Subaru lug nut torque specs? (The answer is found)

2020 Subaru Models Wheel Lug Nut Torque Specs Table

2020 Subaru Models Engine Wheel Lug Nut Torque Specs lb-ft (Imperial)
IMPREZA ALL F4-2.0L DOHC 88.5 lb-ft
LEGACY All Engines 88.5 lb-ft
OUTBACK All Engines 88.5 lb-ft
WRX ALL All Engines 88.5 lb-ft

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What is the torque for Subaru lug nuts?

You will need to torque Your lug nuts until they are in the 65 to 85 ft lbs range. The recommended lug nut torque specs for the Subaru Outback is listed at 65 – 85 ft-lbs from the manufacturer.

What is the torque for Subaru Outback lug nuts?

The 2018 Subaru Outback lug nut torque is 58-72 ft-lbs. The correct answer for the 2018 Subaru Outback with M12x1. 25, 19mm socket size lug nuts, is 89 lb-ft (120 N-m). Some info outlets publish it as 90 lb-ft, which is fine.

What is the average torque for lug nuts?

And when you look at that, and realize that the average torque required on a lug nut, to hold the wheel on, is 80 to 90 ft-lbs, well you can imagine how over-tightened some of these lug nuts are.

How do I know what to torque my lug nuts to?

Use torque sticks with an air gun or a torque wrench to get the correct torque. If your studs or lug nuts are sized between 12 X 1.25mm to 1.5mm or are 7/16-inch, torque the nuts to 70 to 80 foot-lbs; 14 X 1.25mm to 1.5mm, to 85 or 90; 1/2=inch 75 to 85; and 9/16-inch 135 to 145.

How do you rotate tires on a Subaru Outback?

The standard rotation pattern is to move the front tires straight back, so the driver’s side front tire is now the driver’s side rear tire, and the passenger’s side front tire becomes the passenger’s side rear And then move the back tires forward, but diagonally, so the driver’s side back tire becomes the passenger’s

What happens if you over torque lug nuts?

Excessively tightened lug nuts can strip the threads, distort brake rotors, damage the wheel, and possibly shear off the lug stud.

Can you over torque lug nuts by hand?

Over tightening means that you have reached the end of the thread so the nut is flat against the wheel or whatever and you continue to tighten and start stripping the thread or twisting the bolt. So no, unless you are a cyborg with bionic hands, you cannot over tighten a lug nut by hand.

Should you use an impact wrench to tighten lug nuts?

Do not use the impact to tighten the lug nuts, though. It is very easy to over torque them. Use a ratchet and finish up with a torque wrench for accuracy.

What is the torque spec?

Recommended torque specifications are unique for each type of vehicle. By definition, torque refers to the amount of rotational force at the point of application. When attaching a wheel to a vehicle, torque specifications are the amount of force recommended on the hardware to ensure proper installation.

Why do lug nuts need to be Retorqued?

Fast facts: Why lug nuts need retorquing Over time, lug nuts undergo the typical stresses and forces of a car in daily use. These stresses can sometimes result in tightening or loosening of the lug nuts. If lug nuts are too loose, there’s a small risk that the wheel could come off while you’re driving.

Why must wheel lug nuts be properly torqued using a torque wrench?

When installing the wheels on a vehicle after servicing, it is important to torque the lug nuts properly. Lug nuts that are not tightened correctly can ruin wheels, affect rotor runout and can be deadly if the wheel comes off or studs snap. Over-torqueing the lug nuts does not affect runout immediately.

Subaru Lug Nut Torque Specs Table

If you intend to put a wheel on your Subaru, it is critical that you be aware of the torque values advised by the manufacturer. It is important to use the right torque to ensure that the wheel assembly is properly mounted. A handy reference aid for roadside assistance professionals and DIY enthusiasts while working on any Subaru car, the Subaru Wheel Lug Nut Torque Chart we have created can be found here. Using the required torque from the manufacturer also helps to ensure that there isn’t any excessive or insufficient pressure on any of the components to which the wheel is attached during installation.

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Subaru Lug Nut Torque Specs Recommendations

Make Model Trim Year Range Torque
SUBARU B9 TRIBECA SUV / BASE/LIMTD 2006 – 2007 85 lb-ft
BAJA CRSSOVER / STD/SPORT 2003 – 2007 75 lb-ft
BRZ 17″BASE / ALL 2013 – 2018 90 lb-ft
CROSSTREK 17″BASE / 2.0I PREM 2016 – 2018 90 lb-ft
FORESTER 2.5X 17″BASE / PREMIUM 2009 – 2013 80 lb-ft
FORESTER 2.5XT 17″BASE / BASE 2009 – 2013 80 lb-ft
FORESTER 15-INCH / BASE/L/S 1998 – 2008 75 lb-ft
FORESTER 17″BASE / 2.5I 2014 – 2018 90 lb-ft
IMPREZA 5-DOOR 18″BASE / STI 2012 – 2018 75 lb-ft
IMPREZA 5-DOOR 15″BASE / 2.0I 2012 – 2018 90 lb-ft
IMPREZA ALL / BASE 1993 – 2011 75 lb-ft
IMPREZA SEDAN 17″BASE / WRX 2012 – 2014 75 lb-ft
IMPREZA SEDAN 15″BASE / 2.0I 2012 – 2018 90 lb-ft
JUSTY ALL / DL 1987 – 1994 75 lb-ft
LEGACY 2.5GT 17″BASE / LIMITED 2009 – 2012 90 lb-ft
LEGACY 2.5I 17″BASE / BASE 2009 – 2014 90 lb-ft
LEGACY 3.0R 18″BASE / LIMITED 2009 – 2009 90 lb-ft
LEGACY 3.6R 17″BASE / ALL 2010 – 2014 90 lb-ft
LEGACY ALL / AWD 1990 – 2007 75 lb-ft
LEGACY SDN/WGN / 2.5I 2006 – 2018 90 lb-ft
LOYALE 2 DOOR / BASE 1990 – 1994 75 lb-ft
OUTBACK 2.5I 16″BASE / BASE 2009 – 2014 90 lb-ft
OUTBACK 2.5XT 17″BASE / LIMITED 2009 – 2009 90 lb-ft
OUTBACK 3.0R 17″BASE / LIMITED 2009 – 2009 90 lb-ft
OUTBACK 3.6R 17″BASE / ALL 2010 – 2014 90 lb-ft
OUTBACK EDITION / L.L.BEAN 2002 – 2007 75 lb-ft
OUTBACK WAGON / 2.5I 2006 – 2018 90 lb-ft
SVX 2 DOOR / ALL 1992 – 1997 90 lb-ft
TRIBECA 18″BASE / BASE 2008 – 2013 90 lb-ft
WRX 17″BASE / BASE 2016 – 2018 90 lb-ft
XT 2 DOOR / GL/DL 1986 – 1991 75 lb-ft
XT6 ALL / FWD 1988 – 1991 75 lb-ft
XV CROSSTREK 17″BASE / ALL 2013 – 2015 75 lb-ft

Remove or Install Front or Rear Wheel – Generic Instructions

When removing and replacing a wheel on your car, always follow these general directions, but consult your owner’s handbook for more specific information. Always use the right equipment while raising your car, and only remove the vehicle off its jacking points one wheel at a time. If you are working on the opposite wheel from the one you are currently working on, always use two wheel chokes on both sides of the wheel to prevent the car from rolling and falling off the jack while you are working on it.

  • Never use an impact drill to remove wheel locking nuts or bolts
  • Instead, use a breaker bar to pry the nuts or bolts loose by hand. Do not leap or use your foot to break the breaker bar
  • Instead, use your hands. Removing debris, oil residues, and corrosion from the contact surfaces of the rim and wheel hub
  • Check that the brake disc holding bolt is securely fastened
  • Apply anti-seize paste to the wheel rim, ensuring that the paste is centered in the wheel rim
  • Clean the bolts or nuts on the wheels and inspect them for damage, replacing them if required. Wheel bolts that have deteriorated should be replaced. Attention! It is not recommended to use oil or grease on the wheel studs or bolts. The rim of the wheel must be flat against the brake disc in order for it to function properly. Using a crosswise sequence, screw in the wheel bolts or lug nuts and uniformly tighten them by hand in order to center the wheel rim
  • Using a calibrated torque wrench, tighten the wheel bolts or lug nuts in a transverse sequence to the prescribed tightening toque. To ensure consistency, inspect and tighten all wheel bolts or lug nuts in the same order. If required, retighten to the specified tightening tension. Use of pneumatic or electric screwdrivers to screw in and tighten the wheel bolts is not permitted under any circumstances.
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What is the torque spec for the lug nuts?

1:09-28-2019, 02:04 PM What is the torque spec for the lug nuts?
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Gonna rotate tires and wanna torque the lugnuts to spec.
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Quote:Originally Posted byAaronCompNetSys2019 = 85 ft lbWrong. close, but wrong. Posts like this are exactly why I originally answered as I did.


Last edited by ammcinnis; 10-08-2019 at09:26 AM.

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88.5 lfb-FT. (Subaru Wheels)._Lighting ModsLow Beams: D4S – OSRAM XENARC 66440 CBI HID BULBSHighbeam/DRL: 9005 – OSRAM NIGHT BREAKER UNLIMITED 9005NBUHCB BULBSFog: H11 – OSRAM NIGHT BREAKER UNLIMITED 64211NBU-01B BULBSSubaru 20mm RSB
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So, either 88.5 ft/lb or 85 ft/lb.It’s virtually the same. Unless you’re working with NASA’s tools, that’s well within the margin of error for any normal torque wrench. Set it to 90 or a hair less, and torque away. Bubba’s pneumatic tools down at the garage are probably +/-10%(if youre lucky).
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Quote:Originally Posted byBill G.So, either 88.5 ft/lb or 85 ft/lb.It’s virtually the same. well within the margin of error for any normal torque wrench.Technically correct, but fraught with possible abuse. (What is the “nut factor” for the OE wheel studs and nuts? It should be about 0.20, but I haven’t measured it and I’m confident you haven’t either.)But the question wasn’t, “What torque is ‘close enough?'” or, “What torque can I get away with?” The question was:Quote:What is the torque spec for the lug nuts?There is only one correct answer for that.


Last edited by ammcinnis; 10-08-2019 at04:53 PM.

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I bet your great at parties.I’ve been torqueing wheels at 85ftlb for years.
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An aside: most illustrative example of the variability of even the best clicker-style torque wrench I’ve seen was in the gage cal/standards lab at work. Calibration tech took a wrench and torqued on the standard using a few different hand positions relative to the handle, and got a different reading each time at click. Ranging from in to out of spec, depending only on how he held the wrench.Unless you have a calibrated high accuracy/precision digital gauge with an actual torque readout, I think we’re all in the same boat. Just use it to get you reasonably close, and as long as you use the wrench consistently get reasonably consistent torques between all the fasteners in the pattern.
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With wheels, its only critical to be within range and done in the correct order.Once I got the feeling of what 65-85 ft lbs feels like with the torque wrench (over several years), I just duplicate that with the breaker bar (for ten+ years).I take wheels off of my cars a lot and have had to replace lugs with worn out faces.Consistency is much more important.You don’t want a loose one and you always should check them again after test driving the vehicle.Don’t be anal about numbers when its more important to be consistent and create good habits.
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I don’t think the point was to be anal with numbers. The point is to have the correct information in an easy to find place. If there are many answers out there for a specific question that only has one answer, then that creates confusion for anyone else looking for the answer. I’m sure Subaru’s spec has taken into account that a typical wrench won’t hit the set point torque perfectly.
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Quote:Originally Posted byBoozeRS05I bet your great at parties.I’ve been torqueing wheels at 85ftlb for years.Hangs out with ehsnils a lot.
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Quote:Originally Posted byBill G.So, either 88.5 ft/lb or 85 ft/lb.It’s virtually the same. Unless you’re working with NASA’s tools, that’s well within the margin of error for any normal torque wrench. Set it to 90 or a hair less, and torque away. Bubba’s pneumatic tools down at the garage are probably +/-10%(if youre lucky).88.5 is from the 2016 Legacy Owners Manual, page 12-9._Lighting ModsLow Beams: D4S – OSRAM XENARC 66440 CBI HID BULBSHighbeam/DRL: 9005 – OSRAM NIGHT BREAKER UNLIMITED 9005NBUHCB BULBSFog: H11 – OSRAM NIGHT BREAKER UNLIMITED 64211NBU-01B BULBSSubaru 20mm RSB
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Quote:Originally Posted byBill G.So, either 88.5 ft/lb or 85 ft/lb.It’s virtually the same.Quote:Originally Posted byBoozeRS05I bet your great at parties.This discussion reminded me of a favorite quotation:”If you are going to achieve excellence in big things, you develop the habit in little matters. Excellence is not an exception, it is a prevailing attitude.”~ Gen. Colin PowellThen again, as a counter-argument I’ve also embraced another idea:”No amount of genius can overcome a preoccupation with detail.”~ Marion J. Levy (Levy’s Eighth Law)


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r/WRX – Wheel nut torque specs

I’ve discovered the internet! The first time I swapped out my winter tires for summer ones, I brought out the handbook to double-check the lug nut torque specifications. I heard the former owner of a 2014 hatchback claim he torqued it to 110-120lbf. The instruction specifies 72lbf, or 88-110lbf measured at the end of the wheel nut wrench, depending on the manufacturer. For reference, page 378 of the handbook states that there is a lot of variety. Do you have any suggestions? Is it safe to use a torque wrench with a 100lbf setting?

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3 years ago, level 2Op WRX Hatchback Premium (2014 model year) My goal tonight was to find a happy medium between the two, and I settled on 80 points.

That is clearly not the path I want to take.

For the record, the handbook specifies an 88.7 or some such number in the manual.

As a result, I merely round up to 89 and call it a day for the time being.

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