake hoses for deterioration or leaks Inspect drive shaft boots for grease leaks and damage
52,500 Miles or at 42 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter
60,000 Miles or at 48 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter Change transfer oil
Check rear axle oil level Change engine coolant Replace air purifier filter
Check fuel system for leaks Check fuel hoses condition Replace air cleaner filter
Inspect disc brake pads and rotors for wear Check brake hoses for deterioration or leaks Inspect coolant hoses condition
Inspect and adjust intake and exhaust valve clearance Inspect suspension system for looseness and damage Inspect drive shaft boots for grease leaks and damage
Check evaporator emission control system for leaks and clogging Check manual trans-axle/transmission oil level and condition Inspect ball joint and steering linkage seals for grease leaks and damage
Inspect rear drum brake linings and rear whee Check drive belts condition Check and service exhaust system
67,500 Miles or at 54 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter
75,000 Miles or at 60 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter Replace air purifier filter
Inspect disc brake pads and rotors for wear Check brake hoses for deterioration or leaks Inspect drive shaft boots for grease leaks and damage
82,500 Miles or at 66 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter
90,000 Miles or at 72 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter Replace air cleaner filter
Check fuel hoses condition Check drive belts condition Change engine coolant
Inspect coolant hoses condition Inspect disc brake pads and rotors for wear Check brake hoses for deterioration or leaks
Check transfer oil level and condition Inspect drive shaft boots for grease leaks and damage Inspect and adjust intake and exhaust valve clearance
Check rear axle oil level Check and service exhaust system Replace air purifier filter
Inspect ball joint and steering linkage seals for grease leaks and damage Inspect suspension system for looseness and damage Check manual trans-axle/transmission oil level and condition
Inspect rear drum brake linings and rear wheel cylinders for wear and leaks of all wheels
97,500 Miles or at 78 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter
105,000 Miles or at 84 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter
Inspect disc brake pads and rotors for wear Check brake hoses for deterioration for leaks
Replace timing belt Replace air purifier filter
Inspect drive shaft boots for grease leaks and damage Replace spark plugs, iridium-tipped type
112,500 Miles or at 90 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter
120,000 Miles or at 96 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter Change transfer oil
Change engine coolant Inspect coolant hoses condition Check fuel system for leaks
Check fuel hoses condition Replace air cleaner filter Check rear axle oil level
Check and service exhaust system Inspect disc brake pads and rotors for wear Check brake hoses for deterioration or leaks
Inspect drive shaft boots for grease leaks and damage Inspect and adjust intake and exhaust valve clearance Inspect suspension system for looseness and damage
Check manual trans-axle/transmission oil level and condition Check evaporator emission control system for leaks and clogging Inspect ball joint and steering linkage seals for grease leaks and damage
Replace air purifier filter Inspect rear drum brake linings and rear wheel cylinders for wear and leaks of all wheels Check drive belts condition
127,500 Miles or at 102 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter
135,000 Miles or at 108 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter Replace air purifier filter
Inspect disc brake pads and rotors for wear Check brake hoses for deterioration or leaks Inspect drive shaft boots for grease leaks and damage
142,500 Miles or at 114 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter
150,000 Miles or at 120 months
Change engine oil Replace engine oil filter Change engine coolant
Replace air cleaner filter Check drive belts condition Check fuel hoses condition
Check rear axle oil level Inspect coolant hoses condition Replace air purifier filter
Check transfer oil level and condition Check brake hoses for deterioration or leaks Inspect disc brake pads and rotors for wear
Inspect and adjust intake and exhaust valve clearance Check brake hoses for deterioration or leaks Inspect suspension system for looseness and damage
Check manual trans-axle/transmission oil level and condition Check and service exhaust system Inspect ball joint and steering linkage seals for grease leaks and damage
Inspect rear drum brake linings and rear wheel cylinders for wear and leaks of all wheels

Chevrolet Recommended Maintenance Schedule

Recommendations for Service: The service recommendations included in this booklet are intended to be used as a reference to ensure that your vehicle continues to operate in excellent working order. Based on typical day-to-day driving situations, the information supplied is accurate. If you’re driving in bad weather, you’ll have to schedule additional or more frequent servicing intervals. The following are examples of severe conditions: Towing a trailer is a common occurrence. When working in mountainous terrain, it’s important to be prepared.

  1. Traffic in the city is stop-and-go.
  2. Please refer to the owner’s handbook of your vehicle for information on factory-specific servicing needs and suggestions.
  3. 7,500Miles 15,000MilesRotate tires if they are advised for the vehicle, and do any other necessary maintenance.
  4. If necessary, replace the engine oil and filter.
  5. Check the engine oil level and the percentage of oil life remaining.
  6. Replace the air filter in the passenger compartment (or 2 years, whichever comes first) Change the fluid in the transfer case (applies to 4WD Extreme Duty) 30,000Miles37,500MilesRotate tires if they are advised for the vehicle, and conduct any other necessary maintenance and repairs.
  7. If necessary, replace the engine oil and filter.
  8. Check the engine oil level and the percentage of oil life remaining.

Replace the air filter in the passenger compartment (or 2 years, whichever comes first) Engine air cleaner filter should be replaced (or every 4 years, whichever occurs first) Automatic transmission fluid should be changed (Applies to severe) Change the fluid in the transfer case (applies to 4WD severe) Brake fluid should be changed (or every 3 years, whichever occurs first) Replace clutch fluid every three years (or every three years if using a manual transmission), whichever comes first.

Inspect the evaporative control system for damage.

Check the engine oil level and the percentage of oil life remaining.

67,500MilesRotate tires if they are advised for the vehicle, and conduct any other necessary maintenance.

If necessary, replace the engine oil and filter.

Check the engine oil level and the percentage of oil life remaining.

Routine maintenance and tire rotation should be performed every 90,000 miles or sooner if advised for the vehicle.

If necessary, replace the engine oil and filter.

Inspect the evaporative control system at 97,500 miles and execute any necessary maintenance.

Check the engine oil level and the percentage of oil life remaining.

Replace the spark plugs and do a visual inspection of the spark plug wires.

Check the engine oil level and the percentage of oil life remaining.

112,500MilesRotate tires if they are advised for the vehicle, and conduct any other necessary maintenance.

If necessary, replace the engine oil and filter.

Check the engine oil level and the percentage of oil life remaining.

135,000MilesRotate tires if they are advised for the vehicle, and do any other necessary maintenance.

If necessary, replace the engine oil and filter.

Inspect the evaporative control system for damage. 142,500MilesRotate tires if they are advised for the vehicle, and conduct any other necessary maintenance. Check the engine oil level and the percentage of oil life remaining. If necessary, replace the engine oil and filter.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *