Steering Angle Sensor? (Suits you)

The Steering Angle Sensor is an important part of a vehicle’s safety system. It transmits the steering wheel’s rate of turn, wheel angle, and other important data to the specific vehicle’s computer. If there is a fault in the signal, the computer can disable the vehicle’s stability control.

carid.com

  • The Steering Angle Sensor is an important part of a vehicle’s safety system. It transmits the steering wheel’s rate of turn, wheel angle, and other important data to the specific vehicle’s computer. If there is a fault in the signal, the computer can disable the vehicle’s stability control.

What happens when a steering angle sensor goes bad?

When the sensor is faulty, misaligned, or damaged, the information it reads and sends to the vehicle’s on board computer is inaccurate. In most cases, this will lead to a “loose” condition in the steering wheel, where the amount of steering input you provide is not reciprocated by the action of the vehicle.

Can you drive with a bad steering angle sensor?

A faulty steering angle sensor will relay wrong messages to your steering wheel which can prevent you from making accurate turns while driving and this can cause you to veer off the road or run into other vehicles on the road or any other thing for that matter.

How do you know if your steering angle sensor is bad?

Bad Steering Angle Sensor Symptoms

  1. Check Engine Light.
  2. Traction Control Light Illuminates.
  3. Heavy Steering Wheel Turning.
  4. Car Acts Strange After Wheel Alignment.

Can a steering angle sensor cause limp mode?

BTW – a bad steering sensor should not cause your transmission to go into limp mode. It will affect your traction control, but even your ABS brakes should still function correctly. It just won’t intervene properly to get you out of a serious loss of traction, like taking a curve too fast on wet pavement.

How do you test the steering angle sensor?

To test the SAS, you have to back probe a connector that is typically under the steering column. As the steering wheel is turned 360 degrees, the SAS produces a signal that toggles between 0 and 5 volts. As the wheel is turned lock-to-lock, the voltage will reach 5 volts three times and 0 volts three times.

What does an angle sensor do?

The Steering Angle Sensor is an important part of a vehicle’s safety system. It transmits the steering wheel’s rate of turn, wheel angle, and other important data to the specific vehicle’s computer. If there is a fault in the signal, the computer can disable the vehicle’s stability control.

Where is the steering wheel position sensor located?

A steering position sensor (also called a steering angle sensor) may not be the most exciting part of a car, but along with brakes and the suspension system, it’s an important part as far as safety goes. It’s a donut-shaped sensor located in the steering column under the dash in GM vehicle.

Is a clock spring the same as a steering angle sensor?

Is a clock spring the same as a steering angle sensor? – Quora. Those two are not the same. The purpose of the clock spring is to allow the steering wheel to turn while also being able to make an electrical connection. So basically it is an electrical connector.

What does SAS reset mean?

Performing a Steering Angle Sensor Reset The procedure resets the steering angle to match the vehicle’s new thrust line after the alignment has been completed. A steering angle reset has become a necessary last step in a wheel alignment.

How do I calibrate my steering angle sensor?

Calibration is normally done with a scan tool. Sometimes the vehicle will need to be on an alignment rack. The calibration process is normally done by putting the wheels in the straight forward position, and then zeroing out the sensor with a scan tool.

How do you initialize the steering angle sensor?

STEERING ANGLE SENSOR INITIALIZATION PROCEDURE

  1. Inspect the wheel alignment, inflation pressure, and the installation condition of the steering wheel.
  2. Connect the negative battery cable.
  3. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
  4. Confirm that the DSC indicator light illuminates and that the DSC OFF light flashes.

Steering Angle Sensor 101

Many advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) features, from blind-spot recognition to autonomous driving, make use of the steering angle. More information is available by clicking here.

What and Why of Sensing the Steering Angles

In electronic stability control (ESC) systems, anti-lock braking systems (ABS), and advanced driver assistance systems, measuring the position angle and rate of turn is crucial (ADAS). These sensors are referred to as Steering Angle Sensors (SAS) by scan tools, and the information is often shown in degrees. A computer can evaluate if a vehicle is understeering, oversteering, or out of control based on information from the yaw, accelerometers, and wheel speeds along with other data. The SAS is often found behind the steering wheel, as part of a cluster of sensors.

Two signals are required for the ABS/ESC module in order to determine the location of the steering wheel, and these signals are frequently out of phase with one another.

A small number of SAS clusters and sensor modules are connected to the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus, which is a high-speed serial data network that interacts in binary language with other modules and nodes in the system.

As a result of this communication, the electric power steering system may get information from the steering angle sensor, and the stability control system can receive information from the steering wheel torque sensor, among other things.

In other words, a node, such as an SAS module, must understand and generate signals that can be understood by the other modules connected to the same bus.

Sifting through data

A scan tool is the most effective method of testing modules on a high-speed CAN bus. Most scan tools look directly at the data, but certain scan tools may not be able to look directly at the datastream for an SAS signal due to technical difficulties with the tool in question. If you find yourself in this circumstance, pay attention to how the activation of a sensor, switch, or component might alter the activity on the data bus. It is possible to view packets of data being transferred on a bus by using a scope linked between chassis ground and the bus wires in the OBD II DLC and examining at its voltage readings.

The content of the communication is hard to discern, but it is feasible to determine whether they are conversing.

This module may incorporate the SAS sensor cluster.

Although this module does not appear to be a box, it is really a component of the column and may have numerous CAN lines flowing out of it. When the SAS cluster fails, it is frequently impossible to replace it on its own and instead the complete unit must be replaced.

Resetting Steering Angle Sensors

After executing an alignment or changing elements in the steering system, many cars require that the SAS be reset or recalibrated to ensure proper operation. Reset processes may be classified into three categories:

  • For starters, certain systems are capable of self-calibration. Second, certain cars need the use of particular cables or grounding, as well as the pressing of specific buttons. Third, certain systems necessitate the use of a scan tool for calibration.

Even if the SAS is out of calibration, most cars are capable of determining whether or not they are moving in a straight path. If the angle is sufficiently out of range, it may generate a fault code and cause the ESC system to be disabled. Some Chrysler cars require no more than spinning the wheels lock-to-lock, centering the wheel, and cycling the key to recalibrate the sensor following an alignment or a dead battery. Newer automobiles are increasingly equipped with this “auto-learn” feature.

  1. In terms of scan instruments for resetting the SAS, there are several solutions available; some scan tools are even integrated into an alignment system.
  2. Some even include a technique for setting the steering stops for electric power steering, which may be found here.
  3. It is also necessary to attach a scan tool in order to verify the proper working of the SAS.
  4. It’s possible that the number is excessively negative or unlikely.

ADAS Connection

Many advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) features, from blind-spot recognition to autonomous driving, make use of the steering angle. If the steering angle sensor is not calibrated properly, it might result in the incorrect activation of numerous advanced driver assistance systems. It is the mistaken activation of the lane departure system that is the most irritating fault. Even the tiniest inaccuracy in the SAS might cause the car to believe that the driver is attempting to steer into an oncoming lane, which is dangerous.

Making sense of sensors: steering angle sensor

As of the 2012 model year, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration mandated that all new passenger vehicles sold in the United States be equipped with electronic stability control (ESC) to improve overall vehicle safety. The term “electronic stability control” refers to a system of sensors that operate in conjunction with a computer to enhance vehicle stability by detecting and limiting the loss of vehicle traction. The following sensors are the most crucial in the ESC system:

  • Sensors for yaw rate, lateral acceleration, wheel speed, steering wheel angle/steering torque, and other parameters.

These sensors rely on one another to provide the ESC module (which is normally a component of the ABS module) with precise information about the steering wheel’s connection to the wheels, such as the rate of turn or the amount of traction. For this reason, anytime there is a modification to the steering system, it is critical that the steering wheel angle sensor be reset or calibrated to ensure that appropriate information is sent. Many vehicles today are equipped with variable effort power steering, EPS (Electric Power Steering), and ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) such as LKA (Lane Keep Assist), as well as semi-autonomous driving systems, all of which rely on accurate information from the steering angle/steering torque sensor to function correctly.

See also:  Should you buy an extended warranty? (Perfect answer)

How steering angle and steering torque sensors work

The steering angle sensor (SAS) recognizes where the driver want to guide the car by aligning the steering wheel’s angle with the vehicle’s wheel rotational angle. The steering angle sensor, which is located within the steering column, is always comprised of more than one sensor that is bundled together in a single unit for redundancy, accuracy, and diagnostics. When it comes to steering input angle and turn direction, analog sensors rely on voltage differences to provide information, whereas digital sensors rely on an LED light to calculate the steering input angle and turn direction.

Aside from that, the SAS offers information on how quickly the steering wheel is being twisted.

ESC will read a high rate of wheel rotation when traveling at highway speeds as a sign that the vehicle has lost control of its intended direction and will activate the brakes.

As the driver turns the steering wheel/steering shaft, it behaves similarly to a torsion bar in that it bends very little in response.

How electronic stability control works

The information received by the ESC module from the yaw, lateral accelerometer, SAS, steering torque sensors, and wheel speed sensors is then compared against information stored in software within the ESC module to determine whether information is more accurate. If there are any discrepancies in the information, the ESC will aid the driver in correcting the car so that he or she may keep control of the vehicle. In other cases, such as when the ESC senses a lack of steering control, it automatically instructs the ECM to limit engine torque.

If torque reduction fails to restore directional control to the vehicle, the ESC/ABS module applies the brakes to the appropriate wheels to assist in restoring directional control to the vehicle.

Depending on how far the angle is wrong, this might cause the ESC system to be disabled or, even worse, force the wheel to turn in an unanticipated direction when the angle is off.

Symptoms of a bad or failing steering angle sensor

Steering angle sensors do not fail frequently since they are meant to last the lifetime of the vehicle; nonetheless, conditions outside the control of the majority of vehicle owners might cause the sensor to wear out or fail entirely.

Fortunately, there are two warning indicators that indicate when the steering angle sensor is malfunctioning or has failed, which will alert the driver that the steering angle sensor needs to be replaced.

  • When the Traction Control Light or the Check Engine Light illuminates, it means that something is wrong with the vehicle.

A sensor that begins to fail will most likely collect or send information that is erroneous, or if the sensor fails completely, no information will be captured at all. There are some inconsistencies in the information from the SAS that is transmitted to the ESC, and this results in an error code being sent to the vehicle’s engine control module (ECM), which subsequently illuminates a warning light on the dashboard. Most automobiles will have a Traction Control Light illuminated, however some cars may have a Check Engine Light illuminated instead of, or in addition to, the Traction Control Light.

  • As soon as a sensor begins to fail, the information it collects or sends will most likely be inaccurate, or if the sensor fails completely, no information will be collected at all. An error code is sent to the vehicle’s engine control module (ECM), which in turn activates a warning light on the dashboard if there are any discrepancies in the information from the SAS being sent to the ESC. Traction control lights are typically displayed as a warning light on most cars, but on some vehicles, a Check Engine light may be displayed instead of or in addition to the Traction Control Light, as shown in the image below. It is indicated by these warning lights that the vehicle’s electronic stability control system (ESC) has been disabled and that the vehicle should be taken into service.

It is possible that the sensor’s information collected and transmitted to the ESC module will be wrong if it is mounted incorrectly, damaged, or malfunctioning. Because of this, the electric power steering module (EPS) might supply steering input or adjustments at the incorrect moment, which will most commonly result in the steering wheel feeling loose or adding play to it. This occurs as a result of the amount of steering input you provide not being correctly sent to the wheels. If you ever get the sensation that there is a disconnect between the steering wheel and the actual steering of the automobile, you should take your vehicle in for a service examination.

Make careful to double-check with the technician before getting into the vehicle and driving it on the highway.

Steering angle sensor reset

Over 40 million vehicles on the road today are equipped with electronic stability control systems (ESCs), which necessitate the recalibration of the steering angle sensor after a wheel alignment or the installation of a suspension or steering part, as recommended by the vehicle’s original manufacturer. Depending on the vehicle, there are two different methods for resetting the steering angle sensor: Some automobiles have the ability to adjust the SAS automatically by merely moving the steering wheel from lock to lock to center.

  • The following time the vehicle is driven in a straight line for a certain length of time, which is normally only a few seconds at highway speed, some newer cars with more advanced wheel speed sensors may automatically reset their own SAS.
  • The SAS reset feature of a scan tool is incorporated into some types of alignment equipment, removing the requirement for the technician to utilize a scan tool once an alignment has been completed.
  • When in doubt, please consult the manufacturer’s service manual for the right process for resetting the steering angle sensor on your vehicle.
  • Our goal is to provide a one-stop shop for all of your driving needs.

We not only offer components, but we also train experts in the proper procedures for working on steering and suspension systems. Please get in touch with us right away if you would like to join up for a course on steering and suspension.

Technical: Steering Angle FAQs

Not many people are aware that when an alignment is performed or after components of the steering system are replaced, many cars need that the steering angle sensor be reset or re-calibrated. More information is available by clicking here. It’s unlikely that you’ll ever need to open a steering angle sensor cluster to perform maintenance. This sensor, on the other hand, should not be a mystery. Understanding how the ABS and stability control sensors measure angles and information is crucial to performing successful ABS and stability control diagnostics.

Why Measure Steering Angle?

The angle of the steering wheel may be utilized to establish the direction in which the front wheels are oriented on its own. Using the yaw, accelerometer, and wheel speed sensors, as well as other bits of information from the vehicle, it is feasible to measure the dynamics of the vehicle. The acquired information allows the stability control system to assess the intentions of the driver, how the vehicle is behaving, and what changes may be done with the ABS hydraulic control unit using the data collected by the system.

How is the Angle Measured?

Optical sensors, the hall effect, and other technologies can be used to determine the direction of the steering wheel. The steering wheel’s movement is measured by these sensors in degrees of rotation.

What is the Difference Between Analog and Digital?

Analog SASs are comparable to throttle position sensors in their functionality. It is possible to test the SASs using a port located behind the steering column, which is wired with a 5-volt reference, chassis ground, and signal outputs. With each rotation of the steering wheel, the SAS generates an electrical signal, which alternates between 0 and 5 volts while the wheel is rotated 360 degrees. With meters linked to the two SAS sensors, it is possible to monitor the signal ranging from 0 to 5 volts.

If the readings from the two sensors are the same, it is possible that the two sensors have been shorted together.

Digital steering angle sensors monitor the angle and convert it into information that may be communicated with other modules through a serial data bus or by a standalone connection with the steering wheel.

Electric power steering, intelligent lamps, and even stop/start systems can all benefit from the utilization of this data PID.

Why Two Sensors?

In the majority of circumstances, a single sensor would suffice. On the gearbox, there is just one crankshaft position sensor, one wheel speed sensor for each wheel, and one output sensor for each gear. The steering angle sensor, on the other hand, is made up of two or three sensors that are bundled together. The only additional sensors on a car of this type are the throttle angle sensor and the gas pedal, if the vehicle is equipped with throttle by wire technology. The use of many sensors is motivated by the need for redundancy, accuracy, and diagnostics.

See also:  Should you hire a mobile mechanic? (Question)

The vast majority of sensors are bundled together in a single device.

When the two signals are merged, they can provide a more precise reading of the locations of the wheels as well as the pace at which the positions are changing.

The correctness of the signal outputs is ensured by comparing the two signals together. The electromechanical steering system in the new Mercedes-Benz A-Class is a first for the automobile industry.

Wiring Problems

A single sensor would enough in the vast majority of circumstances. On the transmission, there is just one crankshaft position sensor, one wheel speed sensor for each wheel, and one output sensor. The steering angle sensor, on the other hand, is comprised of two or three sensors that are bundled together in one unit. The only additional sensors on a car of this type are the throttle angle sensor and the gas pedal, if the vehicle is equipped with throttle-by-wire functionality. Redundancy, precision, and diagnostics are all reasons for using several sensors.

The vast majority of sensors are bundled together in a single unit for convenience.

It is possible to get a more precise reading on the wheel positions and how quickly they are changing if these two signals are used together.

When driving the new Mercedes-Benz A-Class, the electronic steering system assists the driver.

Why Do They Need Calibration?

In many cases, when an alignment is completed or after elements in the steering system are replaced, the SAS must be reset or recalibrated in order to function properly. Generally speaking, there are three sorts of reset procedures: systems that self-calibrate on their own; cars that require the pressing of certain wires or buttons; and systems that require the use of a scan tool to calibrate. Even if the SAS is out of calibration, most cars are capable of determining whether or not they are moving in a straight path.

Depending on the vehicle, some newer models can be calibrated automatically by turning the steering wheel from lock to lock, then centered and cycling the key.

Some instruments are even incorporated into an alignment system, which is quite convenient.

It’s also a good idea to execute a lock-to-lock spin to ensure that the calibration is complete.

What do you need to know about the steering angle sensor? – Mysweetindulgence

What exactly is a Steering Angle Sensor (SAS)? The steering angle sensor (SAS) is a vital component of the electronic stability control system (ESC), since it detects the angle and rate of turn of the steering wheel. Which situations need the resetting of the Steering Angle Sensor?

How can I change the steering wheel position?

It is not difficult to make the switch; simply remove the lower dash covers, locate the steering column, and dismantle at the joint.

Before disassembling the steering wheel, check to see that it is straight, and do not move the wheel after the joint has been disassembled. If you do, you run the danger of damaging the air bag system’s spring, which is expensive to replace.

How to install steering angle sensor on GMC Yukon?

Failure to do so will result in misalignment of the sensor when it is installed. If the sensor is misaligned, a new one will have to be purchased. Make an alignment mark on the rotor flange cuff of the flush rotor (3). Disconnect the sensor’s connection from the sensor. Remove the sensor from the adapter and bearing assembly by pulling it out with your fingers. To complete the installation of the sensor, go to step 5 of the setup procedure.

Can a GM steering wheel sensor be replaced?

Easy replacement for most people, and it saves them money over having a dealer perform the same replacement. This procedure will necessitate the use of an ABS/traction code scanner in order to remove the code from the vehicle’s computer. The traction control system on certain General Motors cars is prone to malfunction, resulting in a code and an intermittent warning light on the dashboard.

Is there power steering on a Chevy Tahoe?

When I start the Tahoe, the lights on the dashboard flash for service stabilitrak, service power steering, steering help reduced, drive with care, and park assist off. The brake light, the abs light, and the stabiltrak light are all illuminated at the same time. While driving, there is no power steering available. What exactly is a Steering Angle Sensor (SAS)? The steering angle sensor (SAS) is a vital component of the electronic stability control system (ESC), since it detects the angle and rate of turn of the steering wheel.

Where is the steering position sensor on a GMC Sierra?

Another sensor (part no. 26064468) that is compatible with a variety of GMC and Chevrolet vehicles and SUVs (and costs more than $100) is also available. It costs $59 from the General Motors Parts Center. There are two possible locations for steering position sensors in the steering column assembly: on the left side of the steering column assembly, or on the right side. This button is located at the top of the steering column, directly behind the steering wheel.

How do you replace a steering position sensor?

Pulling the lower steering column up into position and inserting the bolt through the column are the next steps. Tighten the nut using your fingers. Once the bolt and nut are securely fastened, you may free the steering and move the wheel slightly to the left to complete the installation. Afterwards, you may tighten the nut with a socket to its maximum torque. Don’t want to deal with a faulty sensor in the near future? Consider the option of bypassing the EVO.

What is the caster angle on a steering wheel?

Caster Caster is the angle created by a line passing between the pivot points and a vertical line passing through the stub axle. Caster is measured in degrees. It might have a bad or good connotation. The caster aids in the self-centering process of the steering by allowing the wheel to pivot. The caster angle is not the same as the tyre wearing angle. An excessive amount of lateral variation indicates that the vehicle will draw to the side with the least positive caster.

What to do if your steering angle is too far off?

While most cars can identify if they are moving in a straight line if the SAS is out of calibration, when the angle is too far off, the ESC may become deactivated.

Depending on the vehicle, some newer models can be calibrated automatically by turning the steering wheel from lock to lock, then centered and cycling the key. In terms of scan tools, there are several possibilities for resetting SASs.

When to change steering angle and wheel alignment?

When you modify your camber angle, you should have your wheel alignment examined and changed as needed to compensate. 3. Inclination of the steering axis (SAI) The Steering Axis Inclination, often known as SAI, is the angle created between the pivot points and the vertical line passing through the center of the steering wheel’s center. Caster Caster is the angle created by a line passing between the pivot points and a vertical line passing through the stub axle. Caster is measured in degrees.

The caster aids in the self-centering process of the steering by allowing the wheel to pivot.

An excessive amount of lateral variation indicates that the vehicle will draw to the side with the least positive caster.

3.

What should the steering angle be on a motocross bike?

The steering-head angle may be calculated by measuring the angle between the axis of the steering-head and the horizontal. 4) Motocross motorcycles have head angles ranging from 27.5 degrees to 26 degrees. If the steering head is inclined forward by 26 degrees, it signifies that the steering head is at a steeper, faster-turning angle than it would be otherwise. A 26-degree rake is the same as a 64-degree head angle when it comes to golf.

Steering Angle Sensor Basics

Most likely, you will never have to open a steering angle sensor (SAS) cluster to perform a repair on it. This sensor, on the other hand, should not be a mystery. In order to be effective at ABS and stability control diagnostics, it is necessary to understand how sensors measure angles and information.

Why Measure Steering Angle?

The angle of the steering wheel may be utilized to establish the direction in which the front wheels are oriented on its own. Using the yaw, accelerometer, and wheel speed sensors in conjunction with other bits of information, it is feasible to determine the dynamics of the vehicle. In order to assess the driver’s intentions, how the vehicle is behaving, and which corrections may be performed using the ABS hydraulic control unit, the stability control system uses the information it collects.

How is the angle measured?

It is possible to determine the steering angle with optical sensors, by analyzing the Hall effect, and with other technologies as well. The steering wheel’s movement is measured by these sensors in degrees of rotation.

See also:  Chrysler Pacifica Recall? (Suits you)

What is the Difference Between Analog and Digital?

Analog SASs are comparable to throttle position sensors in their functionality. It is possible to test SASs using a port located behind the steering column, which is wired with a 5-volt reference, chassis ground, and signal outputs. With each rotation of the steering wheel, the SAS generates an electrical signal, which alternates between 0 and 5 volts while the wheel is rotated 360 degrees. With meters linked to the two SAS sensors, it is possible to monitor the signal ranging from 0 to 5 volts in voltage.

If the readings from the two sensors are the same, it is possible that the two sensors have been shorted together.

Digital steering angle sensors monitor the angle and convert it into information that may be communicated with other modules through a serial data bus or by a standalone connection with the steering wheel.

Instead of adjusting the voltage, these sensors generate a coded signal that specifies the steering angle being applied. Electric power steering, intelligent lamps, and even stop/start systems can all benefit from the utilization of this data PID.

Why Two Sensors?

In the majority of circumstances, a single sensor would suffice. Only one crankshaft position sensor, one wheel speed sensor per wheel, and one output sensor per gearbox are used in this configuration. The steering angle sensor, on the other hand, is made up of two or three sensors that are bundled together. The only additional sensors on a car of this type are the throttle angle sensor and the gas pedal, if the vehicle is equipped with throttle by wire technology. The use of many sensors is justified by the need for redundancy, accuracy, and diagnostics.

The vast majority of sensors are bundled together in a single device.

The correctness of the signal outputs is ensured by comparing the two signals together.

Wiring Problems

On some high-end vehicles equipped with power steering wheel adjustments, one of the most typical concerns encountered is the movement of the steering wheel to make entrance and exit simpler. Unfortunately, this movement has the potential to cause damage to the steering angle sensor’s wiring harness. When the wiring is broken, it is possible that occasional difficulties will occur.

Why do they need calibration?

Several automobiles need that the SAS be reset or re-calibrated after an alignment is completed or when elements in the steering system are repaired or replaced. There are three sorts of reset procedures: systems that self-calibrate on their own, cars that require the pressing of certain wires or buttons, and systems that require the use of a scan tool to calibrate. While most cars can identify if they are moving in a straight line if the SAS is out of calibration, when the angle is too far off, the ESC may become deactivated.

In terms of scan tools, there are several possibilities for resetting SASs.

However, most instruments require that the calibration be conducted on a flat surface and that the calibration be completed with a lock-to-lock rotation.

Quick Tip: Wheel Alignment/Steering Angle Sensor Reset

Getting to Know the SureTrackDiagnostics Product Family

Accessing SureTrack Community

Using the SureTrack CommunityDiagnostics Product Family is simple.

  • AppolLO-D8TM
  • ETHOS® Edge
  • MODIS EdgeTM
  • SOLUS EdgeTM
  • VERUS® Edge
  • VERUS® PRO
  • ZEUS®
  • ZEUS® APOLLO-D8TM

Diagnostic Safety Manual

Important Precautions Should Be Taken Product Families for Diagnostics

  • Diagnostic Thermal Imager
  • Diagnostic Thermal Imager Elite
  • Diagnostic Thermal Laser
  • ETHOS® Edge
  • ETHOS® Plus
  • ETHOS® PRO
  • P1000
  • SOLUS EdgeTM
  • SOLUS LegendTM
  • SOLUS Ultra
  • TRITON-D10TM
  • TRITON-D8®
  • VANTAGE® Legend
  • VANTAGE® Ultra
  • ZEUS®
  • ZEUS® Pro
  • ZEUS® Tech

Product Warranty – 12 Month

A 12-month warranty is provided by the manufacturer. The product family includes diagnostic products.

  • The ETHOS® Plus, the MODIS UltraTM, the SOLUS EdgeTM, the SOLUS Ultra®, and the VANTAGE® Ultra are all examples of ETHOS® products.

Software License Agreement

Software License Agreement with Snap-on Incorporated for the Diagnostics Product Family

  • SOLUS EdgeTM
  • SOLUS Ultra®
  • APOLLO-D8TM
  • VANTAGE Ultra
  • VERUS® Edge
  • VERUS® Plus
  • ETHOS® PRO
  • ETHOS® Tech
  • MODIS EdgeTM
  • MODIS UltraTM
  • P1000TM
  • SOLUS EdgeTM
  • ZEUS®
  • ZEUS® Pro
  • ZEUS® Tech
  • ZEUS

AiM Steering Angle (Rotary Potentiometer/Belt Type) 1 Rev Kart Sensor

The AiM steering angle sensor and bracket are compatible with all AIM MyChron kart dash/data recorders, including the MyChron XT (this includes MyChron 5 S, MyChron 5 and MyChron 4, both single and two temp versions).

Key Features:

Measuresrecords driver steering inputs Compatible with MyChron 4MyChron 5 s
4 pin 719 male binder connector Optional patch lead

AiM Steering Angle (Rotary Potentiometer/Belt Type) 1 Rev Kart Sensor

The AiM steering angle sensor and bracket are compatible with all AIM MyChron kart dash/data recorders, including the MyChron XT (this includes MyChron 5 S, MyChron 5 and MyChron 4, both single and two temp versions). Depending on the configuration, the sensor may be delivered with or without the patch cable necessary for connection to the MyChron expansion box, which is the traditional method of adding additional sensors to your system. A sensor (spinning potentiometer) is used to monitor and record the driver steering input.

You can see where the driver is losing time as a result of the steering angle, which might be either too much or too little at each bend.

Connections

With this sensor, you can purchase an optional patch lead that will connect to your computer. The extension cable is used to connect the MyChron Expansion Box to the computer. The 712-719 male to female 4 pin patch lead is required for this sensor, and it is available in a variety of lengths ranging from 50cm to 400cm in length. In the Accessories section of the menu bar.

AiM Steering Angle (Rotary Potentiometer/Belt Type) 1 Rev Kart Sensor

  • The electrical specifications of the Kart steering potentiometer are as follows: nominal resistance: 10k
  • Tolerance on the resistance value: 5 percent
  • Precision (percent): 0.034
  • Nominal resistance: 10k
  • Tolerance on the resistance value: 5 percent
  • Precision (percent): 0.034
  • The mechanical features of the Kart steering potentiometer are as follows: mechanical displacement: 270° +/-10°
  • Temperature working range: -55/+125°C
  • 1.6 watts of dissipated power at 40 degrees Celsius
  • 1 watt of dissipated power at 70 degrees Celsius
  • 4 pins Binder 719 male connection

AiM Steering Angle (Rotary Potentiometer/Belt Type) 1 Rev Kart Sensor

  • 1G Kart Steering Rotary Potentiometer
  • 1 Toothed Belt
  • 1 Allen Key
  • 2 Toothed Pulley
  • 1 Bracket
  • 1 1G Kart Steering Rotary Potentiometer

Fits For Chevrolet Captiva Opel Antara 96625845 New Steering Angle Sensor

Shipping to: Anywhere in the world The following countries are excluded: Alaska/Hawaii, US protectorates, APO/FPO, Central America and the Caribbean, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Laos, Macau, Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Colombia, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Martinique, Mont Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mayotte, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Western Samoa, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde Islands, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Chad, Comoros, Congo-Democratic Republic of the, Congo Venezuela; Afghanistan; Armenia; Azerbaijan Republic; Bangladesh; Bhutan; Georgia; Kazakhstan; Kyrgyzstan; Maldives; Mongolia; Pakistan; Sri Lanka; Tajikistan; Turkmenistan; Uzbekistan; Venezuela

Genuine OEM Saturn Steering Angle Sensor

Saturn Steering Angle Sensor6 Results may be found in this category. We provide a comprehensive range of authentic Saturn Steering Angle Sensor, each of which has been thoroughly tested and verified by Saturn for fit, shape, and performance. Please narrow down the results for the Steering Angle Sensor by selecting a vehicle.

  • Steering Angle Sensor for Saturn (Part Number: 15260309) Sensor Assembly, Steering Wheel Position Sensor Assembly It is compatible with the following Saturn models:
  • Saturn Aura|XR 4 DOOR NOTCHBACK|6 Cylinder 3.6L
  • 2009 Saturn Aura|XR 4 DOOR NOTCHBACK|6 Cylinder 3.6L
  • Saturn Aura|XE 4 DOOR NOTCHBACK, XR 4 DOOR NOTCHBACK|6 Cyl 3.5L, 6 Cyl 3.6L
  • 2008 Saturn Aura|XE 4 DOOR NOTCHBACK, XR 4 DOOR NOTCHBACK
  • 2007 Saturn Aura|XE 4 DOOR NOTCHBACK, XR 4 DOOR NOTCHBACK

Steering Angle Sensor for Saturn (Part Number: 15863534) This sensor assembly for steering angle is compatible with the following Saturn models:

  • Saturn Sky|2 DOOR CONVERTIBLE, TURBO 2 DOOR CONVERTIBLE|4 Cyl 2.0L, 4 Cyl 2.4L
  • 2008 Saturn Sky|2 DOOR CONVERTIBLE, TURBO 2 DOOR CONVERTIBLE
  • 2007 Saturn Sky|2 DOOR CONVERTIBLE, TURBO 2 DOOR CONVERTIBLE|4 Cyl 2.0L, 4 Cyl 2.4L
  • Saturn Sky|2 DOOR CONVERTIBLE, TURBO 2 DOOR CONVERTIBLE
  • Saturn Sky|TURBO 2 DOOR CONVERTIBLE
  • Saturn Sky|TUR

Sensor Assembly-Steering Angle for SaturnPart Number: 25853012Sensor Assembly-Steering Angle for Saturn Models: Fits Saturn Models:

  • 2008 Saturn Outlook|SPORT UTILITY VEHICLE 2WD and 4WD|6 Cyl 3.6L
  • 2010 Saturn Outlook|SPORT UTILITY VEHICLE 2WD and 4WD|6 Cyl 3.6L
  • 2009 Saturn Outlook|SPORT UTILITY VEHICLE 2WD and 4WD|6 Cyl 3.6L

Steering Angle Sensor for Saturn (Part Number: 88965543)Sensor,Steering Wheel Position Sensor It is compatible with the following Saturn models:

  • The 2007 Saturn Relay|RELAY|6 Cyl 3.9L
  • The 2006 Saturn Relay|AWD, RELAY|6 Cyl 3.5L, 6 Cyl 3.9L
  • And the 2005 Saturn Relay|AWD, RELAY|6 Cyl 3.5L are examples of the most recent Saturn Relay models.

Sensor Assembly-Steering Angle for SaturnPart Number:15115918Sensor Assembly-Steering Angle for the Saturn Models listed below:

  • Saturn Outlook|SPORT UTILITY VEHICLE 2WD, SPORT UTILITY VEHICLE 4WD|6 Cyl 3.6L
  • Saturn Outlook|SPORT UTILITY VEHICLE 2WD, SPORT UTILITY VEHICLE 4WD|6 Cyl 3.6L
  • Saturn Outlook|SPORT

Sensor for the steering angle in the Saturn 22880598 is the part number. This sensor assembly for steering angle is compatible with the following Saturn models:

  • The 2010 Saturn Vue|XE FWD, XR FWD|6 Cyl 3.5L, 6 Cyl 3.6L
  • The 2009 Saturn Vue|XE AWD, XR AWD, XR FWD|6 Cyl 3.5L, 6 Cyl 3.6L
  • The 2008 Saturn Vue|XE AWD, XR AWD, XR FWD|6 Cyl 3.5L, 6 Cyl 3.6L
  • The 2009 Saturn Vu

Saturn Parts that are related

Popular Saturn Steering Angle Sensor

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *