Toyota Sienna horn not working? (TOP 5 Tips)

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  • Some of the common causes that stops the horn from working normally on your Toyota Sienna are blown fuse, bad relay, faulty horn, corroded or worn out connector, broken wire, broken clock spring or bad horn button. 1. Blown fuse The horn on Toyota Sienna needs electricity to work.

What would cause my horn to stop working?

But an inoperative car horn can also be caused by a bad horn switch in your steering wheel, a broken “clock spring” under the steering wheel, a bum horn relay, a broken wire, or a corroded ground. If the fuse blows, you’ve got a bum horn.

Is there a fuse for your horn?

Horn works using electric power and, just like any other electrics-dependant part, it has a fuse. If the fuse is blown, you’ll simply need to replace it.

How much does it cost to fix a car horn?

Horn Replacement Cost – RepairPal Estimate. Labor costs are estimated between $65 and $83 while parts are priced at $70. This range does not include taxes and fees, and does not factor in your specific vehicle or unique location. Related repairs may also be needed.

Where is the fuse box in a 2011 Toyota Sienna?

The fuse box is located under the instrument panel (on the left side), behind the lid.

How do I know if my horn relay is bad?

A shorted or faulty relay may cause the component to produce a clicking sound when the hood button is pressed. The clicking sound may be a sign that the relay has failed internally, and may also render the horn unuseable.

Where is the horn fuse?

Typically, the fuse box is located to the left of the steering wheel at the base of the dashboard or immediately underneath. In some cars it’s located in a compartment underneath the hood. Look in your manual to locate which fuse powers the car horn.

Does the clock spring control the horn?

Clockspring (clockspring) is a device that contains a wound-up wire (ribbon cable) inside and allows the airbag, horn, and steering wheel buttons to stay connected as the steering wheel is rotated as you turn the steering wheel left and right.

Toyota Sienna horn not working

The fuse and horn relay, as well as the power feed to the horn switch in the steering wheel, must be checked and replaced in order to fix a Toyota Sienna horn that isn’t functioning properly. Then things start to get a little complicated. The majority of horn circuits provide electricity to the horn switch, and when you press the switch, you complete the circuit to ground, which activates the horn relay and sounds the horn. The difficulty with the Toyota Siennas from the 2000 model year is that they were not equipped with a typical horn switch ground wire connection.

When the lubricant in the combo switch bearings dries up and the ball bearings rust, this might cause the switch to malfunction.

I’ll demonstrate this in the diagram below.

Power is then sent to the horn switch from there.

Upon activation, the horn relay control coil is energized, and the contacts are moved to provide power to the horns.

See also: Toyota Sienna horn not working? (TOP 5 Tips)

Toyota Sienna horn diagnostic procedure

The fuse and horn relay, as well as the power feed to the horn switch in the steering wheel, must be checked and replaced in order to fix a Toyota Sienna horn that is not working. It’s at this point that things become a little complicated. For the most part, the horn circuit supplies electricity to the horn switch, and when you press the switch, it completes the circuit to ground, which then turns on the horn relay. One of the problems with the Toyota Siennas from the 2000 model year is that they were not equipped with the typical horn switch ground wire connection.

When the lubricant in the combo switch bearings dries up and the ball bearings rust, this might cause the switch to fail.

See the graphic below for further information.

The electricity is then routed to the horn switch from there on out.

In turn, this activates the horn relay control coil, which moves the contacts and supplies power to the horns in response to their activation. It is in the heart of the engine compartment that you will find the horns being ground.

Clean combination switch bearings

The fuse and horn relay, as well as the power feed to the horn switch in the steering wheel, must be checked and replaced in order to fix a Toyota Sienna horn that isn’t working. Then things start to become a little complicated. The majority of horn circuits send electricity to the horn switch, and when you press the switch, you complete the circuit to earth, which triggers the horn relay. The difficulty with the Toyota Siennas from the 2000 model year is that they do not have a standard horn switch ground wire connection.

  • Over time, the lubricant in the combo switch bearings might dry up and the ball bearings can rust.
  • I’ll illustrate this using the diagram below.
  • The electricity is then sent to the horn switch.
  • In turn, this activates the horn relay control coil, which moves the contacts and supplies power to the horns in response to its activation.

Jury rig a hardwired ground connection for the horn switch

Locate the wire that connects the horn switch to the combo switch and splice an additional length of wire to it. Continue down the steering column until you reach a clean metal grounding screw underneath the dash. Test. If it works, you can reassemble it. The year 2020 is a leap year. Rick Muscoplat is a professional musician. Rick Muscoplat posted a blog entry on

Horn Won’t Work-How to Troubleshoot The Horn on a 2004-2010 Toyota Sienna · Share Your Repair

Splice an extra length of wire to the wire that connects the horn switch and combo switch. Continue down the steering column until you reach a clean metal grounding screw beneath the dash. Test. If it’s still working, reassemble it again. 2020, a year of rebirth Rick Muscoplat is a songwriter and musician from the United States. Rick Muscoplat wrote a post on

Automobile:

  • Fluke 177 True RMS Digital Multimeter with Backlight (or any other multimeter that can measure DC voltage)
  • Fluke 177 True RMS Digital Multimeter with Backlight

Parts Needed:

  • 10 Amp fuse (if yours has blown, invest in a set that will handle all of your automotive requirements: Assorted 120 Car Truck Fuse (5,10,15,20,25,30 AMP)
  • Assorted 120 Car Truck Fuse (5,10,15,20,25,30 AMP)
  • Assorted 120 Car Truck Fuse (5

It was recently that I rebuilt the radiator in my 2004 Toyota Sienna, and I drew up a guide to show you how you can do it as well: How to Replace the Radiator on a Toyota Sienna from 2004 to 2007. It was only after I had replaced the radiator, which necessitated the removal of the horns, that I discovered the problem with the horn not working. Here’s how I was able to resolve the situation.

Step 1: Press the horn in the middle of the steering wheel.

If the horn does not sound, you are in the same boat as I was this morning, and you should continue reading.

Step 2: Will your horn go off if you press the panic button on your Sienna’s key chain remote?

Press and hold the red button on your remote control for many seconds. It was only one of the horns that went off when I did this, and it didn’t sound anything like it typically does.

When I was changing my radiator, I noticed that there were two horns attached within the bumper, as depicted in the photo below:

Horns are mounted inside behind the grill/bumper, in front of the radiator/condesor panels

In other words, because one of the horns went off, I knew that there was at least some electrical conductivity to one of the horns and that it wasn’t a fuse (and this was encouraging to me). However, for you, it is possible that a fuse has blown, therefore I will go to step 3 and demonstrate how to check the horn fuse.

Step 3: Has the horn fuse been blown?

To check your battery, open the hood of your van and look above and to the right of it. There is a black box–it is the fuse bank–that contains the following information: A latch is located on the side nearest to you and must be depressed in order for the top to be released: Because the top of the box is hooked under the far end of the lid, you’ll only want to raise the side of the box that is nearest to you while opening it. Once you’ve removed the lid, you’ll notice that there is a schematic on the inside of the lid that tells you which fuse is connected to which electrical component in the vehicle (and nicely there are extra, spare fuses in there too).

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Fuse diagram on inside of the lid of the fuse box

A horn relay as well as a horn fuse are provided. At this point, we’re more worried with the 10 Amp horn fuse than anything else. To remove it using needle nose pliers, simply pull it straight up and out: It will look like this when you have a good fuse: If the fuse was defective, the u-shaped wire that connects one leg of the fuse to the other leg of the fuse within the plastic container would be broken (burned through). A fuse may be purchased here if the original has failed and you need to replace it with one of the spares from a 10A spare location that is still available.

Step 4: Check for power at the horn.

It is possible that the fuse would be defective if the u-shaped wire that connects the two legs of the fuse within the plastic container was damaged (burned through). A fuse may be purchased here if the original has failed and you need to replace it with one of the spares from a 10A spare location that may be available.

Driver’s side horn seen below the horn release lever

Remove the clips from the top edge of the bumper by popping out the centers of the clips on the top edge of the bumper.

Remove these clips to gain access to the horns without taking off the bumper

Once you’ve removed the clips, you’ll be able to walk up to the top edge of the grill/bumper assembly and obtain access to the horn controls. There are some restrictions, and you must be careful not bend the grill back too much. However, I found it to be really adaptable. I was able to unhook the driver’s side horn connector without ever touching the bumper, which was a huge relief. One useful item that I used was my flexible grabber, which I used to hold the horn wire in place to prevent it from going under the bumper: Set the voltage reading on your multimeter to direct current (DC) (20 Volt Range or so since the readout is going to be between 0 and around 12 volts).

  1. Attach the negative lead to the van’s metal body using a safety pin (preferably in a non-painted area for the best electrical connection).
  2. It should be something in the neighborhood of 12 volts.
  3. A voltage reading of 12 or so volts indicates a good positive connection between your horn and the rest of the circuit.
  4. The ground wire connection in automobiles is made via the metal body of the car, therefore if the connection to the body is not strong enough, the vehicle may not function properly.

Although I secured the horns with bolts, it is possible that corrosion or debris has formed between the horn and the car.

Step 5: Check the ground connection of the horn.

I came to the conclusion that the problem was with the ground connection between the horn and the vehicle. I removed each of the horns. Each one is held in place by a single 12mm hex-head bolt. Here’s how I’m removing the horn on the driver’s side:

Driver’s side horn removed–note the dirt on the painted surface around the hole where it was bolted to the van

I put the horn on a grinder and ground off all of the paint and rust from the tab, as follows: In addition, I scuffed up the area where the horn mounts to the van’s chassis:

I roughed up the place where the horn mounts too

Install both horns back into their original positions, then reconnect their electrical connectors, and you should be back in business. If your horn isn’t working, it’s most likely because of a grounding issue (and you recently removed the horn like me).

All My Toyota Sienna Posts:

  • Instructions on how to change the air conditioner display on a 2004 Toyota Sienna. From metric to imperial
  • From metric to English How to Replace the Front Struts on a 2004 Toyota Sienna with Front Wheel Drive
  • Instructions on how to replace the air filter in a 2004 Toyota Sienna
  • 2004 Toyota Sienna XLE After restarting the vehicle, the DVD entertainment system fails to display video. Instructions for repairing Sienna Dome lights that come on at random and alarm that goes off
  • On a 2004 Toyota Sienna, here’s how to replace the rear liftgate shocks: On a 2004 Toyota Sienna, here’s how to replace the cabin air filter: What you need to know about programming the door lock transmitter on a 2003 Toyota Sienna On a Toyota Sienna XLE from 2004 to 2007, here’s how to replace the power sliding door cables: Learn how to extend the life of the sliding door cables on your Toyota Sienna. How to Install a New Stereo in a Toyota Sienna from 2004 to 2010
  • How to Replace the Spring on the Cassette Door on a Toyota Sienna Stereo from 2004 to 2010
  • How to program a keyless entry remote for a Toyota Sienna model year 2004-2010
  • Changing the time/clock on a 2004-2010 Toyota Sienna
  • Horn Won’t Work-How to Troubleshoot the Horn on a 2004-2007 Toyota Sienna
  • Removing the Front Bumper on a 2004-2007 Toyota Sienna
  • Replacing the Starter on a 2004-2007 Toyota Sienna
  • Replacing the Thermostat on a 2004-2007 Toyota Sienna
  • Replacing the Radiator on a 2004

Other Resources:

  • An online chat conversation with a Toyota mechanic on Justanswer.com about horn troubles

Disclosure as an Amazon Associate: As an Amazon Associate, I get commissions from qualifying purchases. This means that if you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, I will get a commission on the sale. Regardless of whether the link is an affiliate link, the price of the item remains the same. Regardless, I only recommend items or services that I feel will be beneficial to the readers of Share Your Repair. By clicking on the affiliate links, you are assisting Share Your Repair in its mission, and I really appreciate your assistance.

Toyota Sienna horn not working – causes and how to fix it

The horn in your Toyota Sienna is a very vital safety element. While driving with a damaged horn, you and others on the road are at risk of being seriously injured or killed. If the horn on your Sienna does not sound when you touch the button on the steering wheel, there might be a number of reasons for this. In this post, we will explain what they are and what you can do to prevent them. Toyota Sienna — This vehicle is a mid-size sedan (photo by Toyota) For your Toyota Sienna, some of the most typical reasons why the horn isn’t operating properly are a shorted fuse or relay, an insufficiently charged battery, an improperly charged horn, a corrosion or worn-out connection, a frayed wire, an inoperative clock spring, or a damaged horn button.

1. Blown fuse

The horn of the Toyota Sienna requires electricity to function properly. In the event of a blown fuse, the circuit is severed, and the horn is rendered inoperative. The fuse for the horn may be found in the owners handbook or on the fuse box lid of your Sienna, if you have one. If the fuse has blown, replace it with a new one that has the same amp rating as the old one. A comparison between a good fuse and a bad fuse. If you have a fuse puller or needle nose pliers, you may use these to remove the fuse from Sienna’s fuse box and hold it up against the light to examine it.

You must replace it with one that has the same amperage and, thus, the same color as the original.

Video

In electrical load switching, relays are electromagnetic switches that are used to turn on and off electrical loads. A faulty relay on your Toyota Sienna might also be the source of a faulty horn function. Horn relays are rectangular or square in form, with three or more legs at the bottom of each. You should first determine where the horn relay is placed in your specific Sienna model by consulting the owner’s manual. The information may be contained inside the owner’s handbook for your car. Most of the time, relays are found in the engine compartment or beneath a steering wheel on the left hand side of the vehicle.

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The battery of the car must always be disconnected prior to beginning the replacement process.

Typically, you may use an AC relay to test the horn relay to confirm that it is working properly.

Although the majority of relays are plugged in, they might still be a little tight. When removing the relays, take care not to do any harm to anything. It is important to remember that the battery must be reconnected once the relay has been replaced, or else no electricity will flow.

3. Bad horn

It’s possible that your Toyota Sienna’s horn has become damaged, making it unable to honk anymore. Horns are extremely durable and may endure for decades, sometimes even outlasting the vehicle that they are attached to. Despite this, it is susceptible to failure depending on how frequently you use it. In instance, if the horn is operational but does not sound correct, it is likely that one of the horns has worn out. You may check the horn on your Sienna by testing the voltage at the connector or using a test light to illuminate the area around it.

4. Broken wire or bad connector

Located at the front of your Toyota Sienna, the horn is a prime location for filth and other microscopic particles to accumulate over time. This might result in corrosion of the connection, which will result in poor conductivity of the connector. It is not always necessary to replace the corroded connection; in most circumstances, WD-40 may be used to clean the connector. Make sure the battery is detached when cleaning the connector, and that the connector is completely dry before plugging it back in for safety reasons.

  1. Turn on the multimeter and put the probes into the connection, one at a time, ensuring sure that the metal parts of the probes do not come into contact with each other – otherwise, the connector may short out and blow the fuse, potentially causing harm to the vehicle’s electrical system.
  2. The multimeter should read 12+ volts; if it reads 0 volts, it indicates conductivity failure in the horn system, which can be caused by a broken wire, a bad connector, a broken clock spring, or a faulty switch, among other things.
  3. When you hit the horn button on the steering wheel of your Sienna, the multimeter should read 12+ volts at the connection.
  4. In the event that bite marks or other signs of rodent activity are detected, there is a significant likelihood that a rat has let off some steam in the engine compartment of your Sienna.

5. Broken clockspring

Known as the spiral cable or clockspring, the rotary electrical connector in your Toyota Sienna allows you to turn the steering wheel while maintaining an electrical connection between the buttons on the steering wheel, which includes the horn button, and the vehicle’s electrical systems. This spring is placed in the space between the steering wheel and the center of the steering column. A fragile set of wires is contained within the clockspring, and these wires can be destroyed during service or due to abuse if the car has been driven for an extended period of time.

For example, the airbag warning light in the instrument cluster may illuminate, and other buttons on the steering wheel may cease to function.

Illustration of a clockspring. It is not possible to repair a clockspring that has been damaged. When one is determined to be damaged, it should be replaced with a new one. They are reasonably affordable.

6. Faulty horn button switch

Another possible cause of a non-functioning horn in your Toyota Sienna is a malfunctioning horn button located on the steering wheel. Depending on how frequently the horn has been used, the button may ultimately become worn out and no longer operate properly.

Conclusion

There are a variety of reasons why the horn in your Toyota Sienna may not be functioning properly. When trying to figure out what’s wrong, it’s best to start with the most obvious cause, such as a blown fuse or a defective relay. In any event, it is recommended that laypeople seek professional assistance since they can easily cause additional harm to their car, particularly to the electrical system. While you have a cup of coffee in the waiting room, a skilled technician can diagnose the problem.

Where can I find the horn fuse on Toyota Sienna ?

Modern automobiles are becoming increasingly technologically advanced, and although this provides us with increased comfort, we must, regretfully, bear the consequences of this advancement. The majority of folks are not comfortable with anything electrical on our Toyota Sienna, and they are even less comfortable with managing the fuses on it. In this post, we will attempt to assist you in resolving your fuse difficulties, and in particular, in locating the fuse for the horn on your Toyota Sienna.

Why replace the horn fuse to Toyota Sienna?

. So let’s get started with our content page on the location of the horn fuse in your Toyota Sienna in the event that you want to replace it. You could get the impression that your fuse has blown, but you aren’t really sure it has. If you find yourself unable to operate your car’s horn, it’s probable that the fuse is to blame. It is critical to understand that a fuse serves as a safety feature on your Toyota Sienna, preventing overvoltage from occurring. It will be a resistor made of a filament that is more or less thick, which will allow a certain amount of stress to travel through it but will break if the tension is too great.

In general, when the horn of a Toyota Sienna ceases to function for no obvious reason, it is necessary to replace the fuse in the horn.

Where is the horn fuse on Toyota Sienna?

We will now look for the position of the horn fuse on your Toyota Sienna and replace it. The fuse is usually a 15 amp blue fuse of the same color. But there are two pieces of equipment that ensure that your horn works properly. The fuse and the relay. We’ll take it in turns to assist you in locating the fuse for your Toyota Siennahorn automobile.

Change the fuse inside the horn of your Toyota Sienna

. Your Toyota Sienna’s horn’s internal fuse will be the first thing we look at in this process.

You will need to go to the fuse box in your vehicle in order to accomplish this. However, if you can’t locate it, remember that it is close to your steering wheel and that the instruction booklet for your Toyota Sienna will tell you where it is exactly in relation to your steering wheel.

  • . Your Toyota Sienna’s horn’s internal fuse will be the first thing we check. The fuse box in your automobile will be the place to look for this. However, if you can’t find it, remember that it is next to your steering wheel and that the instruction booklet for your Toyota Sienna will tell you where it is exactly located.

Changing the horn fuse relay on your Toyota Sienna

After all is said and done, we will now look at how to check the state of the horn relay in your vehicle. To do this task, you will need to go to the engine compartment side of your vehicle:

  • Open the fuse box in your Toyota Sienna, which is located near the battery and protected by a plastic cover
  • Check the inside of the cache for the location of the horn relay, or consult your instruction manual if you are unable to locate it. Test your horn by reversing the relay with another relay or by replacing it with a new one.

You should now be able to locate the fuse for your car’s horn. If you are looking for additional fuses, such as the starter fuse on a Toyota Sienna or the car radio fuse on a Toyota Sienna, please do not hesitate to review our content pages dedicated to these fuses as well. If you’re looking for additional information about the Toyota Sienna, check out our Toyota Siennacategory.

Toyota Sienna Horn Assembly Problems

I now own a 1999 Toyota Sienna, which I purchased new in April 1999. On November 11, 2005, I had to have the horn repaired since it was necessary to crank the steering wheel in order for the horn to activate. It cost me $399.35 to complete the project. ‘Poor contacts in the clock spring; replace the clockspring,’ according to the dealership. I’m currently experiencing the same issue once more. I’m wondering whether this is a problem that comes with this particular model of car. Toyota would not assist with the costs because the warranty is only valid for 36,000 miles, or three years, on the vehicle.

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Do you know of any others?

(Please keep in mind that the equipment selections made are intended to fill in the necessary information from the options provided; they are not always correct.) The part numbers may be found elsewhere on this page.

6 Reasons Your Car Horn Isn’t Working—And How to Fix It

Image courtesy of Family Handyman.com

This is Why Your Car Horn Isn’t Working

Car horns are located on the front of the vehicle, where they are exposed to rain and road chemicals. Once the spray gets into the horn’s internals, it has the potential to short out the coil and cause the horn to die (and blow the fuse in the process). However, a damaged horn switch in your steering wheel, a broken ‘clock spring’ beneath the steering wheel, a bad horn relay, a broken wire, or a corroded ground can all result in an inoperative horn. Here’s how to do a background check on the most likely suspects.

  • For further information, consult the owner’s handbook for your vehicle.
  • With 16-gauge wire, two clamps, and an in-line fuse holder, you can construct a fused jumper with ease.
  • If the fuse blows, you’ll be stuck with a faulty horn.
  • Clean the ground connection on the horn, and then try to power the trumpet again.
  • If the horn operates well with jumpered power, the fault is upstream of the device.

If the relay is operational, you are dealing with a far more serious problem. Take it to a skilled vehicle technician for evaluation and repair. Next, determine what the weird automobile noises may be signaling.

Weekend Mechanic: Repairing 2000 Toyota Sienna Horn

The horn on our Sienna from 2000 has only functioned occasionally at best for the past year or so. The majority of the time, when I press the horn button in the center of the steering wheel, there is no reaction. Of course, this usually happens when I’m in desperate need of the horn. So, after multiple instances of cursing the horn, I eventually gave up and decided to tackle the repair myself. As you know, when I was younger, working on vehicles piqued my interest. However, now that I’m on the backside of 40, I no longer feel the same sense of excitement and adventure that I once did.

  • So I pulled out the Haynes handbook, looked at the wiring diagram, and got to work fixing things.
  • Then I removed the horn relay and tested it with the battery: it clicked when the battery was activated, therefore it worked.
  • This led me to conclude that the problem lied between the horn pad switch on the steering wheel and the relay on the vehicle.
  • According to internet sources (e.g., chat forums; check this link for further information), Over time, the grease that lubricates the bearings dries up, covering the bearings in a dry lubricant that serves as an insulator, causing them to fail.
  • All that is required to correct this issue is to grease the bearings.
  • But where exactly are these enigmatic bearings?
  • As a result, in order to assist other thrifty weekend technicians, I am publishing images of the bearing placement on my website.

Completely completing the process took me around one hour in total.

Disclaimer1: The material provided on this website is solely for informative purposes.

There are a plethora of reasons why you should not undertake this repair, and the information provided may not be accurate.

Disclaimer2: Please understand that I am well aware that my vehicle is filthy, as seen by the photographs.

My family also includes three teenagers, as well as our beloved golden retriever, who occasionally joins us on road trips and camping excursions.

Perhaps I am not the only person in America who has a discolored carpet and filth on their floor, but I believe I am (I did vacuum the van after these pictures were taken-out of guilt).

My initial reaction to some of the out-of-focus images I saw on the internet was harsh, but now I realize why they are so bad: Attempting to take a close-up image with only one hand in a dark truck while holding the component being photographed with the other hand is a difficult task!

First and foremost, unhook the battery.

This would also prevent the airbag from exploding in your face, which would be a disastrous incident that would spoil your entire day.

This will aid in the diagnosis of the problem, allowing you to be confident that the time and effort you put into this repair will be a worthwhile investment.

I utilized a battery clip that was attached to the lighter plug as well as the accessory plug for this project (see photo).

Next, look for any signs of ground beneath your steering column.

When the leads are not in contact with each other, the resistance (ohms) should be zero.

Following confirmation that you have a proper ground connection, you may inspect your steering column for ground connections (i.e., conductivity).

This is the only piece of metal that I could discover that was immediately accessible at the time (click on the photos to see a larger picture).

You will most likely receive a result that indicates resistance, which indicates that the problem is with those bothersome bearings.

It is not necessary to remove the coverings in order to have access to this region).

Remove the steering column covers and set them aside.

This plastic cover, which is adjacent to the carpet on the floor and which is covered when the door closes, serves as a kick plate.

I cautiously yanked on mine by slipping my fingers below it on the seat-side and slowly yanking at it, being careful not to break any plastic ‘trim retainers’ that could have been hidden there.

In order to gain access to the left side bolt of the panel sub assembly, you’ll need to remove this first.

Be cautious not to break any plastic ‘trim retainers’ that may be hidden behind the trim.

For this, first remove the 10mm bolts on either side of the panel sub assembly and then carefully pull it down from its mounting bracket.

It was necessary for me to detach the wires from the button with a little flat-head screw driver in order to put this panel on the floor.

Except for the 95-degree temperatures and 50-percent humidity, it was a rather straightforward task.

One of the screws is located just under the steering wheel (easy to get to).

To acquire access to these two screws, first spin the steering wheel 90 degrees to the right to gain access to the left screw, and then, starting from the center of the steering wheel, rotate the steering wheel 90 degrees to the left to gain access to the right screw, as shown below.

You can now see right through this beast’s stomach.

I started by spraying some electrical contact cleaner on the contacts.

Afterwards, I adjusted my strategy and utilized a multi-purpose oil (see the next paragraph for other suggestions on lubricants, including one that contains copper).

I sprayed, rotated the steering wheel 90 degrees, sprayed more, rotated the steering wheel back the other way 180 degrees, sprayed more, and so on, all the while holding a rag underneath the steering column to catch any lubricant that was trying to drip onto my ‘sub panel assembly’ sitting on the floor (note: one reader reported that rotating the steering wheel while the engine was not running damaged the power steering seals on some vehicles (not a Toyota).

Although I was not involved in that incident, caveat emptor!) Another examination with the ohmmeter revealed that the steering wheel had been grounded previously.

I repaired the dash and connected the battery, which triggered the car alarm, so keep the remote for your alarm close to hand at all times.

Having spent the previous hour staring at the filthy floor of the vehicle, I decided to get out the shop vac and vacuum the front half of the van, leaving the remainder to be cleaned by my children (which they did).

Wishing you success with your repairs. If anyone has any other suggestions, please share them. -Doc

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