Reuse brake rotors? (Perfect answer)

Brake rotors are exposed to road dirt and grit and that grit can become trapped between the brake pad and rotor, causing the grit to wear grooves into the face of the rotor. A rotor with minor scoring can be reused as-is. However, if the groove depth reaches 0.060-in. it must be resurfaced or replaced.

Is it OK to reuse brake rotors?

Many of today’s vehicle manufacturers do not recommend that rotors be resurfaced during a routine brake pad replacement. They suggest reusing them if they meet manufacturers’ specifications for minimum thickness and runout, are not scored and do not have any signs of corrosion. I’ve reused rotors with no problems.

Can you use used rotors?

As long as they’re in good shape, absolutely. If they’re worn thin, or have been saturated in oil or brake fluid, then they should be replaced. No. New rotors with used pads may stop vehicle, but will not last long.

Can you refurbish brake rotors?

Sometimes your rotors may need to be resurfaced because they have worn unevenly, warped from heat, or become damaged by worn brake pads or pitted from corrosion or rust. Resurfacing rotors removes some of their metal, until the surface is smooth and even again.

What do you do with old brake rotors?

The best option for disposing of your old rugged brake rotors is to bring them to the junkyard. Junkyards are set up primarily for recycling scrap metal. Besides, the environment is better for it. Rather than lying in a landfill for years, polluting the ecosystem, the rotors can fetch you a few dollars.

Is it cheaper to resurface or replace rotors?

Cost: It is sometimes cheaper to replace the rotor than to resurface the rotor. You can get after-market brake rotors for a fairly low price, making it more cost-effective than either spending time doing the labor of resurfacing yourself or hiring and paying someone else to resurface your rotors.

Can you replace just rotors?

Whether you’re replacing both your brake pads and rotors or just replacing one part, you still have to replace them on both sides of the axle. For example, even if just one rotor is worn out and the other one is in good condition, you still have to replace both rotors.

Does O’Reilly take old rotors?

O’Reilly Distribution Centers Recycling Efforts Metal (rotors, brake pads, radiators, etc.) Replacing less fuel efficient and higher CO2 producing delivery vehicles with more efficient models.

How much are rotors worth in scrap?

05 dollars per pound. So maybe 7 cent a pound if they really like you, but 5 cents pound is most likely currently. There was many dead brake rotors and a pile of various aluminum, and other steel parts in here. Something on the order of 800 pounds, not a GREAT load but it needed to go.

Is it OK to change rotors and not brake pads?

It is true that when you replace just the rotors and keep the old brake pads, you save money and time. Even if you can get by with just replacing the rotors, you may want to replace the brake pads at the same time–even if they do not strictly need it. The grooved areas of the pads cannot reach the rotors.

Can drilled rotors be resurfaced?

Can You Resurface Drilled and Slotted Rotors? You can cut or machine a drilled and slotted rotor. Just set your brake lathe to its slowest setting to avoid any chatter. Whenever replacing your pads, you’ll want to replace or cut your rotors, so the new pads can bed-in properly.

Is there a core charge on rotors?

No parts supplier requires rotors as cores and local shops take old rotors to the metal scrap dealer. “Recycle” is not the correct word. When you buy new ones, you usually pay a “core charge”, which is refunded when you return the ones that were replaced.

What are rotors made of?

The brake disc (or rotor) is the rotating part of a wheel’s disc brake assembly, against which the brake pads are applied. The material is typically gray iron, a form of cast iron.

How much do rotors weigh?

A typical front disc rotor on a large sedan is approximately 300mm (12in) in diameter and weighs around 9.5kg (21 lbs).

Replace brake rotor

Because brake rotors are not designed to endure indefinitely, you and the technician must decide whether to reuse brake rotors rather than resurfacing or replacing them entirely. As automobile manufacturers work to lower the weight of their cars in order to improve fuel efficiency, the thickness (and weight) of brake rotors has been reduced as well. It used to be that a technician could simply resurface a brake rotor twice. But times have changed. Today, some rotors are so thin straight out of the factory that a single resurfacing treatment can thin them to the point where they no longer match the factory’s “discard thickness,” which is no longer necessary.

However, appearances are immaterial; brake rotors must be measured using a brake micrometer in order to decide if they may be reused or resurfaced in the first place.

Once the measurements have been acquired, it is necessary to assess the overall condition of the rotor as well as the expenses of resurfacing vs replacing it.

Step 1: Measure rotor thickness

Due to the fact that brake rotors are not indestructible, you and the technician must decide whether to reuse brake rotors rather than resurface or replace them. The thickness (and weight) of brake rotors has decreased as a result of vehicle manufacturers reducing the weight of their cars in order to improve fuel efficiency. A mechanic might readily resurface a brake rotor twice in the olden days. In today’s world, some rotors are so thin straight out of the factory that a single resurfacing treatment might thin them to the point where they no longer satisfy the factory-specified “discard thickness.” If you look at brake rotors closely, they might appear to be in great condition.

For reuse or resurfacing, however, the appearance of the brake rotor is not important; the rotor must be measured using a brake micrometer.

Take into consideration the general condition of the rotor, as well as the expenses of resurfacing vs replacing it after the measurements have been obtained.

Step 2: Measure brake rotor groove depth

Due to the exposure to road dirt and grit, brake rotors can become jammed between the brake pad and rotor, where it can cause grooves to be worn into the rotor face. This is known as a brake rotor jamming. A rotor with slight scoring can be utilized in its current condition. However, if the groove depth surpasses 0.060-in., the part must be resurfaced or completely replaced with another. The technician must determine the amount of rotor material that will need to be removed in order to level the rotor face and eliminate the grooves while still adhering to the machine’s thickness requirements in order to qualify for resurfacing.

if the thickness of the rotor is not sufficient after resurfacing, the rotor must be replaced.

Step 3: Measure disc thickness variation and parallelism

Thickness differences and parallelism issues can occur on brake rotors as a result of improper lug nut tightening, poor brake installation, road accidents, and rust accumulation on the wheel hub. If a rotor exhibits these characteristics, the technician must determine if there will be enough residual thickness to warrant resurfacing the component. As long as the brake shop employs a “on-car” brake lathe and the technician takes all of the necessary measurements, you can consider resurfacing the rotor.

Step 4: Examine the condition of the rotor cooling vanes

Rotors rust, and part of that rust can have a negative impact on the rotor’s capacity to disperse heat, which is a serious problem. The most essential sections are the inside of the cooling vanes and the mating area, which is where the rotor and wheel hub come together. If the cooling vanes get blocked with rust scale, the scale must be removed, which can be time-consuming and expensive to the point of being uneconomical to do.

Step 5: Consider the costs of resurfacing versus replacement

On-car brake lathes are frequently more expensive to repair than new brake rotors because of the effort involved in resurfacing the brake rotor. The process of resurfacing a rotor is divided into three stages: rough cut, fine cut, and non-directional finish application. Installing the on-car brake lathe and performing the resurfacing operation on each rotor takes around 30 minutes per rotor. Assuming that the shop will be utilizing professional quality name brand rotors and that the labor rate is $100 per hour and that brand new rotors cost $50 each (two are required every brake job), it is more cost effective to replace the rotors.

Step 6: Consider the brake noise issue

Reusing old rotors with fresh pads is typically discouraged by the industry since it causes noise concerns and increases the number of customer complaints. The noise is produced by the fact that the new pads don’t lie precisely flat against the old rotor when they are installed. They have “worn in” to the rotor over time. On a microscopic level, your old rotor may appear to be completely flat, but this is not the case. In reality, it may take many months of driving for the new brake pads to break in and become quiet.

If this is the case, replace the rotors at the same time as the pads.

Rick Muscoplat posted a blog entry on

Do You Have to Replace Rotors When Replacing Brake Pads?

Maintenance The 24th of October, 2019. It might be difficult to determine what sort of brake service your automobile requires—and that’s before you consider the cost. Is it necessary to replace your braking rotors when you replace your brake pads? When it comes to rotors, what is the difference between resurfacing and replacement? Is it necessary to get both axles serviced at the same time? Why aren’t you able to wait just a little bit longer before getting your brakes repaired?

The most important thing to remember is to be safe. If you are unable to stop or slow down when necessary, you are putting yourself and others in grave danger. As a result, you should never postpone the maintenance or replacement of your braking system.

When Do I Need New Brakes?

For some auto maintenance needs, such as oil changes and tire rotations, determining how frequently to bring your vehicle in for servicing is straightforward. With brake repair, however, there is no standard mileage requirement for servicing. Brake specialists recommend that you repair your brakes every 20,000–60,000 miles, depending on your vehicle. That is a significant disparity! So, how can you know when your brakes need to be replaced? Squealing noises and a shaking steering wheel are two of the most prevalent indications that your vehicle’s brakes need to be repaired.

Check out this article: How Do I Know When I Need New Brakes?

Types of Brake Service

There are three basic types of brake replacement choices available for the majority of braking systems. The contrasts between the three will be discussed, as well as the reasons why you would select one over the other.

1. Brake Pad Replacement

A common occurrence when clients are researching brake prices and services is that they may come across an advertisement for a brake service that is exceptionally inexpensive. Despite the fact that this appears to be a fortunate find, proceed with care. This might be an indication that the vehicle repair business is engaging in what the automotive industry refers to as “pad slaps.” A pad slap does not constitute a comprehensive brake job, and it does not serve as a long-term remedy. In this procedure, you simply “slap” on new brake pads and utilize the original braking hardware as well as the brake rotors that were previously installed (brake discs).

Brake pads and rotors work together to bring your car to a complete stop.

It is possible that the new pads will not be contoured to match the old rotors, which will result in braking sounds, vibrations, and premature wear on your new pads, which will bring you back to the shop.

It is our objective to get you back on the road as safely as possible, and applying a Band-Aid or performing a fast patch to your brakes will not do this.

2. Brake Pad ReplacementRotor Resurfacing

When clients are researching brake prices and services, they may frequently come across an advertisement for a brake service that is really affordable. Caution should be exercised even if this appears to be a fortunate find. This might be an indication that the vehicle repair business is engaging in what the automotive industry refers to as “pad slapping.” A pad slap does not constitute a comprehensive brake service, and it does not serve as a long-term fix. In this procedure, you simply “slap” on new brake pads and utilize the original braking gear as well as the brake rotors that came with the vehicle (brake discs).

Both the brake pads and the rotors operate in tandem to bring your car to a complete stop.

As a result, you may have braking sounds, vibrations, and early wear on your new pads if your new pads are not properly formed to suit your old rotors.

We at Virginia TireAuto do not advocate just replacing the brake pads on your vehicle. It is our objective to get you back on the road as safely as possible, and applying a Band-Aid or performing a hasty patch to your brakes will not accomplish this goal safely.

3. Brake Pad ReplacementRotor Replacement

The most comprehensive brake service comprises replacing both the brake pads and the rotors, which results in improved stopping power and fade resistance over the long term. Brake rotors, like brake pads, deteriorate with use over time. It is necessary for brake rotors to fulfill a specific thickness standard in order to be deemed safe. If your brake rotors are thinner than the manufacturer’s suggested thickness, you should get them replaced as soon as possible. Some automobiles will always require new brake pads and rotors since the rotors will not be able to be resurfaced on some vehicles.

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Because their rotors are constructed of a softer metal, by the time their pads have worn down, the rotors have already fallen below what we refer to as the “discard thickness” of the disc.

As an alternative, if you’re on a limited budget and your brake rotors are in good condition (above the minimum suggested level) and your vehicle manufacturer does not demand that the rotors be changed when new brake pads are put, resurfacing the rotors may be an acceptable solution.

Check out this article: How Long Do Brake Rotors Last?

Need a Brake Replacement?

You should bring your car to Virginia TireAuto for all of your brake repair and replacement requirements. We’ll examine your brakes and assist you in determining which brake service is most appropriate for your vehicle—and your budget! Make an appointment at one of our handy locations right away!

Brake Rotors: Reuse or Replace Them?

To get all of your brake repair and replacement requirements met, bring your car to Virginia TireAuto. We’ll analyze your brakes and assist you in determining which brake service is most appropriate for your vehicle—and your financial situation. Make an appointment at one of our handy locations right now.

How can I tell if I need new brake rotors?

To get all of your brake repair and replacement requirements met, bring your car to Virginia TireAuto. We’ll examine your brakes and assist you in determining which brake service is most appropriate for your vehicle—and your budget. Make an appointment at one of our handy locations right now!

  • This is the sound of your brakes grinding against each other, which is the dreaded “metal on metal” sound that indicates that your brake pads have been totally worn out. Those metal calipers on your brake rotors are undoubtedly cutting deep grooves into them. Squeaky brakes indicate that the material from the brake pad has moved to the rotor. You may be experiencing vibrations or a jittery sensation when braking if your brake rotors are deformed.

This is the sound of your brakes grinding against each other, which is the dreaded “metal on metal” sound that indicates that your brake pads have totally worn down. Those metal calipers on your brake rotors are most likely digging deep grooves in them; A squeaky brake is caused by the transfer of brake pad material from one brake pad to another. The vibrations or jittery sensation you get when you brake might be caused by warped or cracked brake rotors.

What causes grooves in brake rotors?

When your brakes make a high-pitched screaming sound, it’s the dreaded “metal on metal” sound, which indicates that your brake pads are fully worn out. Those metal calipers on your brake rotors are most likely cutting deep grooves through them; Squeaky brakes are caused by the transmission of brake pad material to the rotor. You may be experiencing vibrations or a jittery sensation when braking; your brake rotors may be deformed.

What causes brake rotors to warp?

The most common reason of brake rotor warping is excessive heat accumulation, which can be produced by any of the following:

  • Brake pad material glazing- Small pieces of brake pad material can move to the rotor and cause glazing. Rotors that are too thin to effectively disperse heat- Rotors that become thin over time as a result of constant usage (and resurfacing during brake service). When the rotors’ thickness has dropped below the manufacturer’s minimum, it’s time to replace them.

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When To Resurface And When To Replace Brake Rotors

Brake rotors do not endure indefinitely; they lose a little amount of their effectiveness with each use of the brake pedal. The type of brake pads used, the quality of the materials used, the speed at which the rotors cool down, the driving style used, and the amount of moisture and road salt exposed to determine how quickly the rotors wear out. In the past, most original equipment brake rotors were constructed with sufficient thickness to endure at least two or more pad changes. In order to reduce weight, most contemporary automobiles have thinner rotors, which may have been worn down to the bare minimum by the time the brake pads need to be replaced.

  • When replacing both brake rotors at the same time, regardless of whether one side is “good enough,” it is recommended to maintain equal braking since any variation in rotor thickness causes the brakes to pull to one side.
  • For a detectable pedal vibration to occur, only a.001 inch difference in thickness must be present.
  • Using a typical bench lathe, runout may also be rectified, but it is a considerably more complicated technique.
  • Rotor distortions can be created by incorrectly tightening the lug nuts on the wheels.
  • The friction between the brake pads and the braking rotors creates a great deal of heat.
  • It is considerably more likely that brakes will fail on cars that spend the majority of their time in stop-and-go traffic, towing a trailer, or driving over mountains.
  • As a result of these hard areas, the brake disc wears unevenly over its surface.
  • As long as your brake rotors are in good condition with no hard patches, cracks, extreme grooving, or corrosion, they may be capable of being resurfaced.
  • If the brake discs are still smooth, they may not need to be resurfaced; nevertheless, most professional brake specialists will not install new brake pads unless the rotors have been resurfaced as well.

Installing new brake pads on a groovedbrake rotor will prevent the pads from making complete contact with thebrake disc, and eventually thepads will wear down and fully seat themselves into the curves of thebrake discs, but this will only shorten the life of thebrake pads by a significant amount.

New brake rotors should be ready to install as soon as they are received by the customer.

You can safely replace your car’s original brake rotors with cast iron brake rotors if your vehicle originally had brake rotors with a separate hub and disc (composite rotors).

Those consumers who are interested in improved braking performance and safety should choose for premium brake rotors rather than the more common basic replacement disc brake rotors.

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Do you guys always replace or turn your rotors?

I had just finished replacing the brake pads on my wife’s Honda Pilot when she called. They were still in good shape and had a lot of meat on them, and the brakes were in fine operating order, with no pulsing or other difficulties. The pads were simply really worn. The rotors were not replaced or turned by me. Should I have done it? mndsmHalfDork 3:43 p.m. on July 6, 2010 My decision to do so varies depending on the type of brake troubles I was experiencing previous to getting them changed. The most of the time, I’ve managed to warp a rotor or three, so I simply replace them.

  • If the brakes were in good working order but the pads were towards the end of their life and the rotors appeared to be in good condition, I would simply install new brake pads and let the car fly.
  • I was certain I was going to die in a fiery explosion after reading a message on another forum (or at least have all kinds of problems).
  • Part of the reason is that it is difficult to locate a facility that does the service by someone who has an E36 M3.
  • I was informed not to flip the rotors on my S10 Blazer since they were not scored, deformed, or wrecked according to the manufacturer handbook.
  • If they begin to pulse, I remove them and replace them.
  • What about the shims, do you think?
  • (Please accept my apologies for being such an idiot.) Another vote in favor of simply running them if there is no vibration or poor score.

If you have new shims, please use them.

I installed the new shims and sprayed some grease on the back of the bike.

On my wife’s P5, I rotated the rotors that had less than a tenth of an inch of runout.

For approximately a month and a half.

I’m ready to embark on a “change all pads and rotors, dammit” brake work in order to see if I can get the pulsating to go away for the foreseeable future.

If the rotors are straight and within tolerances, the most I will do is clean them with some sandpaper, if that is all they require.

It’s merely a habit of mine to replace my rotors on a regular basis.

I just replaced several that were in poor condition and rotated others, and the results were excellent.

They didn’t come out good in my previous experience with having a shop turn them.

if there is no vibration and they are still within specification, I will frequently just slap on a pair of pads, Woody stated.

I virtually never cut them, mostly for the sake of convenience (i.e., less downtime), but also because turned rotors have less metal, which helps them to regulate heat better.

They’re far too inexpensive to waste your time with if you don’t have to.

The drums worked perfectly for approximately a week after they were installed.

Instead of a shaky steering wheel, a throbbing brake pedal was felt instead.

Is there anyone who knows where I can get decent brake drums?

Currently, I’m a little concerned that all of the brake components will be sourced from you know where in the future.

I believe the rotors were out of the box out of tolerance.

While I agree that it is inconvenient to have to do so with a fresh new rotor, I believe he was probably correct.

The drums worked perfectly for approximately a week after they were installed, according to spitfirebill.

Some automobiles have rotors that naturally warp as a result of inadequate braking design.

All of these issues appear to be addressed by a rotor of superior quality and density (such as a brembo).

I also feel that the brakes you buy from a store like autozone are not the same as the brakes you buy from a store like tirerack.

Any shop in the area will charge you $25 for a rotor.

Most front rotors do not cost more than $70 per piece, even for the most costly ones, thus yes.

If I had to replace the rotors with every set of pads, going to track days would become prohibitively expensive.

If a car has 150k miles on the factory rotors, I’ll change them just for the sake of it, but they’re simply a large machined iron/steel circle, so there’s not much that can go wrong.

If you have replaced all of your brake components and are still experiencing vibration while braking, you must hunt for the source of the problem elsewhere.

Replacing excellent components over and over again without addressing the root cause of the problem is absurd.

With the exception of Challenge cars, I always replace the rotors and brake pads.

Usually, I have to replace them because they are so distorted that the fillings come away from the cavities. That’s the one on the Hyundai. Rotors for $12 are the best! I rotated the vehicle once and then reinstalled it.

Do You Need To Replace Your Brake Pads And Rotors At The Same Time?

On my wife’s Honda Pilot, I recently replaced the brake pads on the front and rear wheels. They were still in good shape and had a lot of meat on them, and the brakes were in fine operating order, with no pulsing or other problems. Simply put, the pads were quite tattered and worn. I didn’t change the rotors or turn them in any way whatsoever. Do you think it was a good decision? mndsmHalfDork 3:43 p.m. on July 6, 2010 – It all depends on what kind of braking troubles I was experiencing before to getting them changed.

  1. Because I’ve managed to warp at least one rotor, I’ve just purchased replacements.
  2. All right, now I’m feeling better.
  3. My rotors do not need to be turned if there is no obvious wear or if they are not bent in any way.
  4. A knucklehead has destroyed at least two rotors in my vehicle.
  5. Occasionally, if there is no vibration and they are still within specifications, I will just apply some pads.
  6. I virtually never cut them, mostly for the sake of convenience (i.e., less downtime), but also because turned rotors contain less metal, which helps them to better handle heat management.
  7. What do you recommend: using the new ones that come with the pads or repurposing the ones that came with the pads.

Once again, if there is no vibration or terrible scoring, just run them.

If you have any spare shims, use them.

On the back, I applied lubricant after installing the new shimming components.

My wife’s P5 had a small amount of runout, so I rotated the rotors that had it.

In the vicinity of a fortnight Grrr.

SonicDork Friday, July 6th, 2005, at 5:35 p.m If the rotors are straight and within tolerances, the most I will do is polish them with some sandpaper, if that is even necessary.

It’s merely a habit of mine to update my rotors.

They came out fantastic after I just replaced those that were in poor condition and turned others.

Having a store turn them for me was a bad experience in the past.

Whenever they begin to pulse, I remove them from the equation.

If there is no apparent damage such as fractures or cracking, heat blueing, or noticeable out-of-roundness to the rotors, there is no good reason to have them turned.

No offense intended, but I’ve observed some issues with the quality of the rotors and one pair of drums that I’ve purchased recently.

It’s back to pulsing in the pedal now, although it’s not quite as terrible as it was previously.

I can’t figure out whether the problem is with the front rotors because they are only a few years old and have a little amount of mileage on them.

In addition, are Brembo rotors still of the same high quality as they were previously?

It was just a minor reduction in pedal pulse when I installed new Brembo stock-style replacement rotors on the front of my Olds Intrigue a couple of years ago, coupled with new brake pads, that I noticed.

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A buddy of mine who used to work at a parts store and is now employed by a big automotive OEM advised me that I should have brought the new rotors to a competent shop to have them rotated before installing them to ensure that they were flat before installing them before installing them.

Maybe next time I go through this process, I’ll give it a shot!

spitfirebill wrote: It’s back to pulsing in the pedal now, although it’s not quite as terrible as it was previously.

The Cavaliers/Sunfires of the 1995-2004 season were notorious for warping their rotors without obvious cause.

You should quit driving through puddles and getting your Brembos too hot if your brakes are warping.

The turning problem is a mystery to me.

That implies I just paid someone $25 to make my rotors wear out more quickly and be more prone to warping in the long run.

In the event that you experience pulsation quickly after installing new rotors, it is most likely an indication that the new brake pads were not thoroughly bed in.

Except when rotors are worn beyond specification or deformed, I very seldom replace them.

Autozone has significantly improved their duralast brake components in recent years (at least, according to my sales representative), and I’ve used a number of their pads and rotors with no problems in the past.

Braking vibrations can be caused by a variety of components, including wheel bearings, tie rod ends, ball joints, suspension bushings (particularly on BMWs), tires with damaged belts, and so on.

In most cases, unless the rotors were problematic, I’d just put new pads on them and be on my way.

You should be OK if you have soft brake pads that wear out far more quickly than the rotors.

They are frequently replaced because they are so distorted that the fillings come loose when you bite into them. You can find it on the Hyundai. Rotors for $12? Yes, please. I rotated the vehicle once, then replaced it with a different one.

1. The Condition Of Both Parts

Image courtesy of NutzAboutBolts. Consider the scenario in which you need to change your brake pads. What state are your rotors in right now? Are they reaching the end of their useful life, or are they still in fine condition? To your discretion, you can choose to change your rotors and brake pads at the same time, thereby killing two birds with one stone. You won’t have to worry about keeping an eye on your old rotors and then going through the hassle of changing them when the time comes to do so.

  • Aggressive driving and braking, on the other hand, may necessitate the replacement of your rotors along with your brake pads on a regular basis.
  • In the same way that you inspect your rotors, it’s worthwhile to take a few extra minutes to check your brake pads, as well.
  • Your brake pads should have worn out symmetrically, but you should also check to see that the caliper is still in excellent shape.
  • They won’t even need to be tucked into their beds.

2. The Type Of Replacement Parts You Buy

The presence of another aspect influences whether or not you should replace your braking rotors and pads at the same time, or whether it is OK to replace them separately. And this is true regardless of whether you choose OEM or aftermarket replacement components. If you choose to take the OEM way with one part, the other part may be used indefinitely. This is due to the fact that your OEM part is intended to function in conjunction with the other part (if it is also an OEM part). For example, OEM replacement brake pads will function perfectly with the OEM rotors that are already installed in your Toyota.

If you purchase an aftermarket part, you will be required to repair the other component as well.

If the brake pad material is either too firm or too soft for the rotors, you will experience brake pad and/or rotor wear sooner than you anticipated.

Breaking In New Rotors

If you purchase new rotors, you must break them in before using them.

This guarantees that the new rotors perform at their peak performance during braking. You may learn more about the correct break-in procedure by visiting this page. You won’t have to worry about breaking in new brake pads if you keep your old rotors and new brake pads.

Friendly Reminder: The Replacements Need To Be Completed Per Axle

New rotors must be broken in before they may be used. When braking, this guarantees that the fresh rotors perform to their maximum potential. Please refer to this page for the necessary break-in procedure. Keep your old rotors and use fresh brake pads to avoid having to worry about breaking in your new rotors.

What To Do With Old Brake Rotors: Can I Recycle Them? [Fix]

No, it is not time to discard your old brake rotors just yet. Even if you decide to get rid of them, you’ll need to figure out how to do it in the most environmentally friendly manner. There are a variety of options for reusing and recycling them. It’s possible that a few minor repairs here and there will be enough to restore the rotors back to working order. Consequently, if you inquire as to whether outdated brake rotors can be recycled, my instant and prompt response will be affirmative. I recognize that weak brake rotors usually cause problems as they age and get thinner, but there are methods for disposing of them that are both environmentally friendly and cost-effective.

  1. So, what should I do with my old, rusted brake rotors that have seen better days?
  2. They are made of iron and metal components, with some of them being made of aluminum.
  3. Rotors, with the exception of those made of carbon ceramics, are typically recyclable due to their design in terms of material composition.
  4. Rotors are a valuable commodity to individuals who deal in scrap metal since they are made entirely of pure metal.

How Should I Recycle My Old Rotors?

You’ll need to transport your old rotors to a recycling facility if you want to recycle them. It is considerably simpler to go to metal merchants in certain cities than it is in others. You can either utilize one of the provided sites or dial a number. In circumstances when you are unable to access these, it may be essential to inquire about or seek information from vehicle repair companies for assistance. Here are some ideas for repurposing your old rotors:

1. Use Local Garbage Transfer Stations

If you ask most individuals, the first thing that comes to mind when they think of throwing away their old brake rotors or just wishing to empty their overflowing garbage can is the local garbage transfer station. Known as recycling centers, these facilities are beneficial when you want to get rid of the discarded and old metal pieces that have accumulated in your garage over the years. It is necessary to identify the nearest trash can to your property as a first step. Make a phone call to the center to find out what kind of rubbish they accept.

Otherwise, you must wait. Before you begin putting the products into the truck, place bedding in the area where the rotors will be securely in place to prevent damage to your vehicle’s body. Some cardboard boxes that have been flattened will do the trick.

2. Make Use Of Craigslist Or Online Help

It is possible to obtain your brake rotors out of your house by using Craigslist or internet help. As you can expect, this approach is frequently demanding, especially if you have to transport it from your home on your own time. Craigslist may be a great resource in these kind of circumstances. There are a variety of methods to get in touch with the Craigslist staff. The crew is always there to assist you. Scavengers, on the other hand, who go around gathering discarded metal components from their homes, might be of assistance.

It is essential to weigh your rotors in order to establish the price range you may charge for them if you were to sell them.

Also, inquire as to whether or not they are willing to accept the items you are distributing.

3. Dump In Junkyard In Exchange For Money

It is possible to obtain your brake rotors out of your house by using Craigslist or internet help. Understandably, this technique might be difficult, especially if you have to transport it from your home on your own timetable. Craigslist may be a great resource in these kinds of circumstances. Getting in touch with the Craigslist staff may be accomplished in several ways. Whenever you need us, we’ll be there for you! Scavengers, who go around gathering useless metal objects from their houses, might also be of assistance.

We recommend that you weigh your rotors in order to calculate the price range you may expect to receive in return for selling them.

Find out whether they are willing to accept the items you are distributing as well.

How Can I Make My Brake Rotors Reusable?

It is possible to obtain your brake rotors out of your house by using Craigslist or internet assistance. Understandably, this procedure might be unpleasant, especially if you have to transport it from your home on your own. In such cases, you might enlist the assistance of Craigslist. There are several methods to get in touch with the Craigslist staff. The crew is available at all times. Scavengers, on the other hand, who go around gathering useless metal objects from their houses, might be useful.

It is recommended to weigh your rotors in order to establish the price range at which you may sell them.

Invite as many metal vendors as you can locate to come in and negotiate rates with you so that you may obtain as much as you want. Also, inquire as to whether or not they are prepared to accept the items you are distributing.

What Can Old Brake Rotors Be Use For?

Really, it all relies on how well the brake rotors are maintained. It is still possible to utilize the rotors for a variety of purposes if they are in excellent condition and not rusted or damaged. Manufacturers of dumbells, grinder stands, windchimes, and boat anchors are examples of what may be done with this material. Rotors that have seen little usage can be repurposed as weights for tractor wheels, or they can be recycled into a wall clock or sculpture foundation. Rotors are an excellent raw material for individuals who are involved in the production of floor lamp bases.

When Should Brake Rotors Be Discarded?

There is a lot that goes into determining whether it is appropriate to replace or trash your old brake rotors. Brake rotors are often meant to be thick and dense, with a high level of quality. Nevertheless, the thinner they grow as a result of aging, the weaker they become and the less likely they are to make enough contact with the brake pads. The suggested rotor thickness, on the other hand, differs from one model and one manufacturer to the next. The lowest suggested thickness for brake rotors is 1.7mm (0.07″), while the highest recommended thickness is 10mm (0.04″), depending on the manufacturer.

This is the same as 45 degrees.

It is also important to consider how many miles the rotors have traveled in choosing whether to replace and discard them.

Final Thoughts

Choosing the most appropriate time to replace or dispose of your old brake rotors involves a number of considerations. Brake rotors are typically designed to be thick and of high density to provide maximum stopping power. When brake pads wear down to a thin layer over time, however, they become weak and incapable of maintaining enough contact with the brake pads. The suggested rotor thickness, on the other hand, varies from one model and one manufacturer to the next. Brembo brake rotors are intended to be at least 1.7mm (0.07″) thick, with a maximum thickness of 10mm (0.04″) recommended.

A 45-degree angle may be calculated as follows: You should replace your rotors as soon as you discover that they have reached the minimum thickness criteria.

Rotors that have traveled between 30, 000 and 70, 000 miles on average, according to numerous automotive parts makers and industry specialists, should be replaced.

Best way to clean up rotors for re-use?

Thrill6 had first posted this. It is not recommended to use a polishing wheel or a grinder on your rotors. If the front and rear surfaces are not completely parallel and level, the brakes will pulse when you apply the brakes. They may be turned and honed for less than $10 if they are sent to Pep Boys (or any other company that does brakes). Simply replacing the brake pads will enough if you are not experiencing any difficulties with your brakes at the time of replacement. Fixing something that isn’t broken is never a good idea.

It takes a rotor to be around 4 thousandths of an inch out of tolerance before you will feel anything in the pedal, and there is no way this tool could remove that much material.

According to the BRM website, it is also recommended for use on fresh new rotors as well as on rotors that have been rotated.

If you have sturdy rotors, it’s not difficult to flip them around.

When applying fresh pads, I use the BRM tool to wipe them off and apply a non-directional pattern to them using a non-directional pattern. I’ve never had a single instance where it caused a problem with brake pulsation thereafter. This is precisely what the tool was intended to accomplish.

Brake Rotors: Resurface, When To Replace – Tire Review

Brake rotors, like brake pads, are not designed to live indefinitely. Every time the brakes are engaged, the rotors get worn down. Several factors influence the rate at which rotors wear, including the type of brake pads used on the vehicle, the metallurgy (hardness and quality) of the castings, the efficiency with which the rotors cool themselves, the type of driving in which the vehicle is subjected, the braking style used by the driver (aggressive or easy), and exposure to moisture and road salt.

  • Semi-metallic brake pads often include a high proportion of chopped steel fiber, resulting in greater wear on the rotors than most ceramic or non-asbestos organic (NAO) brake pads, according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
  • The quality of original equipment rotors can range from good to poor depending on the manufacturer.
  • After all, the rotors are a component of the braking system, and safety is of the utmost importance.
  • Good metallurgy is essential since it has an impact on the rotor’s friction properties, as well as its strength, hardness, sound characteristics, and even its corrosion resistance, among other things.
  • The majority of original equipment rotors used to be built with adequate thickness to withstand two or three pad changes as a rule.
  • The result is that brake pads may need to be replaced before the rotors have been worn down to the minimum thickness parameters (which are normally printed on the casting itself) — or even before the initial set of brake pads has to be replaced in some situations.
  • The mass of a rotor decreases as it wears down and gets thinner.
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It also weakens the rotor’s structural integrity, increasing the likelihood of cracking or even breaking (rotor failure).

Rotor replacement may be necessary when the minimum thickness specification has been reached or when the surface cannot be resurfaced without exceeding the dimension specifications.

Because they often endure the same level of wear, replacing one worn-out rotor on a vehicle frequently entails replacing both worn-out rotors on the vehicle.

The brakes may pull to one side if there is a large variation in rotor thickness between the two wheels.

Uneven wear is another issue that can lead to the failure of a rotor.

However, there are a variety of factors that might cause a rotor to wear unevenly, resulting in thickness variances that generate an uncomfortable pedal vibration when the brakes are activated.

The position of the rotor on the hub may occasionally be adjusted by reindexing it; however, if that doesn’t work, resurfacing the rotor on the vehicle using an on-car brake lathe or by putting thin tapered shims between the rotor and the hub can help minimize the amount of runout.

To begin, you must measure and note the point of maximum runout on the vehicle’s rotor with the rotor still attached.

After that, you may cut the rotor true and reinstall it on the automobile at the same index position as previously — and, ideally, the runout will have been eliminated.

It is possible that if the lug nuts are tightened with an impact wrench, they will twist and distort the hat section of the rotor, causing the disc section of the rotor to wobble as it rotates.

This type of deformation may be avoided by using a torque wrench to tighten the lug nuts to their ultimate torque setting.

This source of runout can be eliminated by using a drill-powered circular brush to clean the face of the hub and the inside face of the rotor hat portion, respectively.

The hard patches are more resistant to wear, whilst the softer portions around them are more susceptible to wear.

Because the hard areas frequently extend well below the surface of the pavement, resurfacing does not completely eliminate the problem.

The only way to fix this is to replace the rotor.

When a car is stored and not driven for an extended length of time, the rotors of all vehicles rust to some extent (like a week or more, especially in a damp environment).

General Motors is said to have eliminated chromium (a rust-inhibiting component) from certain of its cast iron rotor alloys in order to save money on manufacturing expenses.

Because it weakens rotors over time, rust is a negative thing because it causes the brakes to become loud when the vehicle is initially driven after it has been parked.

After a few stops, the rust is normally scraped away by the pads, but in the meanwhile, the rust is interfering with the pads’ ability to stop and reduce their stopping power.

When the brakes are used, the friction created by the brake pads rubbing against the rotors results in a significant amount of heat being generated.

In most cases, vented rotors are utilized for the front brakes, but non-vented rotors may be used in the rear brakes, where braking loads (and heat) are often smaller.

Replacement of original equipment rotors with aftermarket rotors that do not cool as efficiently as the original equipment rotors due to a decreased fin count or a different fin design may cause the brakes to run hot and increase the risk of brake fade.

Over time, this will result in increased pad and rotor wear, requiring the brakes to be maintained more frequently than they would be if the vehicle were driven more normally or lightly on the interstate.

Inspection of the rotor It is usually recommended that when brake pads are replaced, the rotors be measured to ensure that there is enough metal left for safe braking performance.

As an alternative, if there is still plenty of metal left in the discs, and there are no signs of hard areas, cracking, severe grooving, or corrosion, and there are no complaints about pedal pulsations, the discs can be resurfaced as needed to restore a level and smooth friction surface.

It is possible that they will not need to be chopped if they are quite smooth with minor grooving.

Resurfacing a rotor, by its very nature, takes metal from the rotor, making it thinner and shortening its remaining service life.

[source: wikipedia] (unless the rotors are badly grooved or uneven).

That’s something we’ll provide them.

Repairing the surface returns it to its original flat, smooth state, which improves friction properties, reduces noise-producing vibrations, and allows for maximum pad contact.

At some point, the pads will wear down to the point where they make complete contact with the rotors when they seat in place.

One may argue that not resurfacing the rotors is detrimental in terms of optimizing brake life as well.

Modern OEM rotors are often manufactured with a surface finish ranging between 30 and 60 inches RA (roughness average), with many falling in the 40 to 50 inch range.

It is recommended that when rotors are resurfaced, they be cut to suit these standards with sharp lathe bits and at the correct rotational and feed rates (not too fast!).

In addition, a vibration dampener should be installed on all types of rotors in order to decrease noise and tool chatter during operation.

Because many aftermarket rotors are so inexpensive these days, it is far more cost-effective to just replace the rotors rather than resurfacing them in most cases.

In most cases, new rotors should be ready to use right out of the package.

It will also diminish the thickness of the rotors, resulting in a shorter usable service life for the components.

When producing premium rotors, the same casting configuration as used in the original is often used (same number of cooling ribs between the faces and same pattern).

Premium rotors are also superior in terms of metallurgy, and they are created under stricter quality control standards.

Depending on the manufacturer, these rotors may not perform as well as original equipment or quality aftermarket rotors.

While a solid cast rotor’s center hat piece is significantly larger in diameter, the steering geometry (including scrub radius and toe alignment) is only marginally altered.

While some manufacturers (such as GM) continue to urge replacing the same with the same, others (such as Ford) believe it is acceptable to replace composite with cast.

What To Do With Old Brake Rotors

The most recent revision was made on June 30, 2021. Brake rotors are a critical component of your vehicle’s brake system. It is critical in the operation of your vehicle’s braking system, therefore be sure you have one. Nevertheless, as you are well aware, there is nothing in the world that is guaranteed to endure a lifetime. There is no exemption in the case of your brake rotors. It is possible for your vehicle’s brake rotor to get old and even ruined. If this occurs, you will be forced to take action to prevent more damage.

Your old brake rotors may be used in three ways, according to the general rule of thumb.

I’ll go over each of the alternatives.

Guides that are related:

  • Honda Odyssey brake pads
  • Brake pads for Honda Odyssey
  • Review of the best brake line flaring tool
  • Various techniques for removing a seized brake rotor

What To Do With Old/Used Brake Rotors

It is possible to resurface your brake rotors once or twice before replacing them. While this is a common practice, it is not universal. What truly goes wrong with the rotors is that they are built thinner than they should have been, and this is done in accordance with the safety regulations. Rotors’ thickness is lowered as a result of the resurfacing process, and this is not allowed for legal reasons to be used. On the side of your rotors, you will discover the legal limit of your rotors written.

  • You won’t have to be concerned about anything like that.
  • Keep in mind that the thickness should not be too different from one another.
  • In order to resurface the rotor, you will have to pay roughly $200 total, which includes the mechanic’s fee and labor price.
  • It will also provide you with mental tranquility.

Repurposing the Old Rotor

Repurposing, on the other hand, refers to the act of putting your brake rotor to another use. It is possible that your previous brake rotor does not have any rust on it. You may utilize them for your own home improvement project. Nowadays, many individuals recycle their old brake rotors and utilize them for a variety of innovative and spectacular projects. Old brake rotors are often melted down in their forge and then utilized to make a variety of other items once they are repurposed. You may repurpose an old rotor to create a floor lamp base, a boat anchor, dumbells, a grinder stand, a wind chime, and a metal sculpture foundation by reusing it.

Recycling the Rotor

Another alternative is to recycle the brake rotor, which is an environmentally friendly solution. Recycling is the process of making items worth using again. The majority of brake rotors may be recycled in their entirety. Because they are composed of cast iron, which is non-toxic and does not contain any harmful ingredients. It will have no effect on the environment if the damaged brake rotors are left in place. There is, however, one exception. Some brake rotors are constructed of carbon-ceramic, which is a rare material.

As a result, pay attention to this topic. The recycling procedure, on the other hand, is not as straightforward as you may imagine. You will need to take a few easy procedures in order to do this. Look at what they have to say.

Recycling center

For those of you who are merely interested in cleaning up some room in your garage, you may simply take your old rotor to your local recycling center. In order to do so, you must first locate your local or nearby recycling facility. Then, before placing the rotor onto your vehicle, speak with them and confirm whether or not they would accept the rotor for disposal. After that, prepare your vehicle by setting something down, such as flattened boxes of cardboard, on the ground where you will be installing your rotors before you begin.

Once you have finished packing the rotors, you can simply take them to the recycling facility.

Because the regulations differ from one center to the next.

Scrapyard

Again, if you have a large number of brake rotors and wish to recycle them, this is the method to use. Afterwards, you’ll have to dispose of your rotors in a junkyard. You will be able to make some extra money in this manner. The amount of money you will receive may vary depending on the scrapyard you choose. In general, you should expect to receive around $2 per rotor. However, this might vary. Your worth will be determined by the scrapyard. The scrapyard will take into account the current market value, the demand of the industry, the scrapyard’s location, the time of day, and the number of rotors you have.

If they don’t accept a modest bit of metal, you should speak with them about it.

The scrapyard will weigh you and pay you based on the amount of weight you have.

Craiglist:

If you have a large number of brake rotors and wish to recycle them, you can do it once more. After that, you’ll have to haul your rotors off to a junkyard or recycle center. So you’ll be able to supplement your income. According to the scrapyard, the amount of money you will receive will vary. For the most part, you should expect to receive roughly $2 each rotor sold. There are exceptions to this rule, as follows: Your worth will be determined by the scrapyard. The scrapyard will take into account the current market value, the demand of the industry, the scrapyard’s location, the time of day, and the number of rotors you have on hand.

If they don’t accept a modest bit of metal, then talk to them about it.

If the scrapyard determines that it is heavy, they will compensate you.

Do I really need to recycle my old brake rotors?

Now, the question is whether or not I actually need to replace my old brake rotors at this point in time.

The simple answer is no, as you might expect. Because the brake rotor does not contain any potentially hazardous materials. Recycling the brake rotor, on the other hand, is considerably superior and highly suggested if it is at all possible.

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