P0641 Trouble Code GM vehicles? (Solution)

What Does the P0641 Code Mean? Diagnostic trouble code (DTC) P0641 stands for “Sensor Reference Voltage “A” Circuit/Open.” It is logged whenever the PCM detects voltage that does not match manufacturer specifications on the 5-volt reference circuit.

  • Cause of P0641 Trouble Code GM vehicles GM has identified the cause of the P0641 to be a chaffed wire in the ECM wiring harness. The chaffing occurs because the ECM wiring harness is rubbing on the ECM bracket.

How do I fix code P0641?

Remember that shorted circuits likely cause a blown fuse. Check the sensor system related to the connectors and wiring harness. Repair or replace any damaged and burnt connectors and components. Next, connect your diagnostic scanner to the vehicle’s diagnostic connector, get all stored trouble codes too.

How is P0641 diagnosed?

Easy Diagnosis Of Engine Error OBD Code P0641 To diagnose this code, you need diagnostic scanner and a digital volt/ohmmeter. Determine the location and function of the sensor in question. Check system fuses and fusible links with the circuit under a full load and blown fuses should be replaced.

What causes code P0641?

P0641 code is logged whenever the PCM detects voltage that does not match manufacturer specifications on the 5-volt reference circuit. Rail 1 feeds the Engine Oil Pressure Sensor, the Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor, the A/C refrigerant pressure sensor, the Exhaust Pressure Differential sensor, the Camshaft Position Sensor.

How do I fix error code P2227?

Here are some ways with the help of which you will be able to correct the OBD Code P2227:

  1. Make sure to mend the faulty engine control module.
  2. It is essential to restore the flawed barometric air pressure sensor.
  3. Repair or replace the quirky mass airflow sensor.
  4. The MAP sensor should be restored to working order.

What is reference voltage automotive?

A reference voltage is sent to the sensor from the on-board computer. The sensor’s resistance decreases as the engine increases. The temperature of the vehicle can be determined by the computer. When the engine is at operating temperature.

What does circuit low mean?

OBD Code P0642 – Sensor Reference Voltage ‘A’ Circuit Low This code means that the powertrain control module (PCM) has detected a low reference voltage signal for a particular sensor that has been given the designation ‘A’.

Why do cars have a 5 volt reference?

The foundational concept is simple: a 5-volt reference flows through a sensor containing a resistance that varies according to changes in temperature, pressure or position. Due to this variable resistance, the signal return voltage to the ECM is always less than the reference voltage.

How a bad circuit ground can affect a sensor reference voltage?

Poor computer and/or sensor grounds can cause higher-than-normal sensor voltages and false trouble codes. In many cases, the bad ground prevents the computer or sensor from pulling a voltage signal down to or near ground zero.

P0641 Sensor Reference Voltage A Circuit Open

Author: Stephen DarbyASE Certified TechnicianSensor Reference Voltage ‘A’ Circuit Is Currently Unavailable

What does that mean?

This diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is a general powertrain code, which means that it applies to any cars that are equipped with the OBD-II diagnostic system. Despite the fact that they are general, the particular repair processes may differ based on the make and model. It is possible to locate a recorded P0641 code, which indicates that the powertrain control module (PCM) has identified an open circuit for a certain sensor, which in this case is denoted as ‘A.’ It is possible to swap the phrase open for the term missing while diagnosing an OBD-II code.

This code will nearly always be followed by a sensor code that is more particular to the sensor.

  • Consult a reputable automotive information source (All Data DIY is a fantastic choice) to establish the sensor position (and function) as it corresponds to the car in issue, and then follow the instructions on the screen.
  • It goes without saying that you will need to diagnose and repair any other sensor codes before you can diagnose and fix the P0641 – but bear in mind that the open ‘A’ circuit is the cause of the problem.
  • There should also be a signal from the ground.
  • When pressure, temperature, or speed are raised, sensor resistance reduces, and vice versa when these factors are decreased.
  • If the PCM does not receive this input voltage signal, the circuit is regarded to be open, and the P0641 code is recorded in the memory.
  • As a result, you should wait for the PCM to reach ready mode before declaring any repair to have been successful.
  • If the PCM enters ready mode, this indicates that the repair was a success.

SeveritySymptoms

The severity of a stored P0641 is determined by which sensor circuit is experiencing an open condition at the time of the storage.

Before determining the severity of a stored code, it is necessary to take into account other stored codes. Symptoms of a P0641 error code include the following:

  • A failure to switch between sport and economy modes while the gearbox is engaged
  • Failures in the transmission shifting mechanism
  • Transmission engagement is delayed (or does not occur at all). When the transmission is not able to move between all-wheel drive and two-wheel drive modes, it is called a ‘transmission failure.’ Failing to change from low to high gear because the transfer case has failed to shift
  • Lack of engagement of the front differential
  • Lack of engagement of the front hub
  • Erratic or non-operational speedometer/odometer

Causes

The following are examples of possible causes for this engine code:

  • Circuits and/or connections that are open
  • Fuses and/or fusible links that are defective or have blown
  • A faulty power relay in the system
  • The sensor is faulty

Diagnostic and Repair Procedures

When diagnosing a stored code P0641, I would require access to a diagnostic scanner, a digital volt/ohmmeter (DVOM), and a reliable vehicle information source to complete the task (like All Data DIY). An oscilloscope that can be carried about with you may also be useful in certain situations. Make use of your vehicle’s information source to discover the placement and function of the sensor in issue as it applies to your specific vehicle’s configuration. When the circuit is fully loaded, inspect the fuses and fusible links in the system.

  1. Fused should be changed as soon as possible, keeping in mind that a shorted circuit is most likely the source of the blown fuse.
  2. – It may be necessary to repair or replace damaged or burned wire, connections, and other components.
  3. They are written down, together with any relevant freeze frame data, because this information may be useful if it turns out that the code is intermittent.
  4. After ensuring that all system fuses are in good working order and the code has been successfully reset, use the DVOM to check for reference voltage and ground signals at the sensor in issue.
  5. After confirming that the voltage and ground signals are present on the sensor connector, proceed with the resistance and continuity tests on the sensor itself.
  6. Sensors that do not meet these specifications should be replaced.
  7. To determine if there is no reference voltage signal at the sensor, detach all associated controllers and utilize a digital voltage oscilloscope (DVOM) to measure circuit resistance and continuity between sensor and PCM.
  8. Using an oscilloscope to view live data from an electromagnetic sensor that is receiving a reciprocating signal is recommended.
  9. Additional diagnostic observations include:
  • This sort of code is typically used to offer support for a more particular piece of code. It is usual for a stored code P0641 to be connected with the drivetrain.

Related DTC Discussions

  • P0641 is a numeric code. I’m getting a p0641 code on my code reader right now. I recently had the engine oil pressure switch changed since it had been wet approximately three weeks ago, but I was still able to drive the car. Now, just the other day on my way to work, my instrument panel displayed a slew of different messages. Engine performance has been reduced throughout the servicing. P0641 and P2228 codes were found on a 2015 GMC Sierra 5.3L. Hello there, folks. I’m getting the following two codes on my Obd scanner: P0641 and P2228. Even though I tried to clear the codes, as soon as I drove the car at high speeds, the codes appear again (just the P0641 this time
  • At other times, the P2228 was also displayed). My truck’s engine has a rough idle and occasionally stalls when the following codes are displayed: 2007 Chevrolet Suburban P0641 P1682 – Reduced Engine Power Making sense of the feared Reduced Engine Power situation, as well as Stabiltrak and traction control warnings, is a difficult undertaking. A three-day-old incident occurred while traveling up a steep canyon road when the initial strike was triggered. I shut off the car and let it sit for a few minutes before turning it back on and making it to my destination safely. Chevrolet 2500 with 6.0-liter gasoline engine, P0641 I fried something in my new vehicle, and now it won’t start and won’t operate under any circumstances. I’m literally shaking with excitement. This infant cost six thousand dollars. It happened just after I installed my new kit. I had an Exon concealed light kit that I removed from the vehicle. My second chevrolet, a 1500, had a spike in power electric current from the battery that looked like a saw blade an inch long
  • 2008 Impala SS 5.3, won’t start, P0641
  • Because I was checking spark on cyl-6 with a spark-gap tester and using a bolt on the engine that appeared to have a decent ground, I ended up with this problem. I blame myself. During the test, I performed a 5- to 7-second start and verified the spark, which revealed a healthy spark, but the engine shut down before I could collect the codes
  • 2009 Chevrolet Silverado codes p0641, p06A6, and p069EI The check engine light is illuminated on my 2009 Chevrolet Silverado. Upon further examination, the codes are as follows: p0641 (5 volt reference voltage wrong), p06A6, and p069E. (Fuel pump control module requested MIL illumination). These codes were also shown as pending once again. Is it possible that someone has seen all of these codes before? My 2003 Duramax has a P0641 code on it. It is in limp mode and has a P0641 code on my 2003 GMC Sierra 2500HD diesel 6.6 duramax. I have no idea what this code means. Please assist me
  • 06 WHAT IS CHEVROLET IMPALA P0641 CODEP0641 IF YOU DO NOT KNOW WHAT THE PART IS? Honda Brio Error Codes P0641 and P0651 Do the error codes P0641 and P0651 have anything to do with the headlights on my car? When my automobile is in motion, the headlights fade.

Need more help with a p0641 code?

If you still need assistance with the P0641 error code, please ask your issue in one of our FREE vehicle repair discussion boards.

Please keep in mind that this material is being provided solely for informational reasons. It is not meant to be used as repair advice, and we are not liable for any actions you take in relation to any vehicle. All of the information on this website is protected by intellectual property rights.

P0641 Trouble Code GM vehicles

GM has published service bulletin P11067B to fix a P0641 Trouble Code GM vehicle on the cars mentioned below that has been identified. An engine Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) will illuminate, a Reduced Power Mode message will appear on the dash, and a P0641 Poor Performance/Shifts fault code will be logged when this problem occurs.

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Vehicles affected by service bulletinP11067B:

The 3.6L engine in the Chevrolet Equinox is available from 2013 to 2017. (RPO LFX) 3.6L Engine in the GMC Terrain from 2013-2017 model years (RPO LFX)

Cause of P0641 Trouble Code GM vehicles

GM has determined that a chaffed wire in the ECM wiring harness is the source of the P0641 error code. The chaffing happens as a result of the ECM wiring harness rubbing against the ECM mounting bracket.

Inspect ECM wiring harness

Locate the wire harness bundle from connection X1 at the ECM by referring to the picture provided here. Follow the harness all the way down to the point where it may come into touch with the ECM mounting bracket. Then look for symptoms of rubbing through or chaffing on the wiring harness itself. Wires and insulation that have been damaged should be repaired using appropriate materials. Then, using woven polyester electrical tape and any other form of anti-abrasion tape, wrap the patch around the wire.

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Error Code P0641: Sensor Reference Voltage A Circuit Open

Sensor Reference Voltage A Circuit Open is defined as the cause of Error Code P0641. The fact that this is a generic trouble code means that it is applicable to any vehicle equipped with the OBD-II system, particularly those manufactured from 1996 to the present. Naturally, the definition, troubleshooting, and repairs differ depending on the make, model, and power configuration of the device in question. An open circuit for a specific sensor, designated as ‘A,’ has been detected by the PCM (powertrain control module, also known as ECM or engine control module in other vehicle makes), and the error code P0641 has been stored as a result of this detection.

  1. In addition, this code is nearly always accompanied by a more particular sensor code.
  2. In order to determine the location (as well as the function) of that sensor, make sure you consult with your reliable vehicle source information first.
  3. In order to diagnose and repair Error Code P0641, you must first diagnose and repair other sensor codes.
  4. The reference voltage (typically 5V) is applied to the sensor in question through a switched circuit (which is activated when the key is depressed).
  5. The sensor can be either variable resistance or electromagnetic in nature, and it is responsible for completing a certain circuit.
  6. As the resistance of the sensor changes in response to the environment, it provides an input voltage signal to the PCM.
  7. It is possible that the Check Engine light will not illuminate until after several drive cycles in certain vehicles.
  8. After the repairs are completed, just remove the code from the computer and operate the car normally.

It is a good sign if the PCM enters readiness mode after the repair has been completed successfully. If, on the other hand, the code is reset, it means that the PCM was unable to enter readiness mode and that you must continue with your diagnosis.

Common Symptoms

The severity of this code, as well as the degree of the open state, determines the symptoms that appear. Some of the most prevalent symptoms associated with this code are as follows:

  • The severity of this code, as well as the degree of the open state, influence the symptoms that appear. Common symptoms associated with this code are as follows:

Possible Causes

There are a variety of factors that contribute to this code, including:

  • Circuits and connections are not closed
  • They are open. The system power relay has failed. Fuses and fusible linkages that have blown or are faulty
  • Sensor that is not working properly

How to Check

In the same way as diagnosing the majority of other error codes does, diagnosing this code requires the use of a diagnostic scanner, DVOM (digital volt/ohmmeter), and accurate vehicle source information. The use of a portable oscilloscope can be quite beneficial in some situations. For help locating and understanding the operation of the sensor in question, go to the vehicle’s onboard information system. Examine the system fuses and fusible links while the circuit is operating at maximum capacity.

  • Any fuses that have blown must be replaced.
  • Examine the sensor system and its connections to the connectors and wire harnesses.
  • After that, connect your diagnostic scanner to the vehicle’s diagnostic connection and obtain a list of all previously stored issue codes.
  • After that, clear the code and then take the car for a test drive to check whether the vehicle returns to normal.
  • When it comes to the sensor connector, you may typically anticipate 5V and a common ground to be present.
  • For more particular information, you might turn to the car information source once again.
  • The sensor should be disconnected from any relevant controllers and the DVOM should be used to check for circuit resistance and continuity between the PCM and the sensor if there is no reference voltage signal available at the sensor.
  • Make certain that you pay particular attention to any faults or circuits that are entirely open throughout your inspection.

How to Fix

  • Fuse replacement when they have blown
  • Repair or replacement of components or connections that have been damaged or burned
  • Circuits that are open or shorted are repaired or replaced.

In most cases, Error Code P0641 serves as a support code for a more particular error code. Furthermore, this problem is frequently related with the drive train.

Solution of OBD Code Error P0641

P0641 Acura OBD Error Code P0641 Honda OBD Error Code P0641 Mitsubishi OBD Error Code
P0641 Audi OBD Error Code P0641 Hyundai OBD Error Code P0641 Nissan OBD Error Code
P0641 BMW OBD Error Code P0641 Infiniti OBD Error Code P0641 Porsche OBD Error Code
P0641 Buick OBD Error Code P0641 Jaguar OBD Error Code P0641 Saab OBD Error Code
P0641 Cadillac OBD Error Code P0641 Jeep OBD Error Code P0641 Scion OBD Error Code
P0641 Chevrolet OBD Error Code P0641 Kia OBD Error Code P0641 Subaru OBD Error Code
P0641 Chrysler OBD Error Code P0641 Lexus OBD Error Code P0641 Toyota OBD Error Code
P0641 Dodge OBD Error Code P0641 Lincoln OBD Error Code P0641 Vauxhall OBD Error Code
P0641 Ford OBD Error Code P0641 Mazda OBD Error Code P0641 Volkswagen OBD Error Code
P0641 GMC OBD Error Code P0641 Mercedes OBD Error Code P0641 Volvo OBD Error Code

What does p0641 code mean on the chevy impala?

The Sensor Reference Voltage ‘A’ Circuit Open code on a Chevrolet Impala is denoted by the letters P0641 in the code’s expansion. Was it as plain as mud, or what? Okay, so what it’s stating is that the powertrain control module (PCM) essentially gives a reference voltage to the different onboard sensors (in the same manner that a desktop computer supplies a reference voltage to its ports) at a voltage of, say, 5 volts to the sensors. The sensors compare this voltage signal to whatever measurements they are taking and then transmit that information back to the PCM for verification.

There aren’t any noticeable symptoms here, other than the check engine light (CEL) being illuminated and some instruments being turned off; you won’t feel the car lurching or going into limp mode, as you would with some other DTCs.

There are a variety of possible causes, the most common of which are a defective sensor, a wiring issue (a broken or frayed wire is a common culprit), or, very rarely, a problem with the PCM itself.

P0641 – Sensor reference voltage A -circuit open – TroubleCodes.net

Trouble Code Fault Location Probable Cause
P0641 Sensor reference voltage A -circuit open Wiring short to positive

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What Does Code P0641Mean?

Fault code for the OBD II Known as ‘Sensor reference voltage A -circuit open,’ code P0641 is set by the PCM (Powertrain Control Module) when it detects an open circuit in the ‘A’ reference voltage circuit. It is described as ‘Sensor reference voltage A -circuit open.’ When supplying a 5V current to an engine and other sensors, most applications employ two distinct reference voltage circuits to accomplish this. ‘Reference Voltage Circuit A’ refers to the circuit that delivers a reference voltage to sensors that control/monitor the drive train and transmission, while ‘Reference Voltage Circuit B’ refers to the circuit that delivers a reference voltage to sensors that control/monitor the engine and driveability functions in the majority of situations.

NOTE:Not all sensors require a reference voltage in order to function properly: Sensors that operate on two wires are generally always Hall-effect sensors, which produce their own signal currents by generating a magnetic field that is interrupted by a reluctor ring and transmitting it to a control circuit.

  • When it comes to practical applications, a reference voltage may be regarded of as the ‘power supply’ for a particular sensor, which is provided to that sensor by the PCM.
  • This is because the sensors’ resistance varies in reaction to changing conditions.
  • When a sensor (in this case, the Transmission Fluid Temperature sensor) changes resistance, the PCM interprets this change as a change in degrees of temperature.
  • If an open circuit occurs in reference voltage circuit ‘A,’ all sensors, control modules, and sub-systems that share circuit ‘A’ may be impacted; however, code P0641 is frequently accompanied by additional codes that limit down the broad region in which the open circuit is present.

However, when code P0641 is present, regardless of whether or not additional codes are displayed, it always indicates that there is an open circuit in reference voltage circuit ‘A.’ Remember that while this code will be saved on the first failure cycle in certain programs, other applications may take numerous failure cycles before the code is set and a warning light is flashed in other applications.

The picture below depicts the usual appearance of cabling that has been rubbed against engine components and become frayed.

What are the common causes of code P0641?

There are several possible causes for code P0641, including the following.

  • Wiring and/or connections that have been damaged, burned, shorted, disconnected, or corroded
  • Sensors that are not functioning properly
  • Control modules that are not functioning properly
  • In contrast to the majority of other codes, a faulty PCM is a genuine possibility.

What are the symptoms of code P0641?

When the reference voltage circuit ‘A’ is connected to the transmission or drive train, the following symptoms may manifest themselves:

  • It is possible that the gearbox will not shift at all, or that gearshifts would be violent, delayed, inconsistent, and unexpected. It is not permitted to switch between pre-programmed transmission modes. It is possible that the transmission will not shift between 2WD and AWD modes. It is possible that the transfer scenario will not move between high and low ranges. It is possible that FWD hubs will not engage. The speedometer and odometer may operate in an irregular manner, or they may not function at all. It is possible that the front or central differentials will not engage.

NOTE:Be aware that the severity of one or more symptoms may vary depending on the application as well as the specific sensor/control module(s) that have been damaged by the open circuit.

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How do you troubleshoot code P0641?

BECAUSE many applications need numerous drive cycles with a defect (code P0641) present before a warning light is activated, it is critical to enable the PCM to enter ‘Readiness Mode’ before a code correction can be judged successful. For this reason, it is critical to clear all codes after each repair step and to drive the car normally before rescanning to check if the code reappears once the repair is completed. If the PCM does not enter ‘Readiness Mode’ after repairs are completed, the defect is still there; on the other hand, if the PCM does enter ‘Readiness Mode’ after repairs are completed, the repair can be regarded a success.

  • When none of the diagnostic/repair information offered here fails to address the problem and an oscilloscope and reference data are not available, the vehicle should be sent to a dealer or other qualified repair facility for expert diagnosis and repairs.
  • This information may be useful if an intermittent defect is subsequently discovered and is determined to be the cause.
  • Those codes that occur after P0641 will be stored as a result of P0641; however, codes that occur before P0641 may have caused or contributed to P0641, and as a result, these codes must be explored and resolved before attempting to diagnose P0641.
  • Because manufacturers do not always adhere to industry standards when labeling components, circuits, and sensors, consult the manual to discover which sensors, control modules, and systems are served by reference voltage circuit ‘A’ if there are no other codes available.
  • Take special care to find any system grounds, as well as any ground connection points connected to reference voltage circuit ‘A,’ as loss of ground is a typical source of open circuits.
  • In addition, be sure to look into the link between code P0641 and any codes that come before it, because resolving these codes may result in the resolution of code P0641 as well.
  • Begin by doing a complete visual check of all essential wiring, and be sure to locate and inspect any associated fuses and fusible connections throughout the process.

Replace blown fuses with identical counterparts.

Nonetheless, look for evidence of damage in all of your wiring.

Make any necessary repairs or replacements to the wiring.

Refer to the SPECIAL NOTES section at the beginning of the Troubleshooting section for further information.

Make certain, however, that all relevant sensors are disconnected from the PCM and other control modules in order to avoid damage to one or more control modules during this procedure.

If it does not, the PCM should be replaced.

However, it is important to note that this test should be carried out with either KOER or KOEO depending on the situation for each sensor.

NOTE:If an open circuit is discovered during Step 4, it is preferable to replace the faulty harness rather than attempting to fix the wire that was compromised.

Refer to the SPECIAL NOTES section at the beginning of the Troubleshooting section for further information.

All collected readings should be compared to the values given in the handbook, and repairs or replacement of wiring should be performed as necessary to verify that all electrical values fall within the ranges allowed by the manufacturer.

NOTE2: Sensors that do not meet the manufacturer’s standards should be replaced immediately.

Physically inspect each connector for the presence of corrosion or weak contacts, and replace any connectors that are found to be in less than excellent condition with new connectors.

Refer to the SPECIAL NOTES section at the beginning of the Troubleshooting section for further information.

However, if the previous measures do not address the issue, consider an intermittent malfunction or a broken control module.

Once the sensors have been tested with an oscilloscope, it will be important to access a comprehensive wave form library for reference purposes in order to ensure that the sensors continue to function properly.

This is because erroneous testing techniques from this point on might cause substantial, if not fatal, damage to the application’s electrical system and/or one or more control modules.

Professional mechanics frequently just remove and replace the problematic wire harness since searching for an intermittent defect in the CAN bus system is similar to searching for a very small needle in a very large haystack, which is nearly impossible to do.

Codes Related to P0641

  • P0642 refers to ‘Sensor Reference Voltage ‘A’ Circuit Low’
  • P0643 refers to ‘Sensor Reference Voltage ‘A’ Circuit High’
  • And P0644 refers to ‘Sensor Reference Voltage ‘A’ Circuit Low.’

BAT Team Discussions for P0641

  • It has 35K miles on it, and it is a 2010 Cadillac Srx with the code P0641i. When I went to pick it up at the airport, it barely started and didn’t go very far. It seemed as if the automobile had a gigantic vacuum leak in it. The engine would barely turn over, and if you put on the throttle, nothing would happen. Every now and again, it would rev a bit higher before dropping down to a very low lopey idle.

Sparkys Answers – 2008 GMC Yukon, Reduced Power Mode, Code P0641 00 Stored

It was reported that the 2008 GMC Yukon had lost its power and that the car could not be driven faster than 35 mph. A large number of codes were saved, however the only one that was truly relevant was Code P0641, 5 volt reference circuit 1, which was symptom 00. In the PCM’s data under the TAC section, I observed the circuit reading changing between 0 and 5 volts, which I thought was strange. While the 5 volt reference circuit 2 remained completely stable. Sensors such as the MAP, FTP, ACP, APP2, EOP, and CMP get reference power from this circuit, which is 5 volts.

  1. CMP is an abbreviation for Dark Blue.
  2. The 5 volt circuit is created within the PCM and is sent to the rest of the system through six separate terminals.
  3. Because the FTP is located towards the back of the car, and because strange wiring difficulties are frequently seen at the front drive shaft, I decided to have a brief check.
  4. Lifting the harness reveals that the harness has been grinding against the front drive shaft for an extended period of time, causing the split weave covering to wear through.
  5. Upon removing the wires from the vehicle and analyzing them, it was discovered that the gray and tan/black wires had been severed by the front drive shaft.
  6. Everything has been reassembled and secured.
  7. I also used a wire tie to secure the harness directly below the clamp on the other end.
  8. It goes without saying that I utilized a scan tool to keep track of the voltage on the 5 volt reference 1 circuit and was able to identify the source of the problem in a short period of time.
  9. An electrical fault would be indicated by anything less than 5 volts and a visual evaluation of the wiring harness would be required.
  10. If no anomalies were discovered, the next step would be to unplug all other sensors connected to this line until the voltage had returned to normal.

One at a time, rechecking the voltage as you go along the line. This code has also been reported to be caused by shorts with the CMP, EOP, FTP, and ACRP sensors and their associated wiring, according to what I’ve read.

GMC P0641 5 Volt Reference Voltage Incorrect – Car OBD Codes

P0641 General Motors OBD2 Code Definition: According to the Service Manual, the Engine Control Module (ECM) detects a voltage out of tolerance situation on the 5V reference 1 or 2 bus for more than 0.5 seconds when the engine is running.

Symptoms

Symptoms of OBD code P0641 GM – Engine Light ON include the following: (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)

Causes

Causes of OBD code P0641 GM– ECM include the following: An ECM failure is caused by a short circuit issue on the 5 volt circuit. Error codes are normally activated when one or more of the following situations are detected: During the sensor 5 volt reference circuit voltage measurement, the ECM has identified that the voltage is greater or lower than intended.

The OBD2 Code Information Be Applicable For GMC:

The OBD code P0641 GM– ECM has several possible reasons. An ECM failure is caused by a short circuit fault in the 5 volt circuit. Error codes are often activated when one of the following criteria is detected: During the sensor 5 volt reference circuit voltage detection, the ECM has determined that the voltage is greater or lower than predicted.

Note:

1. The list of vehicle manufacturers on the right-hand side of the display screen. The GMC makes are represented by the ODB-ii codes that are currently in use. 2. Use the search box to look for any other OBD II Trouble Codes that may exist. In the search box, type in the five-character problem codes and hit the ‘Search’ button. Remember that a particularOBD-II code does not always represent the same thing across different vehicle manufacturers, since there are numerous different manufactures specific codes in use.

This is because not allOBD2 codes used by one manufacturer are also used by other manufacturers.

The material included on this website is provided solely for the purpose of providing general information.

If you have any questions or concerns about the repairs on your car, please speak with your mechanic.

P0641 Chevrolet Silverado

The time it takes to diagnose auto repairs and the labor rates charged varies depending on the region, the vehicle’s make and model, and even the engine type. Nox sensors are used to detect nox. All of the oxygen sensors MAP MAF is an abbreviation for ‘Mapping and Mapping and Forecasting and Forecasting and Forecasting.’ Packs of spark plugs and coils Alternator for the starter motor Booster for the brakes Throttle body Truck performed admirably for the next two months following the above-mentioned repairs.

The motor goes in limp mode.

P0641 chevrolet silverado repair manual online. Fault code for the OBD II Known as Sensor reference voltage A-circuit open, the P0641 code is set when the PCM Powertrain Control Module detects an open circuit in the A reference voltage circuit, which is described as the sensor reference voltage A-circuit open. He stated that he was able to confirm that all of the sensors on this circuit are in proper working order. Even if you are unable to repair it. 2017 Chevrolet Silverado Lt 4×4 with a manual transmission.

  • The control module keeps track of everything.
  • It’s possible that your range is less.
  • There are particular Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Hd diagnostic codes that are used by the manufacturer that are not the same as those listed above.
  • The following codes were found in a 2009 Chevrolet Silverado: p0641, p06A6, and p069E.
  • Each reference bus offered a 5-volt reference circuit for more than one sensor, which was connected to the bus.
  • I believe the root of my problem is the number 641.
  • In spite of the fact that it is a very broad code, there are a number of distinct factors that might cause it to be set.

In addition, I have the code P0122P0449P0463.

Get 2014 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 prices, user reviews, and safety ratings, as well as information on available vehicles.

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They are p0641 5 volt reference voltage inaccurate, according to what I read in the codes.

Despite the fact that there were a plethora of codes saved, the only one that was truly relevant was Code P0641 Symptom 00.

It appears that there is a problem with the 5V Reference voltage for the sensors (code P0641).

This reference signal is typically 5 volts in voltage.

It was reported that the 2008 GMC Yukon had lost its power and that the car could not be driven faster than 35 mph.

P0641 Chevrolet Camaro Description The control module includes two internal 5-volt reference buses, which are referred to as 5-volt reference 1 and 5-volt reference 2, respectively.

Chevrolet Tahoe and GMC Yukon models from 2014 to the present Chevy Suburban and GMC Yukon XL models from 2014 to the present.

In my 2008 Chevrolet Silverado, the motor generates the P0641 code.

Each reference bus offered a 5-volt reference circuit for more than one sensor, which was connected to the bus.

In what situation is the code detected?

P0641 is the fault code that I’m getting on my 2007 Chevrolet Equinox.

In addition, I have the code P0122P0449P0463.

Let’s fast forward to this past weekend’s driving experience.

The vehicle has been in the shop for a few days, and my technician has determined that the truck requires an electronic control module.

P0641 CHEVROLET CHEVROLET Meaning There are two internal 5-volt reference buses in the control module, which are referred to as 5-volt reference 1 and 5-volt reference 2.

The Engine Control Module ECM has recognized the presence of a vehicle.

My 2008 Chevrolet Silverado has a P0641 code.

I recently did some study on all of these codes, and the first four are sensor low codes, as I suspected.

There are general codes for the P0641 engine code for the Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Hd that are provided below that may not be applicable to all cars.

S.A.

Page 2 of the P0641 Code for the Vortec 5300 5 3l V8 Sparky’s Responses GMC Yukon 2008 Yukon A Circuit Opened In The Garage With Carparts Com Code P0641 00 Reduced Power Mode Code StoredP0641 Code Sensor Reference Voltage A Circuit Opened In The Garage With Carparts Com Sparky’s Responses Reduced Power Mode Code P0641 00 for the 2008 GMC Yukon has been saved.

  • Oil Sensor Low Voltage, according to Zero.
  • Reduced power code P0641P0641 P0641 has been the common denominator of the recent issues with 2008 Chevrolet Hhr reduced power codes.
  • Sparky’s Responses By Alex Juan, 2008 GMC Yukon Reduced Power Mode Code P0641 00 was stored in 2016.
  • How To Check For A Short To Ground In The 5v Reference Circuit Cadillac YouTube Sparky’s Responses Reduced Power Mode Code P0641 00 for the 2008 GMC Yukon has been saved.

P0641 Open circuit of sensor A reference voltage

The reference voltage of the sensor ‘A’ is out of range due to an open circuit.

What does this mean?

It is important to note that this Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) is a general transmission code, which means it applies to all cars equipped with OBD-II. Despite the fact that they are generally the same, particular repair methods may change based on the brand / model. When I see a stored code P0641, it signifies that the powertrain control module (PCM) has identified an open circuit for a specific sensor, which in this case is designated by the letter ‘A.’ When diagnosing an OBD-II code, the phrase ‘open’ might be substituted with the term ‘missing’ to avoid confusion.

  1. This code is generally always followed by a sensor code that is more particular to the sensor.
  2. Determine the location (and function) of the sensor relating to the car in issue by consulting a reputable automotive information source (All Data DIY is a fantastic alternative).
  3. To begin with, you must diagnose and repair any other sensor codes that may have occurred prior to diagnosing and fixing the P0641; nevertheless, you must be aware of the closed ‘A’ circuit.
  4. The voltage reference is commonly five volts in voltage.
  5. Depending on the sensor, it is likely to have variable resistance or electromagnetic variation, and it is likely to be shutting a certain circuit.
  6. Because the resistance of the sensor fluctuates depending on the environment, it provides an input voltage signal to the PCM.
  7. The Problem Indicator Lamp (MIL) may also be illuminated, however keep in mind that certain cars will require numerous driving cycles (with a malfunction) before the MIL will glow completely.
  8. After the repair is completed, just erase the code and continue driving as usual.
  9. If the code is cleared, the PCM will not enter ready mode, allowing you to determine whether or not the problem is still present.

Severity and symptoms

The severity of a stored P0641 is determined by which sensor circuit is in the open state at the time of the event.

Before you can establish the severity of the problem, you must first look at the other stored codes. Symptoms of a P0641 error code include the following:

  • Inability to convert between sport and economy settings on the gearbox
  • The gear shift is not working properly
  • Transmission not being turned on (or not being turned on for a long period of time)
  • Failure to switch between XNUMXWD and XNUMXWD due to transmission failure
  • When the transmission fails to shift from low to high gear, it is known as a transmission failure. a failure to include the front differential
  • A failure to engage the front hub
  • An incorrect or non-functioning speedometer or odometer

reasons

The following are examples of possible reasons of this engine code:

  • Circuits and/or connections that are not connected
  • Fuse and/or fuse breakers that are defective or have blown
  • A faulty power relay in the system
  • The sensor is faulty

Diagnostic and repair procedures

The following tools and resources will be necessary for me to diagnose a stored P0641 code: A diagnostic scanner, a digital volt/ohmmeter (DVOM), and a reliable source of vehicle information (such as All Data DIY). An oscilloscope on a hand-held device might also be beneficial in some situations. In order to discover the position and function of the sensor in issue as it applies to your individual vehicle, consult your car’s information source. Check the system fuses as well as the full load fuses.

  • It is recommended that blown fuses be changed, keeping in mind that a short circuit is most likely the source of the problem.
  • Repair or replace any damaged or burned wiring, connections, or other components as needed, depending on the situation.
  • I prefer to write these down, as well as any accompanying freeze frame data, because this information might be useful if the code turns out to be choppy in some way later on.
  • After confirming that all system fuses are in good working order and that the code has been reset instantly, use the DVOM to check the reference voltage and ground signals on the sensor in issue for errors.
  • After determining whether or not voltage and ground signals are present at the sensor connection, proceed to checking the sensor resistance and integrity levels.
  • Sensors that do not conform to these criteria should be replaced as soon as possible.
  • To determine if there is no voltage reference signal present at the sensor, unplug any connected controllers and examine circuit resistance and continuity between the sensor and PCM with a digital voltage reference oscilloscope (DVOM).
  • Utilize an oscilloscope to watch the data in real time if you are using a reciprocating electromagnetic sensor.
  • Additional diagnostic observations include:
  • It is common for this sort of code to be used as a support for more specialised code. It is common for a stored code P0641 to be connected with a transmission.

Related DTC discussions

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